Transport - Vintage Airfix


Transport Reference books

All these titles are available to purchase from Pen and Sword.

Contents:
- Great Western Large Wheeled Outside Framed 4-4-0 Tender Locomotives - By David Maidment..
- Great Western Manor Class - By Laurence Waters..
- Great Western Moguls and Prairies - By David Maidment..
- Great Western Railway Gallery - By Laurence Waters..
- Great Western Saint Class Locomotives - By Laurence Waters..
- Great Western Small-Wheeled Double-Framed 4-4-0 Tender Locomotives - By David Maidment..
- Great Western Star Class Locomotives - By Laurence Waters..
- Great Western, County Classes - By David Maidment..
- Great Western, Grange Class Locomotives - By David Maidment..
- Hereford Locomotive Shed - By Steve Bartlett..
- Heritage Traction on the Main Line - By Fred Kerr..
- Images of Fred Dibnah - By Keith Langston..
- Images of Transport: Railway Disasters - By Simon Fowler..
- Irish Railways in the 1950s and 1960s - By Kevin McCormack..
- Isle of Man Transport: A Colour Journey in Time - By Martin Jenkins, Charles Roberts..

 


 

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Great Western Large Wheeled Outside Framed 4-4-0 Tender Locomotives

By David Maidment

Great Western Large Wheeled Outside Framed 4-4-0 Tender LocomotivesDescription:

This volume covers all the large wheeled outside frame classes, of 4-4-0 tender Locomotives, that once ran on the Great Western Railway.

The book has full details on each of the classes, with good quality pictures, diagrams name and number lists.

This work is also very useful to model makers, giving full details of mechanical and livery changes, that took place from the 1900s through to the early 1930s, when all except the preserved 3440, City of Truro, were withdrawn and scrapped.

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Great Western Manor Class

By Laurence Waters

Great Western Manor ClassDescription:

The 30 Manor class 4-6-0s were designed by CB Collett in 1938, and built by the Great Western, and the Western Region at Swindon in two batches, 20 in 1938/9, and 10 in 1950. In order to save money the first 20 members of the class were built using parts from withdrawn 4300 class 2-6-0s, and were coupled to refurbished Churchward 3,500 gallon tenders. The lighter 4-6-0s Manors were given ‘blue’ route classification which allowed them to work over many secondary lines.

The construction of the Manors completed the final stage of Collett’s plan to provide a full range of 4-6-0 tender locomotives for Great Western passenger services.

Over the years the Manors saw extensive use on services in the South West, West Wales and ex-Cambrian Lines in North Wales. They provided motive power for both the ‘Pembroke Coast Express’ and the ‘Cambrian Coast Express’. Many of the class lasted to the end of steam traction on the Western Region, with the last examples being withdrawn in November 1965. Remarkably of the original 30 members of the class no fewer than 9 have survived.

In this book, author Laurence Waters charts the history of the class from their construction at Swindon in 1938, right through to the final withdrawals in 1965. Using many previously unpublished black and white, and colour photographs, accompanied by informative captions, each member of the class is illustrated. This book should appeal to those interested in the history of Great Western Locomotive development as well as modellers of the Great Western and Western Region.

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Great Western Moguls and Prairies

By David Maidment

Great Western Moguls and PrairiesDescription:

Great Western Moguls & Prairies is a volume in Pen & Sword’s series, ‘Locomotive Portfolios’. It describes the conception, design, building and operation of the fleet of Prairie 2-6-2 tank engines and the Mogul 2-6-0s designed by Churchward in the early part of the twentieth century and perpetuated by his successor, Charles Collett, in the 1920s and 1930s. These engines formed the backbone of the GWR locomotive fleet for secondary passenger and freight work for over half a century and were some of those that remained to the end of steam traction on the Western Region of British Railways. The book also covers some of the lesser known Moguls developed in the Dean/Churchward transition at the end of the nineteenth century and briefly looks at the Mogul and Prairie designs proposed by Churchward, Collett and Hawksworth but were never built. The book is copiously illustrated with over 250 black and white and 60 coloured photographs and is a comprehensive record of a group of locomotives found throughout the Great Western and its successor, the Western Region, for over fifty years.

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By Laurence Waters

Great Western Railway GalleryDescription:

It could be agued that the great Western or 'Gods' Wonderful Railway' was for many years the most famous railway in England. Much of the railway that we see today was the work of probably one of the great engineers of his time, Isambard Kingdom Brunel. The company was also served by locomotive engineers such as Gooch, Armstrong, Churchward, Collett and Hawksworth, who between them produced a series of locomotives that were well designed, elegant and powerful.

Serving many holiday resorts of the south west, with trains such as 'The Cornish Riviera Express', the publicity department exploited to great effect the Great Western as the 'Holiday Line’. It is probably true to say that in the years before the Second World War the company was producing some of the most effective publicity material in England.

Using previously unpublished material from the extensive 'Great Western Trust' collection at Didcot Railway Centre, the book illustrates in both black and white and colour many facets that made the Great Western 'Great'.

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Great Western Saint Class Locomotives

By Laurence Waters

Great Western Saint Class LocomotivesDescription:

Churchward’s 2 cylinder Saint Class 4-6-0s were arguably one of the most important locomotive developments of the twentieth century. The seventy-seven members of the class were so successful that most of the other railway companies in this country used the same 2 cylinder 4-6-0 formula in the design of their own mixed traffic locomotives. Over the years the Saints saw a number of modifications, with many of the class passing into BR ownership. The last member of the class, no. 2920 Saint Martin, was withdrawn from service in 1953 and was sadly not preserved. However, the Great Western Society are now constructing a replica Saint at Didcot Railway Centre. Numbered 2999 it will be named Lady of Legend.

In this book author Laurence Waters charts the remarkable history of the class from the construction of the prototype Saint at Swindon in 1902, right through to the final withdrawals in 1953. Using many previously unpublished black and white photographs, accompanied by informative captions, each member of the class is illustrated. This book should appeal to those interested in the history of Great Western Locomotive development as well as modellers of the Great Western and Western Region.

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Great Western Small-Wheeled Double-Framed 4-4-0 Tender Locomotives

By David Maidment

Great Western Small-Wheeled Double-Framed 4-4-0 Tender LocomotivesDescription:

The Great Western Railway experienced the trauma and disruption of the end of the broad gauge in 1892 and were faced with equipping the network with suitable motive power, especially in Devon and Cornwall where the last track conversion had taken place. West of Newton Abbot, the GWR had relied on a variety of 4-4-0, 2-4-0, 0-4-2 and 0-4-4 side and saddle tanks, often doubled-headed, and Dean set about designing a sturdy outside-framed powerful 4-4-0 with 5ft 8in coupled wheels, the 'Dukes', to tackle increasing loads over the heavily graded main line. Then, Churchward came to assist the ailing Locomotive Superintendent, using his knowledge and experience of American and continental practice to develop the Dean designs. He improved the efficiency and performance of the boilers, using the Belgian Belpaire firebox, then developed the tapered 'cone' boiler, and applied it to the chassis of the 'Duke's to form the 'Camel' class, later known as the 'Bulldogs', which eventually numbered 156 locomotives. Finally, in the 1930s when engines of the 'Duke' route availability were still required but their frames were life-expired, their boilers were matched with the stronger frames of the 'Bulldogs' to form the 'Dukedog' class, which lasted until the 1950s, particularly on the former Cambrian lines in mid-Wales. This book recounts the design, construction and operation of these small-wheeled outside-framed locomotives with many rare photos of their operation in the first decade of the twentieth century as well as in more recent times.

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Great Western Star Class Locomotives

By Laurence Waters

Great Western Star Class LocomotivesDescription:

Designed by G.J. Churchward, no. 40 was constructed at Swindon in April 1906. It was Swindons first 4 cylinder simple engine and was the forerunner of Churchwards famous 4 cylinder Star Class 4-6-0s. Initially built as a 4-4-2 Atlantic, no. 40 was named North Star in September 1906, rebuilt as a 4-6-0 in 1909, and renumbered 4000 in 1913. Including no. 40, the Star class eventually numbered seventy-three locomotives, all built at Swindon in batches between 1906 and 1923.

In service the Stars proved to be both free-running and reliable locomotives, and for many years were used to haul the Great Westerns top link services, including the world-famous Cornish Riviera Express. The introduction of the Collett Castle Class 4-6-0s in 1923, and the King Class 4-6-0s in 1927, saw the Stars relegated to secondary passenger, freight and parcels services. A number of Stars were rebuilt by Collett as Castles, including the prototype no. 4000 North Star, but the remaining Stars continued to give good service. At Nationalisation in 1948, no less than forty-seven of these fine locomotives passed into Western Region ownership, the last example, no. 4056 Princess Margaret, being withdrawn in October 1957.

In this book, Laurence Waters charts the history of the class from the prototype, right through to the final workings in October 1957. Using many previously unpublished photographs from the Great Western Trust photographic collection, accompanied by informative captions, every member of the Class is illustrated. This book should appeal to those interested in the history of Great Western locomotive development as well as modellers of the Great Western and Western Region.

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Great Western, County Classes

By David Maidment

Great Western, County ClassesDescription:

The Great Western Railway had two classes of tender locomotives named after counties. The first class of two cylinder 4-4-0 tender locomotives, designed by George Jackson Churchward, were introduced in the 1900s to provide efficient motive power, including lines on the 'North & West' route between Hereford and Shrewsbury, owned jointly by the Great Western and L.N.W.R.

The 4-4-0 counties were in service until the early 1930s, when they were withdrawn and replaced by more modern motive power.

The 4-4-0 countie, were paralleled in design by the county 4-4-2 tanks, which operated suburban services in the London area and were also withdrawn in the early 1930s.

In 1945, the Great Western introduced the County 4-6-0 tender locomotives, designed by F W Hawksworth. These two cylinder machines had a high pressure boiler that was meant to give the same tractive effort as a Castle class 4-6-0 four cylinder locomotive,

After modifications and boiler pressure reduction, the County class 4-6-0s operated in express and semi fast train service, until the last members of the class were withdrawn in 1964.

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Great Western, Grange Class Locomotives

By David Maidment

Great Western, Grange Class LocomotivesDescription:

Churchward proposed a 5ft 8in wheeled 4-6-0 for mixed traffic duties in 1901 and it was seriously considered in 1905, but it took until 1936 before his successor, Charles Collett, realised the plan by persuading the GWR Board to replace many of the 43XX moguls with modern standard mixed traffic engines that bore a remarkable likeness to the Churchward proposal. David Maidment has written another in his series of ‘Locomotive Portfolios’ for Pen & Sword to coincide with the construction of a new ‘Grange’ at Llangollen from GW standard parts to fill the gap left by the total withdrawal and scrapping of one of that railway’s most popular classes – to their crews at the very least. As well as covering the type’s design and construction, the author deals comprehensively with the allocation and operation of the eighty locomotives and in particular has researched their performance and illustrated it with many examples of recorded logs from the 1930s as well as in more recent times. As in previous volumes, the author has added his own personal experiences with the engines and has sourced more than 250 photos, over 40 of which are in colour.

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Hereford Locomotive Shed

By Steve Bartlett

Hereford Locomotive ShedDescription:

Hereford Locomotive Shed is the first in a series of in-depth studies to look closely at the changing engine allocations and operational responsibilities of motive power depots during the latter days of steam. In Herefords case this was a varied mixture of main line passenger, freight trip working, branch line passenger, station pilot duties and yard shunting. Unusually, the latter remained a steam preserve until months before depot closure in November 1964. Not forgotten are the depots small sub-sheds, which had varying responsibilities over the years, as the district boundaries changed at Ledbury, Leominster, Ross-on-Wye and Craven Arms. Their very different duties were inevitably a reflection of a bygone age and an all too rapidly changing future.

The author personally recorded the Hereford railway scene from the late 1950s, until depot closure. He made shed visits several times a week, and at other times observed the ever-changing locomotive scene from the elevated Bulmers Sidewalk behind the depots coaling stage. Details carefully kept from those far-off days has proved a valuable cross reference with present-day research into Herefords role from official records at The National Archives, Kew, and other railway research sources.

Having spent almost forty years working in the industry, the author is able to sympathetically unravel and interpret the story of this hard-working mixed traffic depot. Hereford is strategically located on the North & West route from South Wales and the West of England to the North West, as well as being an important junction for Worcester & the West Midlands. Branch lines to Brecon and Gloucester radiated from this Border Counties railway junction, and freight trips radiated out to serve the surrounding area. All of this made Hereford a fascinating rail centre and a locomotive shed worthy of its story for posterity, which is meticulously recorded in this book.

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Heritage Traction on the Main Line

By Fred Kerr

Heritage Traction on the Main LineDescription:

In an earlier album titled BR Diesel Locomotives in Preservation Fred Kerr detailed the many classes of BR diesel locomotives that had been preserved and noted that some purchases had been made with the hope of operating them on the national network.

The Railways Bill 1993 provided an opportunity for this to happen and this album shows such locomotives at work during the early part of the 21st century upto December 2016. During this period many new train operators entered the market and their early operations used elderly locomotives withdrawn from service by their original operators until their business(es) were established and new locomotives could be bought. On occasion these new companies were prepared to hire preserved locomotives with main line access to service short-term contracts and these, mainly freight, services provided much of the variety of locomotive operations that offset the increasing sight of multiple unit train services that epitomise the modern railway.

The author has chosen to consider “heritage” traction as any locomotive older than twenty years, which therefore includes electric locomotives but excludes those of that age which are still operated by their owners as at April 1 1994 when British Railways (BR) was privatised. This results in the Class 59 fleet being excluded because its ownership has been constant but the Class 60 fleet being included because of purchases by Colas Railfreight after that date.

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Images of Fred Dibnah

By Keith Langston

Images of Fred DibnahDescription:

You didn't just meet with Fred Dibnah, you were instinctively drawn close to him. His larger than life personality was truly infectious and his communication skills second to none. Fred had the uncanny and somewhat unique knack of talking through a TV camera so that the viewer actually felt a personal contact with him. The Bolton-born steeplejack became nationally known and loved, following a series of TV programmes. Although an admirer of all things Victorian he was what the modern media people call 'a natural', microphones and TV cameras did not faze him one bit. This publication takes the reader on a fascinating journey during the making of Fred's last TV series in 2004.

Cheshire based KEITH LANGSTON is a widely published and highly respected photo journalist who specialises in heritage transportation and industrial archaeology subjects. Keith counts himself fortunate to have known Fred Dibnah personally and to have observed the 'great man' first hand as he went about his fascinating work. Keith Langston contributes news and feature material on a regular basis across a wide range of heritage titles.

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Images of Transport: Railway Disasters

By Simon Fowler

Images of Transport: Railway DisastersDescription:

British railways are one of the safest ways of travelling. That they are so is the result of painful lessons learnt over many decades, for there have been many hundreds of railway disasters.

This book looks at some of the most famous as well as some that have been all but forgotten, matching graphic illustrations with eyewitness accounts of people who were there and the confidential reports of the accident investigators who worked out what had gone wrong.

The book explores the reasons why accidents happen. Some are due to the carelessness of staff, others due to equipment failure or poor signalling. Yet others still baffle the experts. Simon Fowler is a long-standing Pen & Sword author having written many books on family and military history. He is a also a professional researcher and tutor.

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Irish Railways in the 1950s and 1960s

By Kevin McCormack

Irish Railways in the 1950s and 1960sDescription:

In the 1950s and 1960s the railway system in Ireland became a magnet for enthusiasts from Great Britain who realised that, as on the mainland, a way of life was fast disappearing as diesel traction replaced steam and the size of the rail network across Ireland was shrinking. Much of the interest stemmed from the similarity with the railways in Great Britain. Also, the existence of several narrow gauge systems, two railway-owned tramways and some cross-border operators added to the fascination.

This album covers those main line and narrow gauge railways in Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland during the 1950s and 1960s, which were photographed in colour and the images used are believed never to have appeared in print before. Although most of the pictures depict individual locomotives or ones hauling trains, the opportunity has been taken to show some of the railway infrastructure of the period as well, since this is of particular interest to railway modellers. There has been a very active preservation movement in Ireland over the years, with many wonderful steam-hauled rail tours being operated that continue to this day, however this book will focus on the normal every day operations.

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Isle of Man Transport: A Colour Journey in Time

By Martin Jenkins, Charles Roberts

Isle of Man Transport: A Colour Journey in TimeDescription:

This stunning selection of colour views, dating from the period 1953-1980, includes most of the vessels operated during this period by the Isle of Man Steam Packet Company and The Ramsey Steamship Company. Passenger boats and freighters are seen at ports on the island and on the mainland.

There is comprehensive coverage of the Peel, Ramsey and Port Erin lines operated by the Isle of Man Railway with some outstanding views taken during the 1950s, together with excellent portraits of most of the locomotives, as well carriages, vans, wagons, lorries, stations, staff and signal boxes. Also covered are Douglas Station and its environs, St John's junction and the Sunday 'specials' to Braddan. Many of the rich mix of bus types operated by the railway subsidiary, Isle of Man Road Services, are seen in a variety of locations. Included are some of the vehicles delivered just before and shortly after the Second World War.

There are good views of the fascinating Ramsey Pier Tramway and its unusual rolling stock, as well as rare scenes taken as early as 1953 on the Groudle Glen Railway. For anyone who loves the Isle of Man and its wealth of vintage transport, this book provides a remarkable trip down memory lane and a colourful reminder of some of its lost glories. The book is dedicated to the memory of John McCann who took brilliant colour views on the island starting in 1953.

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