Airfix Scale Models


Airfix Scale Models

All products on the Airfix website.

Hawker Siddeley 121 Trident
£15.99
In Stock

A03174V - Hawker Siddeley 121 Trident

An aircraft which was a real triumph for the British aviation industry and one which can claim to be arguably the most advanced jetliner in the world at the time of its first flight in early 1962, the Hawker Siddeley 121 Trident should have sold in vast quantities, but eventually lost out to an American built competitor, the similarly configured Boeing 727. Originally envisaged as a longer range airliner capable of carrying a large passenger load, the project's major customer, British European Airways, decided they actually wanted a high frequency, short haul aircraft for their domestic and European routes, a decision which resulted in a design change that would see Boeing develop their competitor design, the one which would eventually attract most operator interest.


The Trident was a revolutionary three-engined 'Tri-liner' which incorporated many advanced design features, not least of which was a fully automated instrument landing system, an incredible innovation which is now standard on many of the world's jetliners. Allowing the aircraft to effectively perform blind landings in zero visibility conditions, the first commercial fully automatic landing was performed by a Trident flying from Paris to Heathrow on 10th June 1965, another significant first for the British Aviation industry. With the Boeing 727 attracting all the sales the originally configured Trident might have hoped to secure, only 117 were eventually built in four major variants, with the largest operator British Airways retiring their aircraft in 1985.

HMS Devonshire
£15.99
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A03202V - HMS Devonshire

A ship which represented the first of a new breed of vessel for the modern Royal Navy, HMS Devonshire (D02) was the first of the Navy's new County-class Destroyers, which were designed around the Seaslug surface to air missile system. A fleet defender designed to knock out high flying enemy aircraft before they could release their stand-off anti-shipping munitions, Devonshire was launched in June 1960 and commissioned in November 1962 and was the first vessel of her type to enter Royal Navy service and the first operational Royal Navy ship to fire the Seaslug missile. The missile was only used in action once and this was when HMS Antrim fired Seaslugs during the Falklands War, but it has to be said with somewhat disappointing results.

Decommissioned in 1978, she would spend the next six years languishing in Portsmouth harbour, as a proposed sale to the Egyptian Navy fell through. For such a notable ship, she would meet a rather ignominious end as a target ship, sunk by HMS Splendid in the North Atlantic on 17th July 1984, only days after serving as a floating target during Sea-Eagle anti-ship missile trials.

HMS Fearless
£15.99
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A03205V - HMS Fearless

One of the most famous British ships of the post war period, HMS Fearless was a modern Amphibious Assault Ship known in naval terms as an LPD (Landing Platform Dock), a modern development of the vessels which proved so important during the D-Day landings towards the end of the Second World War. The first purpose built ship of her type to be used by the Royal Navy, Fearless also had the distinction of being the last steam powered surface ship supplied to the force. Fearless and her sister ship HMS Intrepid provided Britain and the Royal Navy with an incredibly flexible and highly mobile assault force, able to replenish at sea and therefore capable of steaming to military hotspots anywhere in the world. Her internal vehicle decks could carry 400 troops and their equipment, in addition to up to fifteen Challenger tanks, but this could be increased to 700 troops if no tanks were carried. The stern of the ship could be submerged to allow the operation of four LCU landing craft, delivering troops and vehicles to the landing beaches quickly and effectively, immediately returning to reinforce the beachhead with more troops. A large flight deck increased the effectiveness of the ship still further, with helicopters usually up to the size of a Sea King further enhancing the flexibility of the ship's delivery capabilities.

During the Falklands War, HMS Fearless played a significant role as part of the British Naval Task Force, acting as a command ship for the operation, with her Bofors guns claiming at least two Argentine Air Force attack aircraft destroyed during the conflict. Following the surrender of Argentine forces on the Islands, Fearless played host to a number of high ranking Argentine Army officers, underlining the importance of her role.

During a notable service career which spanned more than 35 years, when Fearless was not representing the Royal Navy on a global stage, she could be found rescuing James Bond and Anya Amasova in their escape pod from the ocean around Malta, at the end of the movie 'The spy who loved me'. Decommissioned in 2002, HMS Fearless even made headlines during her disposal, as she became the first Western warship to be disposed of in an environmentally responsible manner.

LCM3 & Sherman
£15.99
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A03301V - LCM3 & Sherman

About the Tank:

The Landing Craft Mechanised (LCM) Mk.III was the most widely used LCM during World War II, with more than 8,600 being built in yards in the USA. They were employed by both the US Navy and the Royal Navy. The LCM Mk.III was extensively used in operations in the European and Pacific theatres from 1942, with many hundreds taking part in the "D-Day" landings in Normandy in June 1944. The Sherman M4A2 Tank was the best-known of all American medium tanks and was designed in 1941 as an improvement on the earlier M3 Lee and Grant series. After initial production in 1942, large numbers of Shermans were issued to the British Army and the type became the standard Allied medium tank.


About the Model:

From its extensive lifespan during the war to high demand with both the US and Royal Navy, the LCM3 & Sherman was a much-relied on tank in the battlefield and will become an equally fitting part of your Airfix collection. This 1:76 scale replica exclusively from Airfix comes with sprues and decals, two livery shemes and measures at 194mm, making it the perfect addition to your model range or as a gift for the military enthusiast in your life.

Bedford QLD/QLT Trucks
£17.99
In Stock

A03306 - Bedford QLD/QLT Trucks

About the Truck:

With over 52,000 vehicles built between 1941 and 1945, the Bedford QL 3-ton truck was one of the most numerous British vehicles during the Second World War. Designed as either a general duties truck or troop transport, the QL was powered by a 3.5 litre, 6-cylinder petrol engine producing 72bhp, giving a governed top speed of 38mph.


Thanks to its high ground clearance, cross-country tyres and a 2-speed, 4-wheel-drive transfer box located in the centre of the chassis (giving 8 forward gear ratios), the QL had excellent cross country mobility. A large number are still in use by enthusiasts.


About the Model:

As a vehicle with such power and endurance, it's little wonder why the Bedford QL 3-ton truck is still used my so many. Once a much-loved part of history, you can now bring this 1:76 scale Airfix model home today. Much like the original Bedford QL 3-ton truck, the model features immense wheel and body detailing as well as tw eye-catching livery schemes. At 90mm in length, this model will make a fantastic addition to your Airfix model collection. Order direct today!

Jaguar 420
£15.99
In Stock

A03401V - Jaguar 420

Introduced at the 1966 London Motor Show, the Jaguar 420 was a compact sporting saloon in the familiar Jaguar mould. Powered by a 4.2litre straight six, the 420 produced a good 245BHP and proved to be a good handling and powerful saloon of the period. The Airfix model has been unavailable for some time and has therefore become highly collectable, therefore making this new piece a worthy addition to any collection!

Northrop P-61 Black Widow
£20.49
In Stock

A04006V - Northrop P-61 Black Widow

One of the most distinctive aircraft of the Second World War, the P-61 Black Widow was the first US aircraft designed specifically for combat at night and the first developed with radar as its primary method of target detection. 


Powered by two mighty Pratt Whitney Double Wasp engines, this was a very big aeroplane for a fighter, but if it managed to detect an enemy aircraft, its impressive array of offensive firepower would usually result in the Black Widow living up to its sinister name. It is thought that a P-61 Black Widow operating in the Pacific Theatre scored the final Allied aerial victory of the Second World War, in the hours just prior to Japan's surrender.

Savoia-Marchetti SM79
£20.49
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A04007V - Savoia-Marchetti SM79

The Savoia-Marchetti SM79 Sparrowhawk was Italys main medium bomber of the Second World War and one of the most effective bombers operated by Axis forces. With its unusual three engined configuration, the SM79 was a fast aeroplane, possessing endurance, which made it especially effective in operations over the Mediterranean.


As a torpedo bomber, the SM79 earned a reputation for being one of the best anti-shipping aircraft of WWII and should the aircraft have to land on water as a result of damage sustained during an attack, the wooden wings and fabric covered fuselage gave the crew ample time to take to their life rafts. After the armistice with Italy, around 36 Sparrowhawks continued to fight with the Germans, some wearing Luftwaffe markings.

Bristol Blenheim Mk.1
£23.99
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A04016 - Bristol Blenheim Mk.1

The Bristol Blenheim bomber was ordered 'off the drawing board', and first deliveries to No 114 Sqn began in 1937. By the time of the Munich crisis in September 1938 sixteen home-based bomber squadrons were equipped with the type.


BAE SYSTEMS is a registered trade mark of BAE Systems plc.

Bristol Blenheim MkIV Fighter 1:72
£23.99
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A04017 - Bristol Blenheim MkIV Fighter 1:72

Ordered straight from the drawing board in 1935 the Bristol Type 142, later called the Blenheim was, for its time, a very advanced aircraft but by the outbreak of the Second World War it had been overtaken by fighter development. Seeing service across all the major fronts of the Second World War, the Blenheim was used extensively by the RAF as both a light bomber and fighter before being phased out of service in 1943, replaced by more modern types less vulnerable to enemy fighters.

Bristol Beaufort Mk.1
£23.99
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A04021 - Bristol Beaufort Mk.1

The second in a successful trio of twin engined aircraft designed by the Bristol Aeroplane Company during the 1930s, the Beaufort is significant as the only monoplane produced for the Royal Air Force designed from the outset as a torpedo bomber and reconnaissance platform. Developed from the Blenheim light bomber, the Beaufort was ordered off the drawing board by the Air Ministry, a move which showed great faith in the Bristol Company whilst illustrating the RAF's urgent need for an effective torpedo bomber at the same time.


Although initially intended as an evolutionary adaptation of the existing Blenheim bomber, it quickly became apparent that the new aircraft would look significantly different from its predecessor, with a much deeper front fuselage section housing a crew of four and the ability to carry a torpedo in a semi-recessed configuration. These modifications resulted in a gross weight increase of around 25% over that of the Blenheim and would require the installation of more powerful engines, if the new aircraft was not to suffer a significant performance reduction indeed, the new engines for the aircraft, combined with the existing production commitments for the Blenheim would cause lengthy delays during the Beauforts development. With the initial contract placed in August 1936, despite the pressing need for the new aircraft, it would be more than two years before the prototype Beaufort took to the air.


Entering Royal Air Force service with No.22 Squadron Coastal Command in January 1940, the Beaufort proved to be a rugged and highly manoeuvrable aircraft, although the engines continued to be something of a problem. Initially employed laying mines in enemy waters, Beauforts would later mount attacks against the German battleships Scharnhorst and Gneisenau and the heavy cruiser Prinz Eugen. However, in the European theatre, the aircraft would operate in the main as a medium bomber. In the Mediterranean, Beauforts operating from Egypt and Malta would take a terrible toll of Axis shipping and during a concerted onslaught from the middle of 1942, would make a significant contribution in denying Rommels Afrika Korps the vital supplies they needed to continue fighting the desert war. Due to the weight of the aircraft, a steep diving approach was not suitable for the Beaufort and a torpedo attack run needed to commence at a relatively low, flat attitude and quite some way from the target, if the torpedo release was to be successful and not hit the water ineffectively at a steep angle.


This made the aircraft vulnerable to accurate defensive fire, yet Beaufort pilots were brave and aggressive in their flying, using the excellent manoeuvrability of the aircraft to make the enemy gunners job much more difficult. Further afield, Beauforts of the Royal Australian Air Force would also prove extremely effective in the South-West Pacific, taking a heavy toll of Japanese shipping and posting an impressive operational record in the process.


Also employed in bombing, reconnaissance, convoy protection and troop resupply duties, the 700 Beauforts produced in Australia were regarded as some of the most reliable Allied aircraft to operate in these often demanding environments and were well-liked by both air and ground crews. Eventually equipping 19 RAAF Squadrons, the Beaufort was described as being perhaps the most important Allied aircraft in defeating Japanese forces in the South West Pacific region, which is some accolade for an aircraft whose contribution has largely been overlooked in the years since the end of WWII.

BAe Harrier GR7a / GR9
£23.99
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A04050A - BAe Harrier GR7a / GR9

The Harrier GR9 was a heavily updated development of the existing GR7, incorporating the ability to use a wide range of advanced precision weaponry, new communication systems and airframe upgrades.

Bae Sea Harrier FRS1 1/72
£23.99
Out of Stock

A04051A - Bae Sea Harrier FRS1 1/72

This version of the Sea Harrier is best known for its successful campaign in the war of 1982 in the South Atlantic, where it suffered no air-to-air losses against the Argentinian forces. They flew from both the carriers used in the operation; HMS Invincible and HMS Hermes. BAE SYSTEMS is a registered trade mark of BAE Systems plc.

Fairey Swordfish Mk.I
£23.99
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A04053B - Fairey Swordfish Mk.I

80 years ago, six Fairey Swordfish torpedo bombers flew from RAF Manston to attack the three German capital ships Scharnhorst, Gneisenau and Prinz Eugen making a dash up the English Channel in February 1942. This heroic attack was doomed to failure and all the Swordfish were shot down without any damage to the enemy ships. Lieutenant Commander Esmonde won a posthumous Victoria Cross and only 5 of the aircrew survived.

English Electric Lightning F2A
£23.99
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A04054A - English Electric Lightning F2A

The F2 introduced in 1962 was much modified in 1968 producing the F2A with square cut fin, kinked leading edges and enlarged ventral tank which gave an enhanced combat air patrol time of some 2 hours.

Westland Sea King HC.4
£23.99
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A04056 - Westland Sea King HC.4

Well-suited for amphibious warfare and the tactical insertion of ground troops, the 'Commando' was an important variant of the Sea King. It was initially proposed as a tactical transport for the Egyptian Air Force for which the amphibious capability of earlier Sea Kings was not required and so the side floats were deleted. With folding rotors and tail, the Commando entered service with the Royal Navy as the Sea King HC.4. It would eventually be provided with radar-warning and infrared jamming devices, and could also deploy M130/M147 flares as countermeasures.


Besides troops, it could also be fitted to carry underslung loads of up to 2.5 tonnes. Increased range and a 28-troop capacity made it ideal as an amphibious transport aircraft, and the HC.4 would see operational service in the Falklands, Balkans, Gulf, Lebanon and Afghanistan conflicts. It was often deployed in order to evacuate wounded personnel and refugees, as well as preparing for and supporting ground advances. It is due to be retired from UK forces service in March 2016.

Messerschmitt Me262B-1a/U1
£23.99
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A04062 - Messerschmitt Me262B-1a/U1

As the first operational jet fighter in the world, initial Messerschmitt Me262s combat operations were flown by single seat aircraft, piloted by some of the Luftwaffe's most experienced airmen. A two seat trainer version soon followed, which allowed new pilots to acquaint themselves with this advanced technology, without their conversion from piston power being their first solo jet flight.


Scheme 1: 10./NJG 11, W.Nr 111980, Red 12 + RAF Version 

Scheme 2: Avia CS-92 Czech AF

Westland Sea King HAR.3/Mk.43
£23.99
In Stock

A04063 - Westland Sea King HAR.3/Mk.43

As one of the highest profile aircraft in Royal Air Force history, the Westland Sea King HAS.3 served in the Search and Rescue role for almost 38 years, saving countless lives over this period and earning the admiration of a grateful British public. Possessing impressive endurance and all-weather flying capability, the stable and reliable Sea King allowed crews to carry out rescue missions in some of the most challenging flying conditions imaginable.


Schemes:

1) Westland Sea King Har.3, 78 Squadron RAF Mount Pleasant Falkland Islands Jan 1991.

2) Westland Sea King Mk.43 330 Squadron Royal Norwegian Air Force 1996.


The Westland Sea King is a product of Leonardo MW Ltd and all rights in it, including its name, are hereby reserved. The models have been produced with the permission and assistance of Leonardo MW Ltd.

Gloster Meteor F.8
£23.99
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A04064 - Gloster Meteor F.8

As the world watched in awe as the first jet powered aircraft appeared in the skies over Europe towards the end of WWII, capable of attaining speeds over 100 mph faster than the latest piston engined fighters, it is interesting to note that development work on jet propulsion actually started in the 1930s, with engineers in both Britain and Germany searching for the next generation of engine power. Indeed, the first flight of a turbojet powered aircraft actually took place just days before the outbreak of the Second World War, however, conflict would necessitate the production of thousands of aircraft powered by existing piston technology, so jet powered advancement proved to be relatively slow. In Britain, brilliant engineer Frank Whittle produced a viable turbojet engine and when the powerplant was installed in the Gloster E28/39 Pioneer for its first flight on 15th May 1941, it became the first British jet powered aircraft to fly - the race was now on to produce the first jet fighter for the Royal Air Force.

Conducted under the strictest security, the Gloster Aircraft Company prepared their new twin engined jet fighter for flight testing, but on test flight days, all non-essential personnel would be dismissed from the airfield and local police would close the surrounding roads to stop prying eyes discovering this closely guarded aviation secret. If anyone did catch a glimpse of this strange new aircraft in the air, they would have no doubt wondered where the propellers were and why did it sound so strange? By the summer of 1944, the secret was out and as No.616 Squadron prepared to take the Gloster Meteor F.1 to war from its base at RAF Manston, the Royal Air Force had their first jet fighter and a new era for British aviation had begun.

Britain's first jet fighter was still quite a primitive design and the reason it proceeded as a twin engined aircraft was down to the fact that these early jet were not overly powerful and rather slow to respond to the pilot's power input requests, so the use of two engines seemed practical. The view from the cockpit was however superb, with no propeller to obscure the pilots view and plenty of power available once the aircraft was up to speed. Undergoing almost constant development, the early marks of Meteor were all based around the first aircraft to enter service, however, the service arrival of the F.8 variant in 1950 saw the Meteor maturing into a truly exceptional early jet, one which would not only see service with the RAF, but also with several other air arms across the world. Slightly longer than its predecessors, the F.8 featured uprated engines, greater fuel capacity and the inclusion of an ejector seat. To counter some instability issues discovered during development, the new aircraft also featured a redesigned tail unit, something which really serves to identify this later mark of Meteor.

For five years following the squadron introduction of the Meteor F.8, the aircraft formed the backbone of the RAF's fighter defence force, a jet powered equivalent to the Spitfire's which patrolled Britain's skies during the Battle of Britain just ten years earlier.

de Havilland D.H.82a Tiger Moth
£23.99
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A04104 - de Havilland D.H.82a Tiger Moth

Even though the classic de Havilland Tiger Moth has to be considered one of the most important aircraft in the history of British aviation, it rarely receives the popular respect it deserves and is usually in the shadow of more glamourous types, such as the Supermarine Spitfire and de Havilland's own Mosquito. Despite this, without the availability of thousands of Tiger Moths to train a constant stream of pilots for military and civilian service, Britain and her Commonwealth would have been in real trouble during WWII and most pilots who would go on to fly the numerous Allied aircraft types of the Second World War would have learnt their trade on this classic training aircraft.


Coming from a successful line of biplane designs, the DH.82 Tiger Moth made its first flight in October 1931 and was the result of the Companys founder wanting to produce an aircraft superior to its predecessors, whilst possessing enough appeal to attract interest from several different aviation sectors. Its success resulted in an immediate order from the RAF, who viewed the aircraft as an ideal primary trainer for pilots beginning on their flying careers and destined to fly their latest front line aircraft. Their modest original order was followed up by several subsequent orders and as the world descended into conflict in 1939, the Royal Air Force would have around 500 Tiger Moths on strength. Many more examples were owned by flying clubs all over the country and many of these would also being pressed into military service, due to the need to train as many new pilots as possible.


With its growing reputation, the aircraft also secured many overseas orders, ensuring that the de Havilland production lines were fully committed in supplying this superb aircraft. From the perspective of the student pilot, the Tiger Moth was a relatively stable and forgiving aircraft to fly, with few handling vices and generally supportive of the odd silly mistake. It has been described as an easy aeroplane to fly but a difficult one to fly well, which seemed to have made this the ideal aircraft to serve as a primary/basic trainer for large numbers of future pilots destined for the war effort. As Britain prepared for invasion during the early summer of 1940, there were plans for the gentle natured Tiger Moth to show a much more aggressive side and support the Spitfire and Hurricane pilots they had previously trained. Operation Banquet called for the use of every available aircraft in the defence of Britains coastline, attacking any potential invasion force by all means at their disposal. This would see even the most unlikely of aircraft equipped with bomb racks and given a new offensive capability. Should a German invasion have been attempted, there would have been the very real possibility of swarms of bomb laden Tiger Moths raining fury on the enemy troops below, as Britain used every means in her power to ensure the failure of such a cross channel incursion.


Thankfully, due in no small part to the qualities of this effective pilot maker and the resolve of the Royal Air Force, German invasion plans were indefinitely postponed following the Luftwaffe's inability to score a decisive victory during the Battle of Britain. With many Tiger Moths remaining in airworthy condition, it is interesting to consider that this famous basic training aircraft is still doing the same job today as it did during its service introduction in the 1930s. The magnificent Tiger Moth allows potential Warbird pilots the opportunity to gain valuable experience flying a taildragger aircraft, before eventually moving on to display the Spitfires and Mustangs which thrill the crowds at Airshows all over the world.


BAE SYSTEMS is a registered trade mark of BAE Systems plc.



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