Transport - Vintage Airfix


Transport Reference books

All these titles are available to purchase from Pen and Sword.

Contents:
- Directory of British Railways - New and Reopened Stations 1948-2018 - By Sally Salmon, Paul Smith..
- Early Victorian Railway Excursions - By Susan Major..
- England's Cathedrals by Train - By Murray Naylor..
- England's Historic Churches by Train - By Murray Naylor..
- Eric Bottomley's Transport Gallery - By Eric Bottomley..
- Female Railway Workers in World War II - By Susan Major..
- Festiniog Railway - By Peter Johnson..
- Festiniog Railway - The Spooner Era and After 1830 - 1920 - By Peter Johnson..
- Flying Scotsman - A Pictorial History - By Fred Kerr, Keith Langston..
- Flying Scotsman - The Legend Lives On - By Brian Sharpe..
- Fred Dibnah - By Keith Langston..
- From Clerk to Controller - By Roderick Fowkes..
- Gilbert Szlumper and Leo Amery of the Southern Railway - By John King..
- Gloucester Locomotive Sheds: Horton Road & Barnwood - By Steve Bartlett..
- Great Western Halls and Modified Halls - By Laurence Waters..

 


 

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Directory of British Railways - New and Reopened Stations 1948-2018

By Sally Salmon, Paul Smith

Directory of British Railways - New and Reopened Stations 1948-2018Description:

Folllowing nationalisation in 1948, British railways closed many branch lines and reduced the number of stations on the network. In January 1978, there were 2,358 and by January 2018 there were 2,560 stations on the network. The object of this book is to record those stations that are re-opened or are new stations to the system. The book gives: locations, facilities, chronology, statistics and passenger usage.

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Early Victorian Railway Excursions

By Susan Major

Early Victorian Railway ExcursionsDescription:

There is a widely held belief that Thomas Cook invented the railway excursion. In fact, the railway excursion is almost as old as the railway itself, dating back to the 1830s, when hordes of people from one town would descend on another for a ‘cheap trip’. Susan Major has carried out much in-depth research for this book, drawing on contemporary Victorian newspapers, and has discovered that, in fact, Cook played a very minor role, mainly in encouraging middle-class people to go on more expensive excursions. Her book fills an important gap in railway history. It explores for the first time how the vast majority of ordinary working people in Britain in the middle of the nineteenth century were able to travel cheaply for leisure over long distances, in huge crowds, and return home. This was a stunning experience for the excursionists and caused great shocks to observers at the time. These ‘trippers’ had to overcome many obstacles, particularly from the Church of England and the nonconformist movement, who were affronted by the idea of people enjoying themselves on a Sunday, their only day away from work.

The book charts the story of the early railway excursions from the 1840s to the 1860s, a dramatic period of railway and social change in British history. It looks at how these excursions were shaped and the experiences of working-class travellers during this period, demolishing a number of clichés and myths endlessly reproduced in traditional railway histories. While Michael Portillo paints a picture of travellers sitting tidily in their railway carriages, consulting their Bradshaws, many working-class excursionists on their trips were hanging on to the roof of a crowded carriage, endangering their lives, or enduring hours of travel in an open wagon in heavy rain.

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England's Cathedrals by Train

By Murray Naylor

England's Cathedrals by TrainDescription:

One of the jewels in the nation's crown is its Anglican cathedrals. Many, constructed after the invasion of 1066, stand as monuments to the determination and commitment of their Norman builders. Others have been built in later centuries while some started life as parish churches and were subsequently raised to cathedral status. Places of wonder and beauty, they symbolize the Christian life of the nation and are more visited today than ever as places which represent England's religious creed, heritage and the skills of their builders.

Eight hundred years later came the Victorians who pioneered the Industrial Revolution and created railways. Like their Norman predecessors they built to last and the railway system bequeathed to later generations, has endured in much the same form as when originally constructed. There is little sign that railways will be displaced by other modes of transport, anyway in the foreseeable future,

Combining a study of thirty-three English cathedrals and the railway systems which allow them to be reached, the author seeks to celebrate these two magnificent institutions. In the process he hopes to encourage others to travel the same journeys as he himself has undertaken.s seen in The Church Times and Worcester News.

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England's Historic Churches by Train

By Murray Naylor

England's Historic Churches by TrainDescription:

The second millennium saw the spread and consolidation of Christianity in Britain. One means by which the Normans tightened their grip on Britain after 1066 was by the construction of magnificent cathedrals, thereby demonstrating their intention to remain here. In his earlier book – England’s Cathedrals by Train – Murray Naylor explained how these hallowed buildings could be reached by train, relating their history and their principal features. His book invited readers to discover how the Normans and Victorians helped to shape our lives, either in constructing cathedrals or inventing railways.

England’s Great Historic Churches is the logical follow on to this book. Travelling across England it selects thirty-two of our ancient churches, relating their history and identifying those aspects which a visitor might overlook. His journeys include the great medieval abbeys at Tewkesbury, Selby and Hexham; the less well known priories at Cartmel and Great Malvern and other grand churches severely reduced after the Dissolution of Henry VIII’s reign, notably at Bridlington and Christchurch. He visits a church at Chesterfield where the spire leans at a crooked angle and goes to Boston, where the church - known as the Stump – was a starting point for many who emigrated to America in the 17th Century. Pride of place goes to Beverley Minster. In parallel he offers further observations on how railways have developed since the early 1800s and their future.

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By Eric Bottomley

Eric Bottomley's Transport GalleryDescription:

This is Eric Bottomley's second art book, in which he has varied both his transport themes and the mediums in which he works. The majority of paintings are in oils but also included are gouache (watercolour) and pencil sketches. However, some paintings are both gouache and pencil, together known as mixed media.

Railways have always been a great passion of Eric's, from trainspotting around the ex-Lancashire & Yorkshire system as a boy, to painting commisions for customers both private and commercial. From his lowly studio in Wimborne, Dorset, where his painting career took off, Eric never envisaged that one day he would witness his paintings being presented to the Duke of Kent, or that he would meet the Duke of Gloucester (a fellow railway enthusiast). In 1979 he joined the Guild of Railway Artists, and later became a full member.

Included in this book are all four regions of Britain's railway, but mostly the BR period from 1948, to the end of steam in 1968. Added to this are such scenes as the Trans-Siberian Express in Moscow, The Golfers Express leaving Belfast and preserved diesels in the USA.

The sad demise of steam and dereliction of the canals in the 1960s, and the amazing restoration projects over the years, has provided Eric with an enormous scope of subject matter, much of which is captured in this compelling book.

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Female Railway Workers in World War II

By Susan Major

Female Railway Workers in World War IIDescription:

During World War II women took on railway roles which were completely new to females. They worked as porters and guards, on the permanent way, and in maintenance and workshop operations. In this book Susan Major features the voices of women talking about their wartime railway experiences, using interviews by the Friends of the National Railway Museum. The interviews cover many areas of Britain.

Many were working in ‘men’s jobs’, or working with men for the first time, and these interviews offer tantalising glimpses of conditions, sometimes under great danger. What was it about railway work that attracted them? It’s fascinating to contrast their voices with the way they were portrayed in official publicity campaigns and in the light of attitudes to women working in the 1940s. These women talk about their difficulties in a workplace not designed for women – no toilets for example, the attitudes of their families, what they thought about American GIs and Italian POWs, how they coped with swearing and troublesome colleagues, rules about stockings. They describe devastating air raids and being thrust into tough responsibilities for the first time.

This book fills a gap, as most books on women’s wartime roles focus on the military services or industrial work. It offers valuable insights into the perceptions and concerns of these young women. As generations die out and families lose a direct connection, it becomes more important to be able to share their voices with a wider audience.

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Festiniog Railway

By Peter Johnson

Festiniog RailwayDescription:

Opened in 1836 as a horse tramway using gravity to carry slate from Blaenau Ffestiniog to Porthmadog, by the 1920s the Festiniog Railway had left its years of technical innovation and high profits long behind. After the First World War, the railway’s path led inexorably to closure, to passengers in 1939 and goods in 1946.

After years of abandonment, visionary enthusiasts found a way to take control of the railway and starting its restoration in 1955. Not only did they have to fight the undergrowth, they also had to fight a state-owned utility which had appropriated a part of the route. All problems were eventually overcome and a 2½ mile deviation saw services restored to Blaenau Ffestiniog in 1982.

Along the way, the railway found its old entrepreneurial magic, building new steam locomotives and carriages, and rebuilding the Welsh highland Railway, to become a leading 21st century tourist attraction.

Historian Peter Johnson, well known for his books on Welsh railways, has delved into the archives and previously untapped sources to produce this new history, a must-read for enthusiasts and visitors alike.

The Festiniog Railway’s pre-1921 history is covered in Peter Johnson’s book, Festiniog Railway the Spooner era and after 1830-1920, also published by Pen & Sword Transport.

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Festiniog Railway - The Spooner Era and After 1830 - 1920

By Peter Johnson

Festiniog Railway - The Spooner Era and After 1830 - 1920Description:

Festiniog Railway 1836-2014 describes the history of the worlds first steam-operated narrow gauge railway to carry passengers. It covers the history of the railway from its beginnings as a horse-worked tramroad in 1836, through its technical developments with the introduction of steam locomotives, Fairlie articulated locomotives and bogie carriages through its twentieth-century decline, to closure in 1946, and then to the preservation era and its development as a major twenty-first-century tourist attraction.

Built to serve the extensive slate industry in the Ffestiniog area of North Wales by carrying slate from the quarries to the port at Porthmadog, from 1865 the railway also operated a passenger service to serve the local community, which also attracted tourists. Closed in 1946 the railway was revived in stages from 1955, when a prolonged compensation claim was mounted against a major state-owned company for land taken to build a power station. Volunteers from all over the world came together to restore and operate this important piece of world industrial heritage, including the construction of the 2 mile deviation needed to bypass the power station. Services were resumed between Porthmadog and Blaenau Ffestiniog in 1982.

The Festiniog Railway runs through some of the most beautiful countryside in North Wales, with spectacular views of mountains and lakes. The railway also has a very impressive collection of modern and historic motive power and rolling stock. It is one of the most successful tourist attractions in Wales and is one of the most important industrial history sites in the world.

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Flying Scotsman - A Pictorial History

By Fred Kerr, Keith Langston

Flying Scotsman - A Pictorial HistoryDescription:

Built at Doncaster works in 1923 the Nigel Gresley designed then-‘A1’ class Pacific (4-6-2) first entered service as No 1472. The new locomotive did not receive a name until it was sent for display at a Wembley exhibition in 1924, and then the name Fying Scotsman was chosen. 

The Legend was born. In 1928 the London North Eastern Railway (LNER) express steam locomotive hauled the first non-stop service from London to Edinburgh and in 1934 went on to break through the 100mph barrier.

In addition to regularly hauling express trains for the LNER and later British Railways (BR), the Gresley steam icon has also travelled to, and worked passenger trains in, North America and Australia. Withdrawn by BR in January 1963 as BR No 60103, the locomotive was bought for preservation and soon became a regular sight on mainline specials and at preserved railways. 

The locomotive’s history in preservation is an interesting if not chequered one, however stability is now assured as Flying Scotsman has rightly become a part of the national collection administered by the National Railway Museum (NRM). The excitement which surrounded the return to steam of Flying Scotsman in 2016, and the ongoing celebrity status afforded to the famous Gresley designed engine, are perchance confirmation of the fact that it is ‘The World’s Most Famous Steam Locomotive’. The ‘most famous’ phrase entered into locomotive preservation folklore when first broadcast by John Noakes, a BBC TV Blue Peter presenter. 

A great many words have been written about the engineering specification and ‘in service’ performance of Flying Scotsman. Accordingly, this keepsake publication simply uses carefully selected images, dating from the BR steam era to the present day, to celebrate the ‘Return of the Legend’. 

This publication includes a selection of QR Codes with links to items of film footage.

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Flying Scotsman - The Legend Lives On

By Brian Sharpe

Flying Scotsman - The Legend Lives OnDescription:

From hauling the first non-stop express from London to Edinburgh in 1928 and breaking the 100mph barrier in 1934, to being sold in 1963, and to its final home at the York National Railway Centre, The Flying Scotsman has a rich and, at times, controversial history.

It has travelled across the USA and steamed across Australia, changed owners and colour and sold for the highest price ever paid for a locomotive. Relive the great age of steam and follow the making of the legend that is apple green and called Flying Scotsman. An informative and highly illustrated account of British Steam engines and railways, which includes concise, appealing articles on locomotive development and industrial progress.

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Fred Dibnah

By Keith Langston

Fred DibnahDescription:

Mid-Cheshire based heritage transportation specialist photographer and feature writer Keith Langston travelled extensively with Fred Dibnah during the filming of his last TV series, 'Made in Britain.' Following Fred's untimely death, Keith embarked upon the creation of a book, drawing not only on his experiences with the Bolton born steeplejack and TV presenter, but in addition talking to a representative cross section of those persons who numbered themselves amongst Fred's many friends. Fred became a high profile media personality and the fame which accompanied that status never affected him, or in any way changed his down to earth demeanour. He will be remembered not only for his many practical achievements, but also for encouraging thousands of others to care about our industrial heritage. The steam bug infected Fred at a very early age possibly following his illicit visits to his father's place of work, a bleach factory. Encouraged by one of his ex teachers Fred started what he described as 'a steeplejack business'. When he turned to presenting his own programmes his blunt, no nonsense style made a welcome change from the so called television professionals. His genius lay in being able to communicate with the audience in simple, direct, colloquial English.

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From Clerk to Controller

By Roderick Fowkes

From Clerk to ControllerDescription:

‘Like so many other boys of my generation, I wanted to be an engine driver; my dreams, however, were dashed in 1956 when I went for a medical at Derby. So much depended upon having perfect eyesight ...’ So wrote the author in his introduction in Last Days of Steam on the LMS & BR, published in 2009. Now featuring all new colour photographs, From Clerk to Controller is an account of Roderick H. Fowkes’ service on the railway, from 1966 until his retirement in 1996.

Reflecting on the demise of steam in the 1960s, and revisiting the author’s experiences in Trent in 1957, the compelling story continues with ‘some of the best times of a thirty-nine year career with BR’, including Fowkes’ years working in Control and the fulfilment of his lifetime ambition of moving to the West Country.

Filled with personal and memorable anecdotes, this book continues the extraordinary tale of the thirty-nine year British Railways career of a man deemed unsuitable for the footplate grade in 1957.

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Gilbert Szlumper and Leo Amery of the Southern Railway

By John King

Gilbert Szlumper and Leo Amery of the Southern RailwayDescription:

Very few diaries of directors and senior managers of the Big Four railways have survived to enter the public domain. There are, however, two notable Southern Railway diarists whose records have been available in archives for some years, but have been largely ignored by historians; Southern Railway General Manager Gilbert Szlumper and Director Leopold Amery. Their remarkable diaries are addressed in this insightful book, which gives a slightly different view of the company in contrast to the almost sanitised histories by some writers.

The surviving diaries of Szlumper are far from complete. They begin in 1936 and continue into the war years, but there are several gaps. Throughout, Szlumper comments on individuals and developments, revealing little-known facts and the circumstances that meant he could never truly achieve his potential. Formally retiring in 1942, he died in 1969, after which his diaries entered the public domain.

Leopold Amery was director of the Southern Railway from 1932. A Birmingham Member of Parliament for many years, he was a statesman of some stature, his high offices including Secretary of State for the Colonies in the 1920s. In his autobiography, Amery writes very little on the railway, although he does comment on its family atmosphere. His diaries, which are in the public domain in a Cambridge University archive, have been published in two volumes but Amerys fascinating business activities were omitted by the publisher, and like Szlumper he comments on individuals and developments.

The diary information of these two exceptional men has been supplemented by information from the railway, state archives and other sources, and many of the photographs have never been published before.

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Gloucester Locomotive Sheds: Horton Road & Barnwood

By Steve Bartlett

Gloucester Locomotive Sheds: Horton Road & BarnwoodDescription:

GLOUCESTER LOCOMOTIVE SHEDS is the latest in a series of in-depth studies of motive power depots during the latter days of steam, looking closely at their changing engine allocations and operational responsibilities. At the time, Gloucester was a busy and fascinating rail centre where ex-GWR and ex-LMS (Midland Railway) routes met, each with main line passenger and freight services, local passenger trains and extensive freight trips providing an endless panorama of railway activity.

The principal ex-GWR Gloucester Horton Road and ex-LMS (Midland Railway) Gloucester Barnwood motive power depots are covered in depth with their locomotive allocations, operational duties and changing responsibilities over the years fully described. Not forgotten are both depots’ sub-sheds at Brimscombe, Cheltenham Malvern Road, Lydney, Ross-on-Wye, Dursley and Tewkesbury along with the duties and local routes that they covered.

This in-depth study is supported by over 200 well-chosen black and white photographs, many of which are previously unpublished, and each of the motive power depots covered are supported by detailed plans of the shed layouts.

This new book follows the same author’s successful “Hereford Locomotive Shed” published in October 2017 and further books are planned in the series.

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Great Western Halls and Modified Halls

By Laurence Waters

Great Western Halls and Modified HallsDescription:

The gradual growth of the railways in Britain during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, in both passenger and freight traffic, saw the requirement for a more powerful and versatile type of motive power – mixed traffic locomotives. The construction of Great Western Halls and Modified Halls gave the Great Western a superb all round locomotive, and for thirty-six years they operated passenger and freight services over the Great Western, and later Western, Region. 

The Hall class were among the largest mixed traffic steam locomotives running throughout the country, and this book is the first serious volume to focus on them in fifty years. The book charts the history of both classes, from their construction and withdrawal, to their design, development and eventual scrapping. With over 200 black and white and colour photographs, accompanied by informative captions, many members of the class are excellently illustrated. It will appeal greatly to those interested in the history of Great Western Locomotive development.

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