Transport - Vintage Airfix


Transport Reference books

All these titles are available to purchase from Pen and Sword.

Contents:
- An Introduction to Great Western Locomotive Development - By Jim Champ..
- Armoured Trains - By Lt Col. PAUL MALMASSARI..
- Around Britain by Canal - By Anthony Burton..
- Barry, Railway and Port - By John Hodge..
- BET Group Bus Fleets - By Jim Blake..
- Biography of British Train Travel - By Don Benn..
- BR Diesel Locomotives in Preservation - By Fred Kerr..
- Britain's Declining Secondary Railways through the 1960s - By Martin Jenkins, Kevin McCormack..
- Britain's Last Mechanical Signalling - By Gareth David..
- British Buses 1967 - By Jim Blake..
- British Municipal Bus Operators - By Jim Blake..
- British Railways A C Electric Locomotives - By David Cable..
- British Railways in the 1960s: London Midland Region - By Geoff M Plumb..
- British Railways in the 1960s: Southern Region - By Geoff M Plumb..
- British Railways in Transition - By Jim Blake..

 


 

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An Introduction to Great Western Locomotive Development

By Jim Champ

An Introduction to Great Western Locomotive DevelopmentDescription:

The first thought, when contemplating a new study of the Great Western Railway locomotive fleet, must surely be to ask what can there be left to say? But there is no single source which gives a general introduction to the Great Western locomotive fleet. There are monographs on individual classes, an excellent multi-volume detail study from the RCTS, and superb collections of photographs, but nothing that brings it all together. This work is intended to provide that general introduction.

The volume begins with a series of short essays covering general trends in design development, whilst the main body of the volume covers individual classes. For each class there is a small table containing some principal dimensions and paragraphs of text, covering an introduction, renumbering, key changes in the development of the class and information on withdrawal.

The volume concludes with appendices covering the development and types of standard boilers, the various numbering schemes used by the GWR, the arcane subject of locomotive diagrams and lot numbers, and a short reference on the many lines the GWR engulfed.

The majority of illustrations are new profile drawings to a consistent format. Described as sketches, they are drawn to consistent scales, but do not claim to be scale drawings. Much minor equipment has been omitted and the author has certainly not dared to include rivets! Although most are based around GWR weight diagrams, they are not simple traces of the original drawings. Detail has been added from other sources, components copied from different drawings and details have been checked against historical and modern photographs. One must also bear in mind that steam locomotives were not mass produced. Minor fittings frequently varied in position and changes were made over the locomotives' lifetimes. Nevertheless, this collection of drawings provides a uniquely consistent view of the GWR locomotive fleet.

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Armoured Trains

By Lt Col. PAUL MALMASSARI

Armoured TrainsDescription:

The military was quick to see the advantages of railways in warfare, whether for the rapid deployment of men or the movement of heavy equipment like artillery. From here it was a short step to making the train a potent weapon in its own right – a mobile fort or a battleship on rails. Armed and armoured, they became the first practical self-propelled war machines, which by the time of the American Civil War were able to make a significant contribution to battlefield success.

Thereafter, almost every belligerent nation with a railway system made some use of armoured rolling stock, ranging from low-intensity colonial policing to the massive employment of armoured trains during the Russian Civil War. And although they were somewhat eclipsed as frontline weapons by the development of the tank and other AFVs, armoured trains retained a role as late as the civil wars in the former republic of Yugoslavia.

This truly encyclopaedic book covers, country by country, the huge range of fighting equipment that rode the rails over nearly two centuries. While it outlines the place of armoured trains in the evolution of warfare, it concentrates on details of their design through a vast array of photographs and the author’s meticulous drawings. Published in French in 1989, this highly regarded work has been completely revised and expanded for this English edition. It remains the last word on the subject.

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Around Britain by Canal

By Anthony Burton

Around Britain by CanalDescription:

This is the story of a thousand mile-long trip around England by canal. At times the journey took the author out into the beautiful countryside, and elsewhere the canal crept round the edge of old industrial towns.

It is a journey that proved full of surprises, delights and rich variety, as the book clearly demonstrates. The book illustrates the great contrasts between travelling on the wide tidal waters of the River Trent and being overtaken by sea-going cargo ships, to meadnering along the sinuous curves of the Oxford Canal. The Leeds & Liverpool Canal brought magnificent moorland scenery and the drama of the great five-lock staircase at Bingley. London was seen from two very different perspectives. Travelling past the elegant houses of Little Venice and Regents Park and then turning back along the Thames to float past the Houses of Parliament. The author finds as much pleasure in the hidden corners of Birmingham as in the rural beauties of Shropshire.

The book has become regarded as a classic of canal travel, and is reissued with previously unpublished colour photographs taken by Phillip Lloyd, who shared the trip with the author.

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Barry, Railway and Port

By John Hodge

Barry, Railway and PortDescription:

Many railway historians and enthusiasts only know about the railways in the Barry area, because of Woodham Brothers scrap yard, where so many locomotives were rescued for preservation.

However, there is a wider story to be told of the development and history of the railway and docks and John Hodge, the author of this detailed and informative volume, provides accounts of the various aspects of railway and dock activity over the years with details and photographs of the several industries involved.”

“The Barry story is far more than the location of a once-famous scrapyard which, by the end of the 1960s, held over two hundred condemned locomotives.

This book covers the history of the railway and docks at this fascinating town, from the construction and opening of the Barry Railway and Dock in 1888/9, through to the demise of its principal traffic, coal, in the early 1970s, and on to the present day.

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BET Group Bus Fleets

By Jim Blake

BET Group Bus FleetsDescription:

This book looks at the wonderful variety of buses and coaches operated by British Electric Traction group fleets in the 1960s, featuring previously unpublished photographs from Jim Blake's extensive archives.

Not only did these fleets, which served most of England and Wales, have a splendid variety of British-built buses and coaches with chassis manufactured by the likes of AEC, Crossley, Daimler, Dennis, Guy and Leyland – with bodywork by such firms as Park Royal, Weymann, Metro-Cammell, East Lancs, Northern Counties, Roe, Duple, Plaxton, Willowbrook and Leyland again – but they also had an array of distinctive liveries. Many dated back to the early part of the century when the operators first started bus operation. The smart maroon and cream of East Kent, the dark green and cream of Maidstone & District or the light green and cream of Southdown, for example, were supplemented by ornate fleet-names, often in gold lettering. These three fleets were just a few of those that served seaside towns, and will remind readers of holidays they spent in the 1950s and '60s.

Sadly, the years covered by this book are the final years of the BET group, which was taken over by the nationalised Transport Holding Company in late 1967, as a prelude to the creation of the National Bus Company, under which the distinctive liveries of the BET group fleets, and even some of the operators themselves, would disappear.

The 1960s also saw the demise of many traditional types of bus that these fleets operated, owing to the introduction of rear-engined double-deckers, such as the Leyland Atlantean and Daimler Fleetline, as well as the spread of one-man operation. Many of the photographs featured in this book show the older types in their final days – pure nostalgia for the transport enthusiast!

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Biography of British Train Travel

By Don Benn

Biography of British Train TravelDescription:

Biography of British Train Travel is a collection of mainly previously unpublished articles and short stories, covering a lifelong interest in railways. It spans a wide spectrum over the years, from the early days in Kent in 1960, through the many hours on the lineside on the Surrey Hills line and the South Western main line, to the last frantic years of steam on the Southern, and the current steam scene, as well as the privileged and exciting times spent riding on the footplate of steam locomotives. 

It majors on the author’s main railway passions of steam locomotives, train running performance, including modern motive power and all matters Southern. Locomotive performance in Europe and a tramway are also included, as is a fascinating minor- and little-visited narrow gauge railway in southern England, plus heritage traction on the London Underground.

The book comprises approximately 350 illustrations, many in colour, as well as contemporary timetable extracts and copies of notebook pages, which cover shed visits in Scotland. Fifty train running logs are included, together with some detailed records of days spent by the linesides of railways when steam was still the predominant motive power in parts of the south.

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BR Diesel Locomotives in Preservation

By Fred Kerr

BR Diesel Locomotives in PreservationDescription:

When British Railways (BR) initiated its Modernisation Plan in 1954 it had little experience of diesel locomotives thus initiated a Pilot Scheme to trial combinations of the three elements comprised within a locomotive – the engine, transmission and body.

The initial orders for 174 locomotives were placed in November 1955, but even before the first locomotive had been delivered, changes in Government policy led to bulk orders for most designs being trialled. It was only in 1968, once steam traction had been removed from the network, that BR was able to review the success, or otherwise, of its diesel fleet and decide which designs to withdraw from service.

The nascent preservation movement of the time was concerned to preserve steam locomotives whilst only buying diesel shunting locomotives for support roles on heritage lines and it wasn’t until 1977 that any effort was made to preserve main line diesels. Once it was confirmed that diesel locomotives had an appeal to enthusiasts, further purchases were made that resulted in examples of most of the BR diesel classes being represented within the preservation movement.

Fred Kerr’s book details those classes which are represented on heritage lines, identifies where possible their location as of December 2016, shows many of them at work and shows what is involved in the restoration, maintenance and operation of diesel locomotives by the volunteers whose efforts are vital but rarely acknowledged.

Some of the preserved locomotives were bought for possible use on the national network and this was facilitated by the Railways Bill 1993. A complementary album of preserved and heritage locomotives titled Heritage Traction on the Main Line details the locomotive classes whose representatives are still in regular use on the national network as at December 2016 and follows a similar format to this album.

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Britain's Declining Secondary Railways through the 1960s

By Martin Jenkins, Kevin McCormack

Britain's Declining Secondary Railways through the 1960sDescription:

This is an evocative selection of high quality colour views, each of which recaptures the lost age of Britain's branch lines and secondary railways, of which so many were axed following implementation of the 'Beeching Report' during the 1960s.

Most importantly, the previously unpublished views in this book are the work of one man, Blake Paterson, a professional railwayman, who was also an outstanding photographer who some forty-five years ago was determined to record as much of the passing railway scene as possible. He set himself demanding schedules and would often travel vast distances, sometimes using overnight trains, to reach the more remote comers of the rail network.

During this intense period of photographic activity, when he took thousands of colour slides, he followed his own strict rules. He would normally only take a photograph when the sun was shining and he would try to capture the train in its natural setting. For Blake, ambiance was paramount.

This book is a unique record of one man's railway portraits, featuring a wealth of locations, steam and diesel locomotives, DMUs, stations and station buildings, halts, signals, gas lamps, infrastructure, staff and passengers. Anything that was set to vanish, Blake felt should be recorded. His photographs provide a perfect pictorial record of so many of the lost splendours of Britains rail network.

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Britain's Last Mechanical Signalling

By Gareth David

Britain's Last Mechanical SignallingDescription:

Mechanical signalling has been on the way out since colour signalling was introduced in the 1920s. It was originally intended to replace mechanical signalling by the millennium, however, there are still odd pockets in the system today. There is a network rail project to finally eliminate the last boxes and mechanical signals in the next few years, replacing it with a dozen railway operating centres. this book looks at the last mechanical signalling on the network.

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British Buses 1967

By Jim Blake

British Buses 1967Description:

This book looks at an important turning point in the history of the bus industry in Britain. 1967 was the penultimate year to the end of an era, when private and semi-nationalized company's operated the bus networks in this country.

After 1967 the network was never the same again, with the formation of the National Bus Company in 1968.

The NBC was a very bland organization compared to the colourful bus companies that had existed before nationalization, and many small municipal fleets amalgamated to form Passenger Transport Executives.

This comprehensive volume covers a large number of the bus companies throughout the country in 1967 and also has a good readable narrative describing Jim Blake's journeys travelling on these services across Britain.

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British Municipal Bus Operators

By Jim Blake

British Municipal Bus OperatorsDescription:

This book looks at municipal operators in England and Wales in the 1960s. Going back to the very first horse-bus or tram operations in Victorian times, many towns and cities throughout Britain had such operators, owned and run by the town or city councils. Most of them had tramway systems, many of which were replaced by trolleybuses from the 1920s onwards. In turn, after the Second World War, trolleybuses too were on the way out, with motorbuses unfortunately replacing both forms of electric traction. By the 1960s, only a handful were still operating trams, then by the end of the decade only few trolleybus systems remained.

During this period, some of these operators had very large fleets, for example those serving the conurbations of Birmingham, Liverpool and Manchester, whilst others had very small fleets, such as West Bridgford Urban District Council in Nottinghamshire.

Municipal operators had a wide variety of vehicle types, encompassing virtually all chassis and body makes then in service, and were also well known for their distinctive, traditional liveries. In addition to the buses, there were also still trams and trolleybuses, which to many enthusiasts made them that much more interesting.

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British Railways A C Electric Locomotives

By David Cable

British Railways A C Electric LocomotivesDescription:

The genesis of 25kv overhead electrification began in the late 1960s on the West Coast Main Line, the 1980s for the East Anglian Main Line, and the East Coast Main Line in the late 1980s. Development took place in stages culminating in fully electrified lines from London to Scotland on both East and West Coast lines, and from London to Norwich. The introduction of these lines required the construction of new motive power.

Initially five types were produced for the WCML, from which the second phase of loco design was developed, giving a higher level of reliability, as well as power output. These newer designs were applied to the Anglian services, but the ECML plans required an updated design, ostensibly for mixed traffic, but hardly ever used on anything other than express passenger services, for which their 140mph potential enabled a major recast of the timetable. The opening of the Channel Tunnel required a mixed traffic dual voltage locomotive, running on both 25kv and the Southern Region 750v third rail DC.

The locomotives are classified between 81 and 92 inclusive, and this book of photographs by David Cable covers all the classes in a variety of locations and duties.

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British Railways in the 1960s: London Midland Region

By Geoff M Plumb

British Railways in the 1960s: London Midland RegionDescription:

After the Second World War, Britain's railways were rundown and worn out, requiring massive investment and modernisation. The Big Four railway companies were nationalised from 1948, and the newly formed British Railways embarked on a programme of building new standard steam locomotives to replace older types. These started to come on stream from 1951.

This programme was superseded by the 1955 scheme to dieselise and electrify many lines and so the last loco of the Standard types was built in 1960 and the steam locomotives had been swept entirely from the BR network by 1968.

This series of books, 'The Geoff Plumb Collection', is a photographic account of those last few years of the steam locomotives, their decline and replacement during the transition years. Each book covers one of the former 'Big Four', in the form of the BR Regions they became: the Southern Railway, London Midland & Scottish Railway, Great Western Railway and London & North Eastern Railway, including some pictures of the Scottish lines of the LMS and LNER.

The books are not intended to convey a complete history of the railways but to illustrate how things were, to a certain extent, in the relatively recent past and impart some information through comprehensive captions, which give a sense of occasion often a last run of a locomotive type or over a stretch of line about to be closed down.

The photos cover large parts of the country, though it was impossible to get everywhere given the overall timetable of just a few years mainly when the author was still a schoolboy with limited time and disposable income to get around.

Pictures are of the highest quality that could be produced with the equipment then available, but they do reflect real life and real times. In simple terms, a look at a period not so long ago but now gone forever.

Vintage Airfix Review:

No review currently available.

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British Railways in the 1960s: Southern Region

By Geoff M Plumb

British Railways in the 1960s: Southern RegionDescription:

After the Second War, Britains railways were rundown and worn out, requiring massive investment and modernisation. The Big Four railway companies were nationalised from 1948, and the newly formed British Railways embarked on a programme of building new Standard steam locomotives to replace older types. These started to come on stream from 1951.

This programme was superseded by the 1955 scheme to dieselise and electrify many lines and so the last loco of the Standard types was built in 1960 and the steam locomotives had been swept entirely from the BR network by 1968.

This series of books, 'The Geoff Plumb Collection', is a photographic account of those last few years of the steam locomotives, their decline and replacement during the transition years. Each book covers one of the former Big Four, the Southern Railway, London Midland & Scottish Railway, Great Western Railway and London & North Eastern Railway, including some pictures of the Scottish lines of the LMS and LNER.

The books are not intended to convey a complete history of the railways but to illustrate how things were, to a certain extent, in the relatively recent past and impart some information through comprehensive captions, which give a sense of occasion often a last run of a locomotive type or over a stretch of line about to be closed down.

The photos cover large parts of the country, though it was impossible to get everywhere given the overall timetable of just a few years mainly when the author was still a schoolboy with limited time and disposable income to get around.

Pictures are of the highest quality that could be produced with the equipment then available, but they do reflect real life and real times. In simple terms, a look at a period not so long ago but now gone forever.

Vintage Airfix Review:

No review currently available.

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British Railways in Transition

By Jim Blake

British Railways in TransitionDescription:

This is a book about the years following the transition from steam to diesel and electric traction on British Railways, covering a period from 1964-1997. The author Jim Blake, took a huge number of pictures during these years, covering many aspects of British railway and bus operation, both in the London area, where he lives, and also around the country. This book looks at the railway scene in decline, trying to come to terms with the post Beeching, post steam era, before a change of political will, that has seen much rail investment in recent times. The volume not only looks at locomotives and trains, but also the overall railway scene of these years of great change since the 1960s.

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