Airfix Scale Models


Airfix Scale Models

All products on the Airfix website.

Apollo Saturn V
£54.99
Out of Stock

A11170 - Apollo Saturn V

The Saturn V was the largest operational launch vehicle ever produced standing over 363 feet high with its Apollo Spacecraft payload, it produced over 7.5 million pounds of thrust at lift-off. It enabled the crew of Apollo 11 and subsequent Apollo crews to leave the pull of the Earth's gravity and reach the moon. Developed at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center under the direction of Wernher von Braun, was the largest in a family of liquid propellant rockets that solved the problem of getting to the moon. The three stage rocket was taller than a 36-story building and was the largest, most powerful rocket ever built.


A total of thirty-two Saturns of all types were launched; with not one failing. Thirteen of these were Vs. With a cluster of five powerful engines in each of the first two stages and using high-performance liquid hydrogen fuel for the upper stages, the Saturn V was one of the great feats of the 20th century engineering. Inside, the rocket contained three million parts in a labyrinth of fuel lines, pumps, gauges, sensors, curcuits, and switches - each of which had to function reliably. The first manned Saturn V sent the Apollo 8 astronauts into orbit around the moon in December 1968. After two more missions to test the Lunar Module, in July 1969 a Saturn V launched the crew of Apollo 11 to the first manned landing on the moon.

Supermarine Spitfire Mk1a
£59.99
Out of Stock

A12001V - Supermarine Spitfire Mk1a

The immortal Spitfire was the most famous fighter of the Second World War and one of the greatest warplanes of all time. When the Battle of Britain began in the summer of 1940 there were nineteen squadrons of Spitfires in action. The two Spitfires for which markings are supplied represent different moments of the battle as it raged from the hot summer days into the cold winter of 1940. The first is the iconic DW-K of No.610 County of Chester Squadron, with its large code letters and oversized roundels that instantly evoke the Battle of Britain. Based at Biggin Hill, DW-K was initially believed to be P9495 (included in this kit) which joined the squadron in June 1940 and was eventually damaged in a dogfight with a Messerschmitt 109 in August 1940, with the codes then transferred to another Spitfire.


The other aircraft is X4561, QJ-B of No.92 Squadronbased at Manston, Kent, December 1940 and reflects the changes to operational camouflage at the time with the underside of the port wing being painted black as a recognition aid. This fabulous model will show the cockpit, Merlin engine, gun ports and other great detail.


BAE SYSTEMS is a registered trade mark of BAE Systems plc.

Messerschmitt Bf109E
£59.99
In Stock

A12002V - Messerschmitt Bf109E

Designed by Professor Willy Messerschmitt, a director of the manufacturers Bayerische Flugzeuwerke AG, the prototype Bf109A first flew in 1935. The first major production variant, the Bf109E, was introduced into Luftwaffe service in December 1938. The E model was more powerful, better armed and armoured and by the summer of 1940, over 500 were in service for the offensive against Great Britain. By this time, the 109E had already proved to be a competent, if not the world's best, fighter aircrafts in the skies above Poland, France and the Low Countries.


The 109E became a symbol of the Luftwaffe over England during the Battle of Britain and along with the Supermarine Spitfire and Hawker Hurricane, it became one of the most famous fighter aircraft of all time. In the skies over Southern England in 1940, the 109E first had its shortcomings exposed. Its range was limited, with endurance over London being just five minutes. It was also unable to turn with either the Spitfire or the Hurricane, although its cannon armament was superior. It later served on the Eastern Front as well as over the Western Desert.

Gloster Javelin
£72.49
In Stock

A12007 - Gloster Javelin

The Gloster Javelin was developed in the 1950s as a two-seat, all weather interceptor. Serving with the RAF during the late 1950s and much of the 1960s, the Javelin was the last aircraft to bear the Gloster name. A distinctive fighter, the Javelin was equipped with a broad delta wing and a large finned T-Tail. Its cannons were placed in the wing, harking back to an earlier era of fighter development, but its missile armament was cutting edge.


Progressing through 9 marks in a short career, the Javelin had a troubled development, with its only action coming during the Malayan campaign from 1963-1966.

Handley Page Victor B.2
£72.49
Pre Order

A12008 - Handley Page Victor B.2

The Handley Page (HP) Victor was a jet-powered, strategic bomber which, alongside the other 'V' bombers, the Avro Vulcan and Vickers Valiant, formed an essential part of Britain's nuclear deterrent during the early part of the Cold War. The Victor was designed to carry out long-range, low-altitude attacks, but was later relegated to an aerial refuelling role when it was no longer deemed effective as a strategic bomber. Subject to the RAF's requirements for greater tactical manoeuvrability and a higher ceiling, the B.2 variant with much more powerful Rolls Royce Conway engines was developed in 1959. Thirty-four were produced in total, of which several were later converted for reconnaissance and aerial refuelling purposes. Two RAF squadrons formed on the B.2 after it entered service in 1962, but it was soon succeeded by the B.2R, a conversion which allowed 'Blue Steel' nuclear missiles to be carried in addition to free-fall nuclear payloads. Following the introduction of submarine-launched Polaris missiles in 1969, the Victor was gradually relieved of its role as a nuclear deterrent but it remained a valuable asset to the RAF as a tanker up to its retirement in 1993.

Avro Vulcan B.2
£72.49
In Stock

A12011 - Avro Vulcan B.2

Occupying a significant position in the history of post war British aviation, the Avro Vulcan was without doubt one of the most distinctive aircraft ever to take to the skies, with its huge delta wing profile becoming almost as iconic as the elliptical wing of the Supermarine Spitfire. Built to satisfy an extremely demanding Air Ministry requirement for a fast, high altitude strategic bomber, capable of carrying a special payload of 10,000 imperial pounds in weight (a nuclear device), the new aircraft was intended to serve as an airborne deterrent to any future military threat against the UK, with the required specifications representing a 100% increase in the capabilities of any previous British bomber aircraft. When the Vulcan made its maiden flight in August 1952, the Avro team were well on the way to presenting the Royal Air Force with not only the worlds first delta bomber, but also one of the worlds most effective strike bombers.


Interestingly, all this was achieved just nine years since the Avro Lancasters of RAF No.617 Squadron had launched their famous raid against the great dams of the Ruhr Valley. As the Avro Vulcan entered squadron service with No.83 Squadron at RAF Waddington in July 1957, Britain now possessed the fastest nuclear capable bomber in the world. It seems strange to describe an aircraft which possessed such potential for untold destruction as Britains most effective peace keeping asset, however, that is exactly what the Vulcan turned out to be. Throughout the aggressive posturing of the Cold War, the Warsaw Pact nations were in no doubt that if they dared to launch an attack against a NATO member country, the consequences of the inevitable retaliatory strike would be catastrophic. Without Doubt, during the early years of its service career, nothing represented this doomsday scenario more effectively than the mighty Avro Vulcan.


As the Royal Air Force exhaustively trained their new Vulcan crews to provide Britain with an effective Quick Reaction Alert strike force, Avro engineers were already working to improve the capabilities of their original, iconic design. In order to ensure the aircraft continued to maintain its effective deterrent threat and stayed one step ahead of advances in Easter Bloc fighter and surface-to-air missile technology, designers incorporated developments which endowed the aircraft with greater range, speed and altitude performance. The installation of more powerful versions of the Vulcans Bristol Olympus engines would result in a number of unforeseen stability issues with these first bombers, which concerned designers enough to necessitate a re-design of the original wing shape.


By the time the definitive B.2 variant of the Vulcan entered service, the aircrafts wing area had increased significantly and although still classed as a delta, would look quite different from the first bombers which entered service. To cope with the increased power availability from subsequent engine upgrades and to cure the instability issues of the original straight wing design, the B.2 wing had two defined kinks in its leading edge, well forward of the profile of the original wing design. Rather than detract from the pleasing aesthetics of the early Vulcans delta wing, the B.2 actually enhanced the profile of the aircraft and even though these changes were obviously made for reasons of operational effectiveness, as opposed to appearance, the B.2 would go on to be considered the most famous (and most numerous) of all the RAFs Vulcans. The service introduction of the Vulcan B.2 in July 1960 coincided with the availability of more capable nuclear weapons for the V-bomber force, both in number and destructive potential. It would also bring about a change in thinking regarding the delivery of such weapons, as significant advances in Soviet anti-aircraft technology now threatened the success of a free-fall gravity bomb mission. A significant new weapon would have to be developed in order to maintain the deterrent threat of the Vulcan and its V-bomber partners.


Developed to maintain the validity of Britain's nuclear deterrent threat, designers at Avro produced the powerful Blue Steel air-launched, nuclear stand-off missile, which would allow V-bomber crews to launch their attacks 100 miles away from their intended target and out of the range of Soviet surface-to-air missile batteries, allowing crews valuable additional time to avoid the resultant blast. Further boosting the effectiveness of the V-bomber force, the arrival of Blue Steel raised the nuclear stakes in Britains favour once more and would have caused much consternation amongst the Warsaw Pact nations.


The responsibility of providing Britain's strategic nuclear deterrent passed

Blackburn Buccaneer S.2
£72.49
Pre Order

A12012 - Blackburn Buccaneer S.2

A mighty naval strike aircraft which can trace its origins back to Britain's response to a massive naval expansion programme by the Soviet Navy in the 1950s and the introduction of their Sverdlov Class Cruisers, the Blackburn Buccaneer was designed to have exceptional low altitude performance and the ability to effectively neutralise this new naval threat. Required to operate from the relatively confined space aboard one of Britain's aircraft carriers, this subsonic strike jet was the most capable aircraft of its kind in the world and a real triumph for Britain's aviation industry - it also happened to be the heaviest aircraft ever operated by the Royal Navy.

In order to allow its effective operation at sea, the Buccaneers design not only included the ability to fold its wings, but also the nose (radar housing) and rear speed brake could be folded back and split open respectively, allowing for more effective carrier stowage, whilst maintaining the aerodynamic integrity of the aircraft. Entering Royal Navy service in July 1962, there were no two seat trainer versions of the Buccaneer, so even though the pilot would have had the benefit of several flights as a back seat observer in the new aircraft, his first flight as pilot would therefore be his Buccaneer solo. Thankfully, the Blackburn designers included many hi-tech automated features in the Buccaneer's roomy cockpit, all of which were intended to reduce pilot workload.

There is something aviation enthusiasts find particularly fascinating about the operation of aircraft at sea and the intrepid aviators who flew aeroplanes from the heaving decks of aircraft carriers under steam, particularly when aviation entered the jet age. The unforgiving nature of these operations dictated that naval aircraft had to be extremely tough, in addition to being capable of carrying out the mission for which they were required, attributes the Blackburn Buccaneer possessed in abundance. 

The introduction of the S.2 variant of the aircraft in late 1965 saw a major upgrade of the Buccaneer's capabilities, but centred around the adoption of a new powerplant, the famous Rolls Royce Spey turbofan. Possessing greater thrust and increased range, the Buccaneer S.2 was an even more capable naval strike aircraft and one which must have struck fear into the hearts of every Soviet naval commander. With its increased power, the S.2 was now able to land back on its home carrier with one engine shut down if required, but still having enough thrust to safely go around again, should the aircraft fail to catch the arrestor hook.

The Buccaneers of No.800 Naval Air Squadron were famously involved in the destruction of the stricken oil tanker Torrey Canyon, off Land's End in March 1967, as the government attempted to avert an environmental catastrophe by breaking open the vessel and burning its flammable cargo. Operating from RAF Brawdy, eight Buccaneers from No.800 NAS dropped 42,000 lbs of high explosive bombs on the tanker, achieving an impressive 75% success rate.

Panzer IV Ausf.H Mid Version
£45.99
In Stock

A1351 - Panzer IV Ausf.H Mid Version

The German medium tank Panzerkampfwagen IV was developed in the late 1930s and was used extensively during WWII. The production of the Panzer IV Ausf. H started in June 1943. This version was designated the Sd. Kfz. 161/2. Compared to the previous variants, this model had Zimmerit paste on all the vertical surfaces of its armour in order to prevent adhesion of magnetic anti-tank mines.


The turret roof was reinforced from 10mm to 16 and 25mm segments. 5mm hull skirts and 8mm turret skirts were added for further protection, which resulted in the elimination of the vision ports on the hull side. Later on, the hull was also fitted with triangular supports for the easily damaged side skirts. Along with some other modifications, these additions to the design increased the tank's weight to 25 tonnes, and the maximum speed dropped to 16 km/h on cross country terrain.

Panther G
£51.99
In Stock

A1352 - Panther G

On 3rd April 1944, M.A.N. reported that it had successfully completed trial production runs of the new Ausf.G chassis. M.A.N. built about 1143 Panther Ausf.G tanks between March 1944 and April 1945. Between July 1944 to March 1945 M.N.H. constructed 806 Panther Ausf.G tanks.


Daimler-Benz finished 1004 Panther Ausf.G tanks between May 1944 and April 1945. There were some minor differences between factory built tanks. M.N.H. fitted a cast steel Gleitschuh skid shoes instead of a rubber tire return roller behind the front track drive sprocket. The other two factories continued to fit rubber rimmed return rollers.

JagdPanzer 38 tonne Hetzer, Late Version
£34.49
In Stock

A1353 - JagdPanzer 38 tonne Hetzer, Late Version

The Jagdpanzer 38(t) (Sd.Kfz. 138/2), later known as Hetzer (baiter), was a German light tank destroyer of the Second World War based on a modified Czechoslovakian Panzer 38(t) chassis. The project was inspired by the Romanian Mareºall tank destroyer. The name Hetzer was at the time not commonly used for this vehicle. It was the designation for a related prototype, the E-10.


The Skoda factory, for a very short period, confused the two names in its documentation and the very first unit equipped with the vehicle thus for a few weeks applied the incorrect name until matters were cleared. However, there exists a memorandum from Heinz Guderian to Hitler claiming that an unofficial name, Hetzer, had spontaneously been coined by the troops. Post-war historians basing themselves on this statement made the name popular in their works, the vehicle was never named as such in official documents.

Tiger-1 Early Version - Operation Citadel
£36.49
In Stock

A1354 - Tiger-1 Early Version - Operation Citadel

Following their disastrous defeat at Stalingrad during the winter of 1942-43, the German armed forces launched a major offensive in the East known as Operation Citadel on July 4th, 1943. The climax of Operation Citadel, the Battle of Kursk, involved as many as 6,000 tanks, 4,000 aircraft and 2 million fighting men and is remembered as the greatest tank battle in history.


The peak of the battle was the massive armour engagement at Prochorovka, which began on July 12th. Prochorovka is one of the best-known of the many battles on the Eastern Front during World War II. Tiger heavy tanks with deadly 88mm cannons, lumbered forward while hundreds of nimble Soviet T-34 medium tanks raced into the midst of the SS armour and threw the Germans into confusion. The Soviets closed with the Panzers, negating the Tigers 88mm guns, outmanouvered the German armour and knocked out hundreds of German tanks.


The Soviet tank forces audacious tactics resulted in a disastrous defeat for the Germans, and the disorganised SS divisions withdrew, leaving 400 destroyed tanks behind, including between 70 and 100 Tigers and many Panthers. Those losses smashed the SS divisions fighting power, and as a result Hoths Fourth Panzer Army had no chance to achieve even a partial victory in the south of the Soviet Union. After receiving the news of the Allied invasion of Sicily, as well as reports of impending Soviet attacks on the Mius River and at Izyum, Hitler decided to cancel Operation Citadel. From then on the German forces were on the back-foot and the war had now turned against them.

JagdPanzer 38 tonne Hetzer Early Version
£42.49
In Stock

A1355 - JagdPanzer 38 tonne Hetzer Early Version

The Jagdpanzer 38 (Sd.Kfz. 138/2), later known as Hetzer ("baiter"), was a German light tank destroyer of the Second World War based on a modified Czechoslovakian Panzer 38(t) chassis. The project was inspired by the Romanian "Mareºall" tank destroyer. The Jagdpanzer 38 was intended to be more cost-effective than the much more ambitious Jagdpanther and Jagdtiger designs of the same period.


Using a proven chassis, it avoided the mechanical problems of the larger armoured vehicles. It was built on the Panzerkampfwagen 38(t)s widened and lengthened chassis with modified suspension (larger road-wheels from Praga TNH n.A prototype reconnaissance tank) and up-rated engine. The new engine was 160 PS Praga AC/2 6-cylinder engine controlled by Praga-Wilson gearbox (5 forward and 1 reverse gear). Chassis was modified in order to accommodate larger gun and thicker armour than regular Panzerkampfwagen 38(t) tank. Its combat weight was 16 metric tons (versus 9.8-tonnes for the Pz 38(t) and it could travel at maximum speed of some 42 km/h.

Tiger 1, Early Production Version
£36.49
In Stock

A1357 - Tiger 1, Early Production Version

Production of the Tiger I began in August 1942 at the factory of Henschel und Sohn in Kassel, initially at a rate of 25 per month and peaking in April 1944 at 104 per month. 1,355 had been built by August 1944, when production ceased. Deployed Tiger I's peaked at 671 on 1 July 1944. It took about twice as long to build a Tiger I as another German tank of the period.


When the improved Tiger II began production in January 1944, the Tiger I was soon phased out. Eager to make use of the powerful new weapon, Hitler ordered the vehicle be pressed into service months earlier than had planned. A platoon of four Tigers went into action on 23rd September 1942 near Leningrad. Operating in swampy, forested terrain, their movement was largely confined to roads and tracks, making defence against them far easier.


Many of these early models were plagued by problems with the transmission, which had difficulty handling the great weight of the vehicle if pushed too hard. It took time for drivers to learn how to avoid overtaxing the engine and transmission, and many broke down. The most significant event from this engagement was that one of the Tigers became stuck in swampy ground and had to be abandoned. Captured largely intact, it enabled the Soviets to study the design and prepare countermeasures.

M3 Stuart
£26.99
Out of Stock

A1358 - M3 Stuart "Honey"

The British named the M3 "General Stuart" upon receipt of the tank under the Lend-Lease program in June of 1941. The tank's ability to "shoot and scoot" as well as keeping the crew safe from small fire arms fire, earned an affectionae nickname of "Honey" by its operators. The British cavalry men liked this tank as it could travel 10 to 20 mph faster than their own or enemy tanks, and for its ease of maintenance.


The M3s were designed to replace the outdated M2s. The M3 incorporated a thicker armor, lengthened hull, and a trailer idler wheel to act as another road wheel to decrease ground pressure and improve weight distribution. The M3 turret had three pistol ports and shortened recoil mechanism. It was also equipped waith a 37mm M6 gun, which was adequate early in the war, but by 1942, the German counterparts far surpassed the range of the M3. The narrow width of the M3 could not accommodate a larger gun.


The M3A1 was fitted with a Westinghouse gyrostabilizer, a turret basket and an oil gear hydrolic traverse mechanism, but lacked a turret cupola. The earlier version of the M3A1, the Stuart III, was powered by Continental W-970-9A-7 cylinder radial gas 250 hp engine but by mid 1941, the Stuart IVs came off the production lines with Guiberson T-1020 air cooled radial diesel engine.

M10 GMC Tank Destroyer
£44.99
In Stock

A1360 - M10 GMC Tank Destroyer

The American M10 tank destroyer served during WWII. After the US entry into World War II and the formation of the Tank Destroyer Force, a suitable vehicle was needed to equip the new battalions. By November 1941, the Army requested a vehicle with a gun in a fully rotating turret after previous models were criticised for being too poorly designed.


The prototype of the M10 was developed in early 1942, and was delivered in April of that year. After requested changes to the hull and turret, the modified version was readied for production in June 1943, appearing as the 3-inch Gun Motor Carriage M10. It mounted a 3-inch (76.2 mm) Gun M7 in a rotating turret on a modified M4A2 Sherman tank chassis.


Productions ran from September 1942 to December 1943. The M10 was numerically the most important U.S. tank destroyer of World War II. It combined thin but sloped armor with the M4 Sherman's reliable drivetrain and a reasonably potent anti-tank weapon mounted in an open-topped turret. Despite its obsolescence in the face of more powerful German tanks like the Panther and the introduction of more powerful and better-designed types as replacements, the M10 remained in service until the end of the war.

T34-85 112 Factory Production
£38.99
In Stock

A1361 - T34-85 112 Factory Production

When the first T-34-85s (85mm gun) delivered by Zavod #112 appeared, they were given to the best units, the elite Red Guards battalions. However, they were in training during December 1943, so it is uncertain whether they saw action before January or February 1944.


By then, around 400 had already been delivered to front-line units and instantly became popular with the crews. They gradually replaced the T-34/76 and in mid-1944 the T-34-85 outnumbered the older versions. By then they formed the bulk of the tank units on the eve of Operation Bagration, the Soviet response to the Allied landings in Normandy, and the biggest offensive ever planned by the Red Army to date. This was the final push, aimed at Berlin. Before the production built-up, the T-34-85 model 1943 were usually given to chosen crews, usually of the Guard units.

German Light Tank Pz.Kpfw.35(t)
£32.99
In Stock

A1362 - German Light Tank Pz.Kpfw.35(t)

The Panzerkampfwagen 35(t), commonly shortened to Panzer 35(t) or abbreviated as Pz.Kpfw. 35(t), was a Czechoslovakian designed light tank used mainly by Nazi Germany during World War II. The letter (t) stood for tschechisch (German: "Czech"). In Czechoslovakian service it had the formal designation Lehký tank vzor 35 (Light Tank Model 35), but was commonly referred to as the LT vz. 35 or LT-35. A total of 434 were built; of these, the Germans seized 244 when they occupied Bohemia-Moravia in March 1939 and the Slovaks acquired 52 when they declared independence from Czechoslovakia at the same time. Others were exported to Bulgaria and Romania.


In German service, it saw combat during the early years of World War II, notably the invasion of Poland, the Battle of France and the invasion of the Soviet Union before being retired or sold off in 1942; the fighting in Russia having exposed the vehicle's unsuitability for cold weather operations and general unreliability. This weakness, in addition to their thin armour and inadequate firepower, resulted in the 6th Panzer Division being re-equipped with other more powerful German tanks on its withdrawal from Russia in April 1942.

Tiger-1
£42.49
In Stock

A1363 - Tiger-1 "Early Version"

Production of the Tiger I began in August 1942 at the factory of Henschel und Sohn in Kassel, initially at a rate of 25 per month and peaking in April 1944 at 104 per month. 1,355 had been built by August 1944, when production ceased. Deployed Tiger I's peaked at 671 on 1 July 1944. It took about twice as long to build a Tiger I as another German tank of the period.


When the improved Tiger II began production in January 1944, the Tiger I was soon phased out. Eager to make use of the powerful new weapon, Hitler ordered the vehicle be pressed into service months earlier than had planned. A platoon of four Tigers went into action on 23rd September 1942 near Leningrad. Operating in swampy, forested terrain, their movement was largely confined to roads and tracks, making defence against them far easier.


Many of these early models were plagued by problems with the transmission, which had difficulty handling the great weight of the vehicle if pushed too hard. It took time for drivers to learn how to avoid overtaxing the engine and transmission, and many broke down. The most significant event from this engagement was that one of the Tigers became stuck in swampy ground and had to be abandoned. Captured largely intact, it enabled the Soviets to study the design and prepare countermeasures.

Tiger-1
£50.99
In Stock

A1364 - Tiger-1 "Late Version"

Now you can build really big model Tanks thanks to Airfix's new range. These are big 1:35 scale models. Once complete, from gun tip to rear exhaust youll have a model stretching 41cm across your workbench. The kit comprises the hull, turret and running gear as youd expect. However, this kit includes a set of interior details!


You can leave the model with a turret ready to lift off and show off your surprise the detailed interior! The initial range of 1:35 kits from Airfix features over a dozen classic Tanks the Tiger being an obvious choice to start of your modelling in 1:35 scale.


This kit includes 15 sprues of plastic parts for you to assemble and paint, plus additional items for the vinyl components. There is even a detailed set of etched engine grills included. Add to this a new and fully researched assembly manual, decal sheet and two paint schemes. You'll get hours of enjoyment from this large-scale model Tank.

M4A3(76)W
£36.49
In Stock

A1365 - M4A3(76)W "Battle of the Bulge"

The Chrysler Corporation began producing the M4A3(76) in March 1944. Many of their first units arrived almost simultaneously in France Italy in August 1944. It, like all the Shermans saw a steady flow of minor improvements, and versions of this tank with HVSS (horizontal volute spring suspension) started arriving in December of 1944, just prior to the Axis push into the Ardennes region, and would become increasingly common from that point on as replacement tanks entered the combat zone.


These tanks were very well received and the Ford GAA was a very good engine for a tank in the Sherman's weight range. The low RPM the motor matched the existing gear ratios in the transmission, and the motor mor than a match for the stresses most operations put it under. Once the HVSS suspension versions began replacing previous tanks, this really became the ultimate Sherman. The French 2nd Armored Division received a small number of M4A3(76)s just prior to their dash to liberate Paris. They were probably the first to use this model in combat.



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