Airfix Scale Models


Airfix Scale Models

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Avro Lancaster B.III
£39.99
In Stock

A08013A - Avro Lancaster B.III

As the third of Britain's four engined heavy bombers to enter RAF service during WWII, the Avro Lancaster proved to be an exceptional aircraft, possessing a large unobstructed bomb bay, which allowed it to carry some of the largest bombs of the war. At least thirty five Lancasters managed to complete an astonishing 100 missions or more and are referred to by historians and enthusiasts as the Lancaster Centurions, an exclusive group of extremely hard working bombers.


Scheme 1: R5868 S-Sugar 467 Squadron RAAF.

Scheme 2: LM624 57 Squadron.


BAE SYSTEMS is a registered trade mark of BAE Systems plc.

Douglas Dakota C-47 Skytrain 1:72
£39.99
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A08014 - Douglas Dakota C-47 Skytrain 1:72

Described by General Eisenhower as one of the four weapons that helped the Allies to win the Second World War, the Douglas DC3 and its military variant the C-47 Skytrain (Dakota in RAF service) has since gone on to be an instantly recognizable symbol of both air travel and the liberation of occupied lands that so characterized the Second World War. Continuing to serve even today in both modernized and original formats the DC3/C-47 is now seen as a pioneer of air travel.

Boeing B17G Flying Fortress
£39.99
In Stock

A08017B - Boeing B17G Flying Fortress

As a much-valued and one of the most well-known fighting aircraft designs of the Second World War, the Boeing B-17G Flying Fortress will look as eye-cathcing in your Airfix range as it did on the battlefield. Measuring at 457.2mm, featuring two livery schemes and a 254mm wingspan, no military collection is complete without the Boeing B-17G. Order direct from Airfix today!

Vickers Wellington Mk.1A/C
£39.99
Out of Stock

A08019 - Vickers Wellington Mk.1A/C

New Tooling Britains bomber force at the beginning of the Second World War only consisted of around 300 aircraft and was made up of both light and medium bomber squadrons. The most capable medium bomber of the day was the twin-engined Vickers Wellington, which first flew 1936 and entered RAF service with No.99 Squadron at Mildenhall in October 1938. The production aircraft bore little resemblance to the prototype aircraft and compared to contemporary medium bombers already in service, the Wellington appeared to be much more advanced in design and an aircraft to be feared by any potential enemy. Its sleek monoplane design and heavy defensive armament placed the new Wellington as one of the most advanced and capable medium bombers in the world.


Perhaps the most significant feature of the Wellingtons design was the adoption of a geodetic construction method, which was developed by famous British engineer and inventor Barnes Wallis. Duralumin W-beams were used to form a metal lattice-work construction on to which wooden battens would be screwed, which would then allow the doped fabric outer skin of the aircraft to be attached. The resultant fuselage was relatively light in weight but possessed great strength and whilst this method of construction posed challenges for companies engaged in manufacturing Wellington bombers, the inherent strength of the design would prove crucial when the aircraft was thrust into combat. Capable of withstanding significant battle damage, numerous RAF Wellingtons managed to bring their crews back home, when other bombers would have failed to do so.


BAE SYSTEMS is a registered trade mark of BAE Systems plc.

Vickers Wellington GR Mk.VIII
£39.99
Out of Stock

A08020 - Vickers Wellington GR Mk.VIII

The Vickers Wellington was Britains most capable bomber at the start of WWII and would see extensive service throughout the war, including with RAF Coastal Command. Undertaking long and arduous maritime patrols, Wellington Mk.VIIIsperformed reconnaissance, anti-submarine and anti-shipping strike roles in the vital battle against German U-boats, helping to keep Britains sea lanes open and preventing Axis forces re-supplying by sea.


BAE SYSTEMS is a registered trade mark of BAE Systems plc.

Vickers Wellington Mk.II
£39.99
In Stock

A08021 - Vickers Wellington Mk.II

As Britain looked to strike back at the start of WWII, the Vickers Wellington was arguably their most important aircraft and they needed to ensure a constant supply of new machines. In an attempt to introduce some engine option flexibility and to provide the Wellington with greater power, around 400 Mk.II Wellington’s were modified to take Rolls Royce Merlin X engines, a development which gave this famous bomber a very different appearance.

Canadair Sabre F.4
£39.99
In Stock

A08109 - Canadair Sabre F.4

The last few months of the Second World War saw the introduction of the worlds first operational jet aircraft and with their appearance, a clear indication as to the future of aviation. Taking a significant lead in jet powered aviation technology, Germany was at least 12 months ahead of their Allied adversaries in this regard and with the end of the conflict, there was a rush to gain access to as much of this information as possible, so it could be applied to British, American and Soviet aviation projects. In the US, the aviation industry had concentrated their efforts on perfecting piston powered aviation during the war, a decision which was vindicated through the success of the P-51 Mustang and the sheer numbers available to Allied air forces. Inevitably, this would have an impact on Americas entry into the jet age and whilst their first operational jet fighter, the Lockheed P-80 Shooting Star, was an excellent aircraft, it utilised the straight wing technology synonymous with WWII designs.


With its P-51 Mustang being widely regarded as the best single engined fighter of WWII, it was not long before the designers at North American aviation applied their undoubted talents to producing a new jet powered fighter, one which would incorporate research material obtained from the German jet programme. In their quest for ever greater speed, the new aircraft featured a 35% wing sweep and beautifully streamlined fuselage, whilst retaining the exceptional pilot visibility first introduced on the D variant of the Mustang. With three nose mounted .50 calibre machine guns on either side of the fuselage, the new Sabre shared much with the attributes of its piston engined predecessor, beautiful to look at, but a deadly fighting aeroplane.


The first flight of the XP-86 prototype took place on 1st October 1947, in the hands of famous WWII Pearl Harbor Curtiss P-40 fighter ace George Welsh, who was North Americans chief test pilot at that time. Later in the development programme, an F-86A Sabre would go on to set a new world airspeed record of 670.84 mph, underlining the credentials of this important new fighter.


On entering USAF service in 1949, the North American F-86 Sabre was not only Americas first swept wing fighter, but also the fastest fighter in the world and one of the most important aircraft in the post war jet era. The Korean War would witness the advent of the first jet versus jet combat and pitch Americas new jet fighter against the latest Soviet design, the highly capable Mikoyan Gurevich MiG-15, an aircraft which possessed a great aviation pedigree of its own and one which proved to be quite a shock for Western Powers. With both aircraft possessing advantages over the other, this aerial duel would prove to be quite an even contest, with the more robust training and previous WWII experience of Sabre pilots proving decisive in the end.


Whilst US military planners were quick to publish combat victory ratios of 10:1 in favour of the F-86 Sabre, later research suggested the Sabres dominance was probably nearer 3:1, though still underlining the effectiveness of the aircraft. As one of the worlds first classic jet fighters, the F-86 Sabre was produced in great quantities and went on to serve with around 30 of the worlds air forces, as well as being produced under licence in Canada, Australia, Japan and Italy.


Out of a final total production run which exceeded 9,800 aircraft, the Royal Air Force would operate around 430 Canadian built Sabres from 1953 until 1956, as the introduction of the excellent Soviet MiG-15 continued to have an impact on NATO military strategies. With the indigenously designed Supermarine Swift and Hawker Hunter still in development, the Sabre provided the RAF with a capable jet fighter at a crucial period in world history and whilst they would only see service for a relatively short period, it bought the RAF valuable time until they could introduce their own swept wing fighter designs.

North American F-86F-40 Sabre
£39.99
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A08110 - North American F-86F-40 Sabre

One of the most important aircraft of the early jet era, the North American F-86 Sabre was in many ways a jet powered version of the company's hugely successful P-51D Mustang from WWII and an aircraft which made full use of captured German aerodynamic research material. Featuring a distinctive 35 degree wing sweep, the Sabre also incorporated three nose mounted .50 calibre machine guns positioned on either side of the aircraft's nose, with this jet powered gunslinger sharing many design philosophies with its famous piston engined predecessor. On entering service with the U.S Air Force in 1949, the North American F-86 Sabre would have the distinction of not only being America's first swept wing fighter, but also the fastest fighter aircraft in the world at that time, a true aviation classic.

A later development of the classic Sabre, the F-86F-40 variant was the ultimate day fighter version of this famous aircraft and featured a number of improvements which kept the Sabre at the forefront of world fighter technology. With a new engine giving the aircraft more power this variant re-introduced the leading edge slats to the '6-3' wing area increase, enhancing the dogfighting capabilities of this famous fighter, whilst at the same time reducing the aircraft's landing approach speed to a much more manageable 124 mph. These modifications proved so successful that many earlier variants of the Sabre were retrospectively upgraded to include these advancements.

During the Korean War, the Sabre posted an impressive victory to loss ratio of 10:1 and helped 40 US pilots to achieve the coveted status of air 'Ace' during the conflict.

Avro Lancaster B.III (Special) The Dambusters
£46.99
In Stock

A09007 - Avro Lancaster B.III (Special) The Dambusters

While the Lancaster saw the vast majority of its service as a high altitude night bomber attacking strategic targets deep within Germany, notably its involvement in the battles of the Ruhr, Hamburg and Berlin, it was a daring low-level raid that gave the Lancaster arguably its finest hour. The Dambusters raid, as it has since become known, was one the most famous operations of the war.


Led by Wing Commander Guy Gibson, the 19 specially modified Lancaster bombers attacked the Mohne, Eder, Sorpe and Ennepe dams, with the Mohne and Eder dams being breached. This caused widespread destruction to both the German war effort and to food production. The dams were breached using a special type of bomb, the Upkeep mine, or 'bouncing bomb'. This was rotated before being dropped so that it skipped along the surface before impacting against the dam, sinking and exploding, thus rupturing the dam. This avoided the need for a high altitude raid and avoided the torpedo nets. The attack was a partial success but greatly improved the morale of the Allies and the British public.

Hawker Hunter F.6
£46.99
In Stock

A09185 - Hawker Hunter F.6

As far as classic British jet aircraft are concerned, few would argue that the beautiful Hawker Hunter should be placed at the head of this group, entering RAF service in 1954 and still providing training support almost 40 years later. The definitive interceptor version of the Hunter was the Mk.6 and by the end of 1958, all of the RAF's day fighter squadrons in Britain and Germany were equipped with these aircraft.


Schemes:

1) XF418 4FTS Brawdy.

2) XF509 4FTS.

3) Dutch AF.


BAE SYSTEMS is a registered trade mark of BAE Systems plc.

Supermarine Walrus Mk.1 'Silver Wings'
£46.99
Out of Stock

A09187 - Supermarine Walrus Mk.1 'Silver Wings'

The reputation of the Supermarine company was built on their ability to design and produce effective and reliable marine and amphibious aircraft for civilian and military use. The Walrus was a perfect example of their expertise and underlined the strength of the aircraft by performing a loop at the 1933 Hendon Air Pageant, to the astonishment of the massed ranks of spectators.


Schemes:

1) HMS Birmingham 4th Cruiser Squadron 1938-40.

2) 53.S.16, Flottille 53S, Aeronavale, Hourtin, 1945-48.

3) N20 Irish Air Corps 1939-40.


BAE SYSTEMS is a registered trade mark of BAE Systems plc.

Gloster Meteor FR.9
£46.99
In Stock

A09188 - Gloster Meteor FR.9

As the armed reconnaissance version of Britain's first operational jet fighter, the Gloster Meteor FR.9 was based on the F.8 fighter version of the aircraft and replaced Spitfires and Mosquitos in this role. The extended nose housed a Williamson F.24 camera, which could be positioned to fire either forward, port of starboard facing. Its range was extended significantly by the addition of external wing and ventral fuel tanks.


BAE SYSTEMS is a registered trade mark of BAE Systems plc.

Hawker Hunter F.4/F.5/J.34
£46.99
In Stock

A09189 - Hawker Hunter F.4/F.5/J.34

The service introduction of the Hawker Hunter F.4 in March 1955 presented the RAF with a more capable version of their sleek jet fighter, including a much needed increase in its internal fuel capacity. The F.4 also introduced the two distinctive streamlined chin blisters, which were designed to collect spent ammunition links from the guns, thus preventing potential damage to the aircraft.


BAE SYSTEMS is a registered trade mark of BAE Systems plc.

Bristol Blenheim Mk.1
£46.99
In Stock

A09190 - Bristol Blenheim Mk.1

When the first Bristol Blenheim Mk.I light bomber entered Royal Air Force service with No.114 Squadron at Wyton in March 1937, they not only replaced the squadrons Hawker Hind biplane bombers, but also pointed to the future of a new, modern air force. Capable of speeds approaching 100 mph faster than its predecessor, the Blenheim was the most capable light/medium bomber in the world at that time and would be the benchmark for all future aircraft designs, including those it would soon be forced to meet in combat.


During the early months of WWII, Blenheim crews would carry a heavy burden of strike operations against enemy targets, both from bases in the UK and in France as part of the Advanced Air Striking Force and British Expeditionary Force. Being relatively lightly armed and with constant equipment additions increasing the aircrafts weight, the Blenheim was no match for the modern fighters of the Luftwaffe and despite the heroic actions of a great many Allied pilots, the RAF suffered significant losses during this period.

Avro Anson Mk.I
£46.99
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A09191 - Avro Anson Mk.I

Although not generally regarded as one of the most fashionable British aircraft to see service during the Second World War, the Avro Anson was nevertheless one of the most important aircraft not only of the inter-war years, but also during WWII itself and is deserving of more recognition than it usually receives. An aircraft which began its development in 1933 as a high speed, long range, modern mail carrying charter aircraft, the Avro 652 was still in development when the British Air Ministry issued a requirement for a twin engined, general reconnaissance and multi-role aircraft capable of performing a variety of roles for both the Royal Air force and the Royal Navy.

The Avro team felt that their new aircraft would be perfect for the role and later entered it in an official evaluation programme with the competitor de Havilland DH89M, the military version of their biplane Dragon Rapide. The Avro design was found to possess greater range and endurance and whilst not without a few areas which would require some design modifications, an initial order for 174 militarised aircraft was placed. The Avro 652 would be given the name Anson after an Eighteenth Century British Admiral of the fleet, a development which did not please everyone at the Air Ministry, but as the aircraft was intended to undertake maritime patrols, the name did seem rather appropriate.

Highlighting the importance of the Avro Anson as a British aircraft type, when it entered service with No.48 Squadron at RAF Manston in March 1936, it became the first monoplane type to achieve squadron service status, but was also the first RAF aircraft to feature a retractable undercarriage. At this time, the advanced Anson quickly began to attract attention from several other countries and in order to capitalise on this interest, some aircraft were diverted from existing RAF orders to fulfil these requirements, with full production forcing Avro to open new manufacturing facilities in the North West of England. The RAF Anson Mk.I was equipped with a fixed forward firing .303 machine gun operated by the pilot and a single Lewis gun mounted in the manually traversed dorsal turret. It could also be equipped with a modest bomb load, something which was required by submarine hunting aircraft operated by Coastal Command and whilst there were no reports of an Anson sinking a U-Boat, their presence would keep these feared hunters submerged.

During the Dunkirk evacuations, Ansons used to cover the operation came under attack by Messerschmitt Bf 109 fighters, which had real difficulty engaging the slow flying British aircraft. Consistently overshooting the Ansons, they came in the sights of the aircraft's forward firing gun and astonishingly, two of the Luftwaffe fighters were shot down and a third was badly damaged, with all the Ansons escaping from the engagement unscathed. Despite the fact that the RAF entered the Second World War with 26 squadrons equipped with Avro Ansons, they were basically obsolete as a fighting machine and particularly for the ones assigned to Bomber Command, they were quickly withdrawn to secondary training roles, a task for which the 'Faithfull Annie' was particularly well suited. As part of the Empire Air Training Scheme, many thousands of aircrew destined for service with Bomber Command were trained both in the UK and overseas, including those destined to serve in the Avro Lancaster, the mighty bomber which was produced in some of the same factories previously used to produce Ansons.

With just under 11,000 Ansons eventually produced, the final RAF example was only withdrawn from service as a station communications aircraft in 1968.

WASA
£39.99
In Stock

A09256V - WASA

In 1625, while Sweden was busy building an empire around the Baltic Sea, the Swedish King Gustavus Adolphus ordered new warships. Among them was the Wasa. On its maiden voyage in 1628, the Wasa set sail and fired a salute.


But only after a few minutes of sailing the ship began to heel over. She righted herself slightly - and heeled over again and, to everyones horror and disbelief, the glorious and mighty warship suddenly sank.

Westland Navy Lynx Mk.88A/HMA.8/Mk.90B
£49.99
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A10107A - Westland Navy Lynx Mk.88A/HMA.8/Mk.90B

The Westland Lynx is a British multi role helicopter that has seen service in both land based army forms as well as ship based naval variants. Entering service in 1977, the Lynx has since seen many upgrades and improvements throughout its service hostory. The Mk8 naval variant entered service with the Royal Navy in the early 1990s and has since gone on to provide them with an excellent maritime attack helicopter, performing well in the anti-submarine role as well as search and rescue and more recently anti-piracy operations off the coast of Somalia. Fiercely armed with either missiles, depth charges or a heavy machine gun the Lynx is a formidable machine and is more than capable of taking on the best of the world's surface vessels as well as any potential underwater threat.

Vickers Valiant
£54.99
In Stock

A11001A - Vickers Valiant

The Valiant was the first of the RAF’s V Bomber trio to enter service. The most conventional of the three designs, it was also the first to drop bombs in anger against Egyptian airfields during the Suez campaign. It was also the first RAF machine to drop a Hydrogen bomb during the Operation Grapple tests in 1957. However its career was cut short by serious problems with its rear spar, leading to fatal accidents and subsequent grounding of the fleet.

Avro Shackleton AEW.2 1:72
£54.99
Out of Stock

A11005 - Avro Shackleton AEW.2 1:72

With the ability to mount patrols for up to twelve hours, the Rolls-Royce Griffon powered Avro Shackleton AEW.2 provided Britains airborne early warning protection for almost 19 years. Following the withdrawal of HMS Ark Royal and her compliment of Gannet AEW aircraft, the Gannets radar units were simply removed and attached under the forward fuselage of the new AEW version of the Shackleton. Tracing its lineage back to the famous Avro Lancaster bomber, the Shackleton was a long-range maritime patrol aircraft, which was used primarily on anti-submarine operations, but was also required to perform a number of other roles.


Entering RAF service in 1951, the majority of Shackletons were powered by the mighty Rolls Royce Griffon engine and were the last aircraft in the illustrious line of four engined propeller powered bomber aircraft to see Royal Air Force service. As the British government issued plans of their intention to scrap HMS Ark Royal, the navy were concerned that their ships would lose important airborne early warning capability, which was simply not an option. The solution was to put the radar units used on Ark Royals Fairey Gannets into the airframe of the trusty Avro Shackletons and although these were obviously land based aircraft, the impressive endurance of the Shackleton would greatly enhance the effectiveness of the navys airborne early warning capabilities.


Twelve Shackleton airframes were converted to AEW Mk.2 standard and operated in the colours of No.8 Squadron, originally at RAF Kinloss in early 1972. Following the completion of significant runway strengthening works at nearby RAF Lossiemouth, the Shackletons moved to Lossiemouth in August 1973, where they remained until the unit finally disbanded in 1991.


BAE SYSTEMS is a registered trade mark of BAE Systems plc.



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