Transport - Vintage Airfix


Transport Reference books

All these titles are available to purchase from Pen and Sword.

Contents:
- Joseph Locke - By Anthony Burton..
- King's Cross Second Man - By Norman Hill..
- L M S Locomotive Design and Development - By Tim Hillier-Graves..
- Last Years of the London Titan - By Matthew Wharmby..
- Lawrie Bond Microcar Man - By Nick Wotherspoon..
- Leicester's Trams and Buses - By Andrew H Bartlett..
- Locomotive Builders of Leeds - By Mark Smithers..
- Locomotive Portraits - By Jonathan Clay..
- London Buses 1970-1980 - By John Laker, Matthew Wharmby..
- London Buses in the 1970s - By Jim Blake..
- London Buses in the 1970s - 1970-1974: From Division to Crisis - By Jim Blake..
- London Local Trains in the 1950s and 1960s - By Kevin McCormack..
- London Transport's Last Buses - By Matthew Wharmby..
- London's Railways 1967 - 1977 - By Jim Blake..
- London's Transport Recalled - By Martin Jenkins, Charles Roberts..

 


 

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Joseph Locke

By Anthony Burton

Joseph LockeDescription:

Most historians recognise the work of three engineers as being the men who developed the railways from slow, lumbering colliery lines into fast, inter-city routes. Two are very well known: Robert Stephenson and Isambard Kingdom Brunel. The third was Joseph Locke, who should be recognised for having made a contribution just as great as that of the other two.

The Locke family had been colliery managers and overseers for many generations and Joseph, once he had completed his very rudimentary education at Barnsley Grammar School at the age of thirteen, seemed set to follow in their footsteps. However, at the age of nineteen he was taken on as an apprentice by an old friend of his father, George Stephenson, and sent to the new locomotive works at Newcastle. His enthusiasm and willingness to learn soon brought promotion, and he became a highly valued assistant engineer on the prestigious Liverpool & Manchester Railway.

During his time there he wrote a pamphlet with Robert Stephenson, arguing the case for steam locomotives and had the embarrassing task of having to correct calculations for a tunnel being built under the direct supervision of George Stephenson. After its opening, he moved on to work on the Grand Junction Railway, at the start working alongside Stephenson rather than as his assistant. But before long, they had quarrelled and the directors handed the whole works over to Lockes control. It was the turning point of his life.

Locke was to continue as chief engineer on some of the most important lines in Britain, and his reputation grew to the point where he was also in demand for work in mainland Europe, building major routes in France, the Netherlands and Spain. He became a wealthy man, purchasing the manor of Honiton in Devon and sat in Parliament as the Liberal member for that constituency. He received many honours during his lifetime and died while on holiday at Scotland in 1860 at the age of fifty-five.

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King's Cross Second Man

By Norman Hill

King's Cross Second ManDescription:

Late in 1964 the author made a career change from the Midland Region railway clerical grades, to the Eastern Region Motive Power Department at King's Cross, initially as a locomotive cleaner. This was the realisation of an ambition held for some ten years and by the end of December 1964, he became eligible for second man duties. On 28 December 1964, he was second man on a return trip to Peterborough, and determined to keep a record of the run; locomotive employed, the driver he accompanied, the rostered diagram and the actual circumstances of the diagram. Norman duly recorded this shift, along with all shifts worked during his employment as second man.

Norman realised that such a record would be of great interest to both railway enthusiasts and employees, past and present. Especially those who worked on the southern section of the East Coast Main Line or those with a special interest in the railways of the 1960s; a formative period of railway modernisation when 150 years of steam-powered railway locomotion gave way to more modern means of motive power. This book will use Norman's records of 1964-68 as a basis for an account in which he will show the slow and difficult transition of Britain's railway from its traditional steam-powered world into the modern world of diesel and electric traction.

Norman's work as second man took him to places and railway installations in North London that no longer exist, and which have taken their place in railway history, and sometimes even within the broader fabric of the history of London, and of England itself. Through the medium of Norman's records of 1960's railway working, he looks back and rediscovers these forgotten places and so contrasts nineteenth-century railways and industrial history with operating practices on todays modern British railways.

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L M S Locomotive Design and Development

By Tim Hillier-Graves

L M S Locomotive Design and DevelopmentDescription:

In 1958 one of Britain`s greatest locomotive designers died without public fanfare or recognition, mourned only by his family. Yet William Stanier, arguably one of our greatest engineers and his leader, said of him that without his Chief Draughtsman all he achieved with the LMS would not have been possible. How could such a man slip from our view and remain anonymous, although his Princess Coronations, Black 5s and 8Fs are regarded as three of the finest classes of locomotive ever built? And today many survive as stars to grace the ever growing preservation movement.

In reality, Tom Coleman was an intensely private and modest man who never sought recognition or commendation. His need for privacy may be one reason why his life has remained shrouded in mystery for so long, but finally his story has been slowly pieced together from a wide variety of sources, many previously untapped. So now we can see for ourselves his great contribution to railway history and recognise his singular talents.

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Last Years of the London Titan

By Matthew Wharmby

Last Years of the London TitanDescription:

Already depleted by withdrawals in the London Buses Ltd era, the Leyland Titan fleet of T class was divided upon privatisation between three new companies; London Central, Stagecoach East London and Stagecoach Selkent. Together with a host of smaller companies operating second-hand acquisitions, the Titans’ declining years between 1998 and 2003 are explored in this pictorial account that encompasses both standard day-to-day routes, emergency deployments and rail replacement services. Only small numbers remained to usher out the type altogether at the end of 2005, when step-entrance double-deckers as a whole were banished from the capital.

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Lawrie Bond Microcar Man

By Nick Wotherspoon

Lawrie Bond Microcar ManDescription:

Once a common sight on Britain's roads, few people today seem to have heard of the Bond Minicar not a diminutive, gadget laden conveyance for the fictional 007 character, but a popular, practical, motorcycle-engined, three-wheeler that in the post-war austerity period, gave tens of thousands of people affordable personal transport at a time when conventional vehicles were beyond the reach of the average household. Yet whilst the later, mostly imported, 'Bubble cars' have remained in the public eye, it is largely forgotten that the first of the post-war 'Microcars' to go into significant production was the British designed and built Bond.

Equally enigmatic seems to be the designer of this vehicle, Lawrence 'Lawrie' Bond a prolific automotive design genius, with a penchant for weight-saving construction techniques. He was responsible for a wide range of two, three and four wheel vehicles; from ultra-lightweight motorcycles and scooters, such as the Minibyke, Lilliput and Gazelle, as well as his other Microcars the stylish Berkeley and perhaps less-than-pretty Opperman Unicar and finally to his later work, including the innovative, but troubled Bond 875 and styling the Equipe GT sportscar.

Here the story is told in full, covering all Lawrie's innovative designs and the various vehicles that bore his name, all in prolifically illustrated detail, together with his passion for motor racing, which resulted in a number of technically acclaimed racing cars, some of which can still be seen competing is historic racing events today.

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Leicester's Trams and Buses

By Andrew H Bartlett

Leicester's Trams and BusesDescription:

In 1904, when Leicester Corporation opened its state-of-the-art electric tram network, it enjoyed a monopoly on routes and convenient central terminal points. But soon the first small independent motor bus companies became active, and by 1921, Midland Red – shortly to be the largest operator in England outside London – was busily establishing itself. The city fathers were faced with a quandary; protecting their territory and services, and possibly extending them, albeit in the face of determined competition, whilst at the same time endeavouring to provide termini that were as invitingly close to the city centre as possible. In this they were assisted by the 1930 Transport Act, which provided the template for fifty years of fairly peaceful co-existence between Leicester City Transport and Midland Red. That is until the provisions of a new Act in 1980 set them at loggerheads again.

Leicester’s Trams and Buses – 20th Century Landmarks examines in detail the background behind five key events – the opening of the electric tram network in 1904 and its closure in 1949; the arrival of Midland Red in Leicester in 1921, via the protracted planning for Leicester’s first proper bus station, to the so-called bus wars in the deregulation and privatisation era of the 1980s. It concludes that it was the pursuit of policies, at local and national government levels, which ultimately led to opportunities being missed that could have provided Leicester city and county with a fully integrated modern-day network.

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Locomotive Builders of Leeds

By Mark Smithers

Locomotive Builders of LeedsDescription:

The history of commercial railway locomotive manufacture in the Leeds is a fascinating story, covering a period of nearly two centuries, which commenced during the Napoleonic period and only came to an end in 1995. The two companies that most epitomised the formative years and period of consolidation of this this part of Britains industrial history were E.B. Wilson & Co (1846-59) and Manning Wardle & Co (1858-1927).

The former manufacturer was well known for the Jenny Lind locomotives and their derivative designs used on several British main lines during the mid-nineteenth century. They proved to have a profound influence upon the work of other manufacturers for main line needs.

The latter company was a builder of contractors and industrial locomotives, used worldwide, whose mainstream designs were likewise highly influential upon the work of neighbouring manufacturers, constituting a sphere of locomotive production that lasted from before the Crimean War until after the end of the Second World War.

In this new work, Mark Smithers draws upon a variety of sources, both documentary and illustrative, to arrive at an up-to date appraisal of the achievements of these companies during their respective periods of production, and their legacy to the greater sphere of British railway locomotive development.

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Locomotive Portraits

By Jonathan Clay

Locomotive PortraitsDescription:

Whilst ever there have been railways there have been artists keen to paint them. Many famous names have included aspects of the railways in their paintings, including most notably Claude Monet and J M W Turner. This enthusiasm has been kept alive by the formation in the UK of the Guild of Railway Artists, of which there are over two hundred members including the author of this work. In recent years Jonathan Clay has had many requests to produce his own book of pictures and Locomotive Portraits is the result.

Jonathan discovered his own unique style by happy accident - in order to save time for his first railway event in 1999, he painted a series of locomotive pictures without backgrounds, intending to add the scenery later. However, they sold so well that they became the norm and his well-known series of Locomotive Portraits was born.

Containing over a 170 pages of stunning artwork, this book is a treat for rail and art lovers alike.

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London Buses 1970-1980

By John Laker, Matthew Wharmby

London Buses 1970-1980Description:

The 1970s were among London Transport’s most troubled years. Prohibited from designing its own buses for the gruelling conditions of the capital, LT was compelled to embark upon mass orders for the broadly standard products of national manufacturers, which for one reason or another proved to be disastrous failures in the capital and were disposed of prematurely at a great loss. Despite a continuing spares shortage combined with industrial action, the old organisation kept going somehow, with the venerable RT and Routemaster families still at the forefront of operations.

At the same time, the green buses of the Country Area were taken over by the National Bus Company as London Country Bus Services. Little by little, and not without problems of their own, the mostly elderly but standard inherited buses gave way to a variety of diverted orders, some successful others far from so, until by the end of the decade we could see a mostly NBC-standard fleet of one-man-operated buses in corporate leaf green.

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London Buses in the 1970s

By Jim Blake

London Buses in the 1970sDescription:

Continuing with photographs from Jim Blake's extensive archives, this book examines the second half of the 1970s, when both London Transport and London Country were still struggling to keep services going. This resulted both from being plagued by a shortage of spare parts for their vehicles, and having a number of vehicle types which were unreliable the MB, SM and DMS classes.

In 1975, both operators had to hire buses from other companies, so desperate were they. Many came from the seaside towns of Southend, Bournemouth and Eastbourne. This continued until the spares shortage began to abate later in the decade, particularly with London Country.

As the decade progressed, the two fleets began to lose their 'ancestral' vehicle types. London Country rapidly became 'just another National Bus Company fleet', buying Leyland Atlanteans and Nationals common to most others throughout the country. Having virtually abandoned the awful MB and SM-types, London Transport had to suffer buying the equally awful DMSs well into 1978, but had already ordered replacements for them by that point the M class Metrobuses and T class Titans both of which would finally prove successful. However, plans to convert trunk routes serving Central London to one-person operation were largely abandoned.

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London Buses in the 1970s - 1970-1974: From Division to Crisis

By Jim Blake

London Buses in the 1970s - 1970-1974: From Division to CrisisDescription:

Using photographs from Jim Blake's extensive archives, this book examines the turbulent period in the history of London's buses immediately after London Transport lost its Country Buses and Green Line Coaches to the recently-formed National Bus Company, under their new subsidiary company, London Country Bus Services Ltd.

The new entity inherited a largely elderly fleet of buses from London Transport, notably almost 500 RT-class AEC Regent double-deckers, of which replacement was already under way in the shape of new AEC MB and SM class Swift single-deckers.

London Transport itself was in the throes of replacing a much larger fleet of these. At the time of the split, it was already apparent that the 36ft-long MB class single-deckers were not suitable for London conditions, particularly in negotiating suburban streets cluttered with cars, and were also mechanically unreliable. The shorter SM class superseded them, but they were equally unreliable. January 1971 saw the appearance of London Transport's first purpose-built one-man operated double-decker the DMS class. All manner of problems plagued these, too.

Both operators were also plagued with a shortage of spare parts for their vehicles, made worse by the three-day week imposed by the Heath regime in 1973-4. London Transport and London Country were still closely related, with the latter's buses continuing to be overhauled at LT's Aldenham Works. Such were the problems with the MB, SM and DMS types that LT not only had to resurrect elderly RTs to keep services going, but even repurchased some from London Country! In turn, the latter operator hired a number of MB-types from LT, now abandoned as useless, from 1974 onwards in an effort to cover their own vehicle shortages. Things looked bleak for both operators in the mid-1970s.

This book contains a variety of interesting and often unusual photographs illustrating all of this, most of which have never been published before.

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London Local Trains in the 1950s and 1960s

By Kevin McCormack

London Local Trains in the 1950s and 1960sDescription:

The picture below of a Castle class locomotive, since preserved, illustrates Kevin McCormack's first love: the Great Western Railway and the Western Region of British Railways. Living almost all his childhood on the Western in Ealing, it was perhaps inevitable that this was his favourite region, and he came to admire the copper-capped chimneys, brass safety value covers and brass nameplates and cabside number plates of its larger locomotives as well as the tall chimneys and large domes of its characteristic smaller engines. He had a particular liking for the diminutive 14XX 0-4-2 tanks that used to work the Ealing Broadway-Greenford push and pull services and when a fund was set up to preserve one, Kevin was quick to add his support, joining what became the Great Western Society and becoming its secretary in the late 1960s/early 1970s.

In 1973, Kevin cemented his interest in the GWR by acquiring a Victorian family saloon railway carriage, which had been converted into a Thameside bungalow.

Remarkably, the coach was largely original inside and the exterior well preserved as it was virtually encased within the house. Restoration has therefore been a comparatively easy task and the vehicle is displayed at the Great Western Society's base at the Didcot Railway Centre.

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London Transport's Last Buses

By Matthew Wharmby

London Transport's Last BusesDescription:

The Olympian was Leyland's answer to the competition that was threatening to take custom away from its second-generation OMO double-deck products. Simpler than the London Transportcentric Titan but, unlike that integral model, able to respond to the market by being offered as a chassis for bodying by the bodybuilder of the customer's choice, the Olympian was an immediate success and soon replaced both the Atlantean and Bristol VRT as the standard double-decker of the NBC. It wasn't until 1984 that London Transport itself dabbled with the model, taking three for evaluation alongside trios of contemporary double-deckers.The resulting L class spawned an order for 260 more in 1986, featuring accessibility advancements developed by LT in concert with the Ogle design consultancy, but the rapid changes engulfing the organisation meant that no more were ordered. During the 1990s company ownerships shifted repeatedly as the ethos of competition gave way to the cold reality of big business, an unstable situation which even saw London's bus operations broken up.The L class was split between three new companies, but the backlog of older vehicles to replace once corporate interests released funding ensured the buses up to a further decade in service. Finally, as low-floor buses swept into the capital at the turn of the century, Olympian operation at last declined, and the final examples operated early in 2006.

This profusely illustrated book describes the diversity of liveries, ownerships and deployments that characterised the London Leyland Olympians' two decades of service.

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London's Railways 1967 - 1977

By Jim Blake

London's Railways 1967 - 1977Description:

This lovingly-produced pictorial book covers London's railways from 1967 to 1977, showing the transition from steam to diesel and electric traction. Accompanied by a very readable narrative, telling tales of the authors adventures during his many trips around the London railway network, the volume encapsulates a fascinating period of time in Britain. During these ten years a great deal of change took place, not only with railways and transport, but also socially and economically in the wider world. Jim Blake eloquently describes all of these changes, whilst also looking in detail at the capital's transport scene of the period.

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London's Transport Recalled

By Martin Jenkins, Charles Roberts

London's Transport RecalledDescription:

The rich variety of transport in the London area – stretching out as far as the one time limit of London Transport’s green bus operation – is reflected in this colour album from Martin Jenkins and Charles Roberts. Both authors have long-standing connections with the Capital and, using mainly previously unpublished colour views from the period 1948-1969, have assembled a remarkable array of views covering all modes of transport. The reader is taken on a fascinating journey of discovery, not knowing what will be around the next corner encountering buses, trams and trolleybuses; main line steam, diesel and electric; London Transport electric and steam as well as little known industrial railways; activities on the Thames, in docks and on canals; liners, ferries and pleasure steamers; plus aviation and even a coal merchant’s horse drawn cart. The images have been selected wherever possible to show changing streetscapes, buildings and fashions and will appeal to those who remember the period as well as the London of today. The stunning colour reproduction brings the pictures to life, as do informative captions. The book is a tribute to those photographers who had the foresight to record scenes before they were swept away in the name of progress.

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