Airfix Scale Models


Airfix Scale Models

All products on the Airfix website.

Supermarine Spitfire FR Mk.XIV
£28.99
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A05135 - Supermarine Spitfire FR Mk.XIV

Continuing the wartime development of the famous Supermarine Spitfire, the Mk.XIV saw the classic shape of Mitchell's celebrated fighter paired with the awesome power of the new Rolls Royce Griffon engine. The resultant aircraft was superb and one of the RAFs most capable fighters of WWII, proving particularly successful when employed against the V-1 flying bomb attacks which Germany launched against southern Britain, from the summer of 1944.


The adoption of the Rolls-Royce Griffon engine provided the Spitfire with a significant increase in performance, but not without presenting Supermarine designers and pilots converting to the aircraft with a few challenges. Installation of the new engine in the existing Spitfire airframe required a redesign of both the front and rear sections of the aircraft and the use of a distinctive five bladed Rotol propeller. Pilots used to flying Merlin engined versions of the aircraft would find the Griffon turned in the propeller in the opposite direction and whilst the earlier aircraft tended to veer to the left on take-off, the Griffon powered machines would veer in the opposite direction if the pilot forgot and applied their usual corrective inputs, their first flight could be a particularly short and uncomfortable one.


As the only British fighter type to remain in production throughout WWII, the Spitfire was constantly developed to ensure it remained at the forefront of fighter performance, with the Griffon powered aircraft being around 80 mph faster than the original Mk.I machines. With the purr of the early Merlin engines replaced by the throaty growl of the mighty Griffon, these later developments appear to be much more capable versions of the fighter than the classic early Spitfires, even though they are basically a development of them. The Griffin powered Spitfire Mk.XIV possessed greater performance than that of the thoroughbred Mk.IX and therefore was superior to both the Luftwaffe's Focke Wulf Fw 190 and the latest versions of the Messerschmitt Bf 109.


Taking part in air operations in support of and in the months following the D-Day landings, the Mk.XIV was used extensively by the 2nd Tactical Air Force, equipping all 20 of the Spitfire Squadrons that operated from the continent in the months between D-Day and VE-Day. Employed predominantly in an armed reconnaissance role, these fearsome fighters would search for targets behind German lines, attempting to disrupt both their retreat and their ability to send reinforcements to the current front line. Their speed also made them an ideal aircraft to help counter the growing Doodlebug threat endured by southern Britain in the months following Operation Overlord and the D-Day landings.


BAE SYSTEMS is a registered trade mark of BAE Systems plc.

North American Mustang Mk.IV/P-51K Mustang
£28.99
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A05137 - North American Mustang Mk.IV/P-51K Mustang

As the North American Mustang was developed as a direct result of a British Air Ministry requirement, it is somehow fitting that the RAF and Commonwealth air forces used the aircraft extensively during WWII. The British designation for the later P-51D version was Mustang IV, with the Dallas built P-51K, which used a different Aeroproducts propeller, referred to as the Mustang IVa.


Scheme 1: KM272 Dooleybird 19 Squadron RAF 1945.

Scheme 2: KH676/CV-A Flg Off A F Lane, 3 Squadron RAAF Cervia Italy, April 1945.


Produced under licensed. Boeing, Douglas, McDonnell Douglas, North American Aviation, A-4 Skyhawk, AH-64 Apache Longbow, B-17 Flying Fortress, B-25 Mitchell, C-47, DC-3, F-4 Phantom, P-51 Mustang, their distinctive logos, product markings, and trade dress are alltrademarks of The Boeing Company.

North American P51-D Mustang (Filletless Tails)
£28.99
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A05138 - North American P51-D Mustang (Filletless Tails)

A thoroughbred fighting aeroplane, the P-51D Mustang was produced in greater numbers than any other variant and introduced a number of improvements over earlier models. With a new wing design, teardrop canopy and lower rear fuselage, the P-51D was the mount of many USAAF aces and became the primary US fighter in the European Theatre, following its introduction in mid 1944.

Supermarine Spitfire MkXIV Civilian Schemes
£28.99
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A05139 - Supermarine Spitfire MkXIV Civilian Schemes

Possessing grace, beautifully clean lines and lots of power, several Spitfires would survive the war to become highly distinctive aircraft on the civilian aviation scene either operating as Airshow display aircraft, or competing in air race competitions around the world. The aggressive profile of the Spitfire XIV made for a particularly striking air racer and helped to reaffirm the enduring legacy of this famous aeroplane.


BAE SYSTEMS is a registered trade mark of BAE Systems plc.

Supermarine Spitfire Mk.XVIII
£28.99
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A05140 - Supermarine Spitfire Mk.XVIII

A variant of this famous fighting aeroplane which was the result of a desire to produce a 'Super Spitfire', the Mk.XVIII was a further refinement of the Rolls Royce Griffon powered Mk.XIV, but one which incorporated a number of improvements over its predecessor. In addition to several cockpit enhancements for the pilot, the Mk.XVIII also benefitted from increased fuel carrying capacity and strengthened wings, allowing it to carry either rockets or bombs in addition to its cannon and machine gun armament. With a total production run or 300 aircraft, the RAF would receive two versions of this fighter, the F.Mk.XVIII fitted with the standard E wing and the FR.Mk.XVIII, which included a camera for photo reconnaissance work. Too late to see service during WWII, these powerful Spitfires did see action as part of 'Operation Firedog' and actions against Communist guerrillas during the Malayan Emergency.

Concorde
£24.49
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A05170V - Concorde

Without doubt one of the most famous aircraft in the history of aviation, the Anglo-French BAC/SUD (later BAe/Aerospatiale) Concorde was a supersonic transport aircraft which possessed performance that would put most military fighters to shame. With two prototype aircraft built to prove the viability of supersonic flight for the civilian market, the British Concorde 002 (G-BSST) made its first flight from Filton on 9th April 1969 and joined its French counterpart at the Paris Airshow later the same year, where they both made their debuts.


Ultimately, only Air France and British Airways would operate Concorde commercially and even though only 20 aircraft were built, they always represented the ultimate way to fly and a blue riband service for the rich and famous.

Bomber Re-supply Set
£28.99
In Stock

A05330 - Bomber Re-supply Set

As the air war over occupied Europe progressively developed, so did the equipment used by the RAF and its Bomber Command. Specialist vehicles were introduced to supply arms and equipment to waiting machines and maintenance tasks were made easier through the introduction of specialised equipment. 


The mechanization of these tasks and duties is well represented in this set. While not as glamorous as their flying counterparts, the contribution played by trucks, tractors, and vans, as well as the men that crewed them, cannot be forgotten, or underestimated.

Heinkel He.111 P2 1:72
£33.99
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A06014 - Heinkel He.111 P2 1:72

First flying in 1935 when Germany was banned from building bombers under the Treaty of Versailles, the Heinkel He111 was at first disguised as a fast transport plane. However its real purpose soon became clear when it was used as a bomber during the Spanish Civil War. The early variants proved to be capable fast bombers with only small numbers being lost to enemy action.

By the start of the Second World War the He111 had undergone some major changes, resulting in the P model. The engines were now more powerful Daimler Benz DB601 units, and there was an enlarged glass nose section housing the majority of the crew. This afforded them excellent visibility but made them very vulnerable.
During the Battle of Britain the P variant was being phased out, but it continued to serve in some numbers. Against the modern RAF fighters the He111 now suffered from a lack of speed and defensive armament. Before being switched to night duties the He111 formed the backbone of the Luftwaffe's bomber force, but did suffer some heavy casualties.

North American B25C/D Mitchell
£33.99
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A06015 - North American B25C/D Mitchell

The role of medium bomber proved to be one of the most crucial during the Second World War and after something of a challenging service introduction, the North American B-25 Mitchell developed into a highly successful aircraft. Seeing service in every theatre of operation, the B-25 was the most versatile aircraft of its type, fulfilling a multitude of tactical roles in many different operating environments. Arguably, the most famous action involving the North American B-25 Mitchell came just after 8am on 18th April 1942, when sixteen of the bombers lifted off the relatively short deck of USS Hornet and set course for Japan. Intended as a strike at the heart of the Japanese Empire who had infamously attacked the US Pacific Fleet at Pearl Harbor, this audacious and heroic raid illustrated the resolve of the American people and the determination of their military forces to strive for victory.


The early B-25B aircraft used on the Doolittle Raid performed well, but were already in the process of being upgraded. The later C/D model (different letters were used to denote the manufacturer) proved to be the definitive version of this extremely effective medium bomber and was the first truly mass produced version of the aircraft. An extremely rugged and versatile aircraft, the Mitchell saw service as an anti-submarine patrol aircraft off the coast of Florida and as a strike bomber in the deserts of North Africa, proving successful at both. Some of the later versions of the B-25 became the most heavily armed aircraft of the war, with no less than 18 machine guns and an array of other offensive weaponry. With a solid nose housing 8 heavy guns, these aircraft were lethal gunships, capable of destroying anything in its line of fire.


Produced under licensed. Boeing, Douglas, Mc Donnell Douglas, North American Aviation, A-4 Skyhawk, AH-64, Apache Longbow, B-17 Flying Fortress, B-25 Mitchell, C-47, DC-3,F-4 Phantom, P-51 Mustang, their distinctive logos, product markings,and trade dress are all trademarks of The Boeing Company.

North American Mitchell Mk.II™ 1:72
£33.99
Out of Stock

A06018 - North American Mitchell Mk.II™ 1:72

In Royal Air Force service, the capable North American B-25C/D Mitchell tactical medium bomber was designated the Mitchell II, with the RAF being the only force to operate the type of raids into occupied Europe from bases in Britain. In the weeks following the D-Day landings, RAF Mitchells were sent to operate from advanced airfields in France, to provide support for advancing Allied ground units.


Scheme 1: FL212 EV-W -Nulli Secundus 180 Squadron RAF Dunsfold 1943.

Scheme 2: FV923 SM-E Lasham 1943.

McDonnell Douglas Phantom FG.1 RAF
£33.99
In Stock

A06019 - McDonnell Douglas Phantom FG.1 RAF

With the RAF already operating Phantoms initially intended for the Royal Navy at Leuchars air base in Fife, the withdrawal of HMS Ark Royal in 1978 meant that they also inherited the rest of the Fleet Air Arm Phantom fleet. Nos 43 and 111 Squadrons would use the Phantom FG.1 to defend Britains airspace until 1989, when they both converted to the BAe Tornado F.3.


Boeing, Douglas, McDonnell Douglas, North American Aviation, A-4 Skyhawk, AH-64 Apache Longbow, B-17 Flying Fortress, B-25 Mitchell, C-47, DC-3, F-4 Phantom, P-51 Mustang, their distinctive logos, product markings, and trade dress are all trademarks of The Boeing Company.

North American B25B Mitchell
£33.99
In Stock

A06020 - North American B25B Mitchell

In the aftermath of the Pearl Harbor Raid, America embarked on an audacious plan to strike at the very heart of the Japanese nation and post clear intentions of their resolve for ultimate victory. On 18th April 1942, sixteen B-25B Mitchell bombers lifted off the relatively short deck of USS Hornet and set course for Tokyo crewed by volunteers and each man would become an American hero.

Blackburn Buccaneer S.2 RN
£33.99
In Stock

A06021 - Blackburn Buccaneer S.2 RN

The mighty Blackburn Buccaneer was one of the most capable low-level strike aircraft of the Cold War period, originally entering Royal Navy service in 1962 to counter the significant threat of a massive Soviet Naval expansion programme. Rather than face the crippling cost of building new ships of their own to meet this threat, British thinking at the time was to use their new strike jet to destroy the Soviet ships with a combination of conventional and nuclear weapons. Capable of extremely high speeds at low level, the Buccaneer proved to be the ideal aircraft to keep the Warsaw Pact countries on their toes, even though the performance of the first Buccaneers to enter service was affected by a lack of power from their two de Havilland Gyron Junior engines. Operating from the decks of Britains relatively small aircraft carriers, the Buccaneer had to be tough and its rugged, no nonsense design approach was underlined rather effectively by the aircrafts manufacture and flight testing procedure.


Constructed at Blackburn Aviations Brough facility, each assembled Buccaneer was transported by road, pulled behind a truck on its own undercarriage. They would make a journey of around 16 miles down winding country lanes and across bridges with sharp bends to the companys Holme-on-Spalding Moor facility, where they would undergo final checks and flight testing. Addressing most of the issues which prevented the early aircraft from realizing their full potential, the Buccaneer S.2 was a much improved platform, boasting a modified wing, increased fuel capacity and a pair of powerful Rolls Royce Spey engines. This new variant provided the Fleet Air Arm with a truly exceptional strike aircraft, which excelled in the low level environment in which it was tasked to operate.


One particularly useful design feature for an aircraft which operated mainly over water was the type of ejection seat fitted in the Buccaneer in the event of a ditching, the seat would still fire even if the aircraft was submerging. As the Royal Navy retired their larger carriers in 1978, their much loved Buccaneers were transferred to the care of the Royal Air Force, who were already admirers of the many qualities possessed by this aircraft and grateful for this increase in their inventory. At its peak strength towards the end of the 1970s, the Blackburn Buccaneer equipped no fewer than six Royal Air Force Squadrons.

Blackburn Buccaneer S.2 RAF
£33.99
In Stock

A06022 - Blackburn Buccaneer S.2 RAF

Designed to mount high speed maritime strike operations from the decks of Britains relatively small aircraft carriers, the Blackburn Buccaneer was a real brute of an aeroplane, built like a brick outhouse and the most capable aircraft of its type in the world it also happened to be the heaviest aircraft the Royal Navy had ever operated. Perhaps nothing illustrates the rugged, no nonsense approach to the aircrafts design philosophy than its manufacture and flight testing procedure.


Constructed at Blackburns Brough facility, each completed Buccaneer was transported by road, on its own undercarriage, to the companys Holme-on-Spalding Moor airfield for flight testing, a towed journey on normal roads of around 16 miles. Although developed as a naval aeroplane, the Buccaneer was also offered to the Royal Air Force as a capable strike and reconnaissance aircraft, however, at that time, they only had eyes for the BAC TSR-2 and dismissed the Buccaneer almost out of hand. Cancellation of the TSR.2 project and a later decision not to purchase the American built General Dynamics F-111 jet led the RAF to rather reluctantly accept the Buccaneer as a Canberra replacement, with the aircraft entering squadron service some seven years after it entered service with the Navy. A subsequent order for new Buccaneers was placed for the RAF and it was decided that they would also inherit former Royal Navy aircraft, as their larger aircraft carriers were retired.


Interestingly, the new aircraft ordered for the RAF would retain the folding wings and arrester hook of the original naval Buccaneers, to avoid the cost of re-development. The first Royal Air Force unit to receive the Buccaneer was No.12 Squadron at Honington in October 1969 and despite their initial misgivings, the RAF quickly learned to appreciate the many qualities of this exceptional aircraft. Capable of extremely stable flight at high speeds and low altitudes, the Buccaneer proved to be the ideal strike aircraft to keep the Warsaw Pact countries on their toes.


During exercises in the US and Canada, RAF crews regularly demonstrated their bombing prowess and the capabilities of their aircraft, winning many service accolades in the process. At its peak strength in the early 1970s, the Buccaneer equipped no fewer than six RAF Squadrons, including the Operational Conversion Unit. During the twilight of the Buccaneers service career, the RAF was forced to take the aircraft to war, more than 20 years after it had entered squadron service. The Gulf War of 1991 saw strike operations moving to higher altitudes, due to the effectiveness of Iraqi anti-aircraft defences. The Tornados and Jaguars of the Royal Air Force carrying out these missions needed to increase the accuracy of their attacks and needed the support of twelve ageing Buccaneers and their laser target designation capabilities. Making a significant contribution to the success of Operation Granby, these Buccaneer Sky Pirates provided a fitting reminder of why this magnificent aircraft should be considered one of the finest achievements of the British aviation industry.

Hawker Sea Fury FB.11 'Export'
£33.99
In Stock

A06106 - Hawker Sea Fury FB.11 'Export'

The last in an illustrious line of Hawker piston engined fighters, the Sea Fury entered service with the Royal Navy too late to see operations during WWII, but proved to be one of the fastest propeller driven aircraft ever produced. Attracting plenty of overseas interest, the Sea Fury was also operated in some numbers by the navies of Holland, Australia and Canada, with Australian Sea Furys making a significant contribution to air operations during the Korean War.


Scheme 1: VW645 Sydney August 1955.

Scheme 2: FB11 803 Squadron Royal Canadian Navy 1948.

Scheme 3: Sea Fury FB. MK50 no860 Squadron Royal Dutch Navy Aerobats.


BAE SYSTEMS is a registered trade mark of BAE Systems plc.

de Havilland Vampire F.3
£33.99
In Stock

A06107 - de Havilland Vampire F.3

With the magnificent de Havilland Mosquito only just entering Royal Air Force service towards the end of 1941, designers at the company were next asked to turn their attentions to developing a new jet engine, one which was capable of powering a new generation of high speed fighter aircraft. Entrusted to the brilliant mind of engine designer Frank Halford, he was determined that his engine would be less complicated and of simpler design than the one being developed by his rival, Frank Whittle and he was ready to test his engine by April 1942. Showing great promise and producing the intended level of thrust, the only thing to do now was to see how it performed in the air.


At a time when jet engine technology was still in its infancy and these early engines were both a little lacking in power and slow to respond to power input commands, de Havilland's decision to produce their first jet aircraft as a single engined design was a brave one and placed great faith in the performance of their new jet engine. The diminutive new aircraft was initially designated de Havilland DH.100 'Spider Crab', with this codename used to mask the secret nature of the aircraft's development. Constructed around the new de Havilland Goblin 1 turbojet, the aircraft featured a relatively short, egg shaped central fuselage nacelle and employed a unique twin-boom tail configuration for control stability which allowed the engine'â„¢s thrust to egress directly from the central fuselage. With a requirement to take the pressure off the wartime aviation industry, this experimental aircraft had to be constructed of both wood and metal and it is interesting to note that the majority of the fuselage employed the same laminated plywood construction the company had perfected during Mosquito production.


Unfortunately for the de Havilland team working on the new jet, their Mosquito was proving to be such a war winner that this experimental project was deemed of lesser importance than producing Mosquitos, probably rightly so for Britain's war effort. To rub salt into this aviation wound, the first flight of the aircraft would be further delayed for an unbelievable reason - the only serviceable jet engine was ordered to be sent to America to help with the advancement of their own jet powered project. Mosquito production priority and a series of unforeseen delays eventually dictated that the Gloster Meteor's development outpaced that of its de Havilland competitor, with the Meteor taking the honour of being Britain's first jet aircraft to enter service and the only Allied jet of WWII.


Making its first flight on 20th September 1943, de Havilland DH.100 'Spider Crab' LZ548/G took off from the company's Hatfield airfield in the hands of chief test pilot Geoffrey de Havilland Jr. Interestingly, the 'G' used in the identification code highlights the secret nature of the project and required that the aircraft must be guarded at all times whilst on the ground. This first flight lasted just over 30 minutes, during which time the aircraft exceeded 400mph and showed great promise, however, it would be April 1945 before a production aircraft would take to the air, by which time the new jet fighter had been christened the Vampire. Despite its protracted development, Britain's second jet fighter to enter service would prove to be something of a classic and is now regarded as one of the most successful early jet aircraft in the world.


The Vampire F.Mk.I entered Royal Air Force service in March 1946, to be followed by the revised and more capable F.3 just two years later. The Vampire F.3 was basically a longer range version of its predecessor, featuring increased internal fuel capacity and the ability to carry two external fuel tanks. This latest variant also differed visually, in that it incorporated taller and more rounded vertical stabilisers, a lowered horizontal stabiliser and distinctive 'acorn' fairings at the base of each vertical stabiliser. Although this was still relatively new technology, de Havilland cleverly designed the aircraft to be simple to maintain and operate, earning the aircraft an enviable reputation for reliability amongst air and ground crews alike and allowing more pilots to safely make the transition to jet powered flight. 


With a number of significant firsts to its name, the Vampire was the first RAF aircraft to exceed 500 mph, with the extra range of the F.3 allowing this to be the first jet fighter to cross the Atlantic. The Vampire F.3's of No.32 Squadron were also the first RAF jet fighters to be deployed outside Northwest Europe and the first to operate in the higher temperatures of the Mediterranean. Witho

Junkers JU87B-2/R-2 1:48
£36.49
In Stock

A07115 - Junkers JU87B-2/R-2 1:48

Although usually associated with the Wehrmachts feared Lightning War attacks at the beginning of WWII, the Ju87B Stuka was also a highly effective maritime strike bomber. Capable of performing precision dive bombing attacks against any Allied vessel, the Stuka took a heavy toll of shipping in the English Channel, North Africa and in the Mediterranean. The Stuka also saw service with the air forces of Italy, Romania, Bulgaria and Hungary, as well as remaining in Luftwaffe service throughout WWII. The attack dive of the Stuka was so severe, that quite a number of automatic features had to be incorporated into the manoeuvre.


At an altitude of approximately 15,000 ft., the pilot would locate his target through a bombsight window, which was located in the floor of the cockpit. His engine and propeller had automatic controls, to optimise the aircraft when in a dive, and an automatic trimmer would make the aircraft tail heavy, as the pilot initiated the dive. He would move the dive lever to the rear, which would limit the kick of the control column and quickly begin a defined sequence of actions, which if done correctly, would see his ordnance detonate on his intended target. He quickly set the trim tabs, reduced the throttle and closed the engine coolant flaps. The aircraft would automatically become tail heavy and pitch over in a 180-degree roll, placing the aircraft in a steep nose-down dive at the same time, dive breaks were automatically deployed, to reduce the speed of the dive, to a constant 360 mph. This was the point of no return as the attack sequence had begun.


As the strain on the body of the pilot increased, he still had much work to do. The angle of his dive could be checked by looking at a series of red lines on the side of his cockpit window and lining them up against the horizon 60, 75, or 80 degree angle of attack. He would then look forward through the fixed gun sight, to line up his attack, before releasing his heavy main bomb - the optimum release height was indicated to the pilot, by a light flicking on in his altimeter. The bomb was carried on a large U-shaped cradle, which would swing down on release, throwing the bomb safely clear of the large propeller and on to the target. As all this action was taking place, the pilot would have certainly had at least a couple of reassuring glances at the red pins protruding up from the top of the wings, which informed him that the automatic dive recovery system was engaged, should he fall victim to a g-induced black-out. All this would have been taking place in just a matter of a few, frantic seconds!


Once the bombs had left the aircraft, it automatically began its dive recovery sequence. This was the point at which the maximum g loading on the crew would be felt and forces in excess of six times the force of gravity were regularly experienced, which could result in vision impairment at the very least. Once recovered and the nose of the aircraft was above the horizon, the dive breaks were automatically retracted, the throttle was opened and the propeller was set to climb the pilot then quickly had to manually open the coolant flaps, to prevent the engine from overheating and then resume flying the aircraft.


This was the point that the Stuka was at its most vulnerable, flying at low level, at relatively slow speed and in hostile territory. His rear gunner may still be blacked out and indeed the pilot might still be feeling a little light headed, but every anti-aircraft gun, rifle and enemy fighter in the vicinity would be taking pot-shots at them, from every angle.

RNLI Severn Class Lifeboat
£36.49
In Stock

A07280 - RNLI Severn Class Lifeboat

The Severn class lifeboat is the largest lifeboat in the RNLI fleet introduced into the fleet in 1995. As an all-weather lifeboat, she can take on the worst sea conditions and comes into her own on long offshore searches and rescues. When lives are at risk out at sea, time is of the essence. With a top speed of 25 knots and a range of 250 nautical miles, the Severn class lifeboat can reach casualties fast in calm or rough seas. She carries a small powered Y boat, ideal for rescues near rocks and shallow waters, and can be launched using the Severn's integral crane.


The kit in this box enables a fully detailed model of this RNLI Lifeboat to be built. Full detail of the outside deck, hull and fittings are included and by removing the cabin roof a fully detailed interior can be viewed. The decal scheme will allow any one of the current operational RNLI Severn Class lifeboats to be modelled. A minimum of £1.25 from the sale of this product will be paid in support of the RNLI.


*Payments are made to RNLI (Sales) Ltd (which pays all its taxable profits to the RNLI, a charity registered in England and Wales (209603) and Scotland (SC037736). Registered charity number 20003326 in the Republic of Ireland, of West Quay Road, Poole, Dorset BH15 1HZ RNLI name and logo are trademarks of RNLI used by Hornby Hobbies Limited under licence from RNLI (Sales) Ltd

Avro Lancaster BII
£39.99
In Stock

A08001 - Avro Lancaster BII

Due to shortage of Rolls-Royce Merlin engines, some 300 Lancasters were built with Bristol Hercules radial engines, becoming the BII Variant. Some were also fitted with enlarged bomb-bay doors to enable large 8000lb bombs to be carried, as well as a ventral defensive turret.



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