Transport Reference books


Transport Reference books

All these titles are available to purchase from Pen and Sword.

Contents:
- Early Railways - By Peter Chatham, Stephen Weston. Reviewed by Vintage Airfix.
- 200 Years of The Lancaster Canal - By Gordon Biddle..
- A Marine Artist's Portfolio - By Susanne Fournais Grube..
- A Pageant of British Steam - By Geoff Swaine..
- A Privileged Journey - By David Maidment..
- A Railway History of New Shildon - By George Turner Smith..
- A Steam Engine Pilgrimage - By Anthony Burton..
- Adrian Shooter - By Adrian Shooter..
- Allied Railways of the Western Front - Narrow Gauge in the Arras Sector - By Martin J. B. Farebrother, Joan S. Farebrother..
- Allied Railways of the Western Front - Narrow Gauge in the Somme Sector - By Martin J. B. Farebrother, Joan S. Farebrother..
- An Encyclopaedia of British Bridges - By David McFetrich..
- An Indian Summer of Steam - By David Maidment..
- An Introduction to Great Western Locomotive Development - By Jim Champ..
- Armoured Trains - By Lt Col. PAUL MALMASSARI..
- Around Britain by Canal - By Anthony Burton..

 


 

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Early Railways

By Peter Chatham, Stephen Weston

Early RailwaysDescription:

Early Railways, A Guide for the Modeller will encourage and support the modelling of the earliest period of railway history, from the very beginnings of steam traction at the start of the nineteenth century, up to about 1880; a period which for British modellers has scarcely been covered in book form. Over these few decades the railways evolved from something which at the start was markedly different, into a scene that any present-day railwayman would recognise.

It is a time with much to commend it from a modellers point of view. The trains were much shorter and therefore easier to fit into the limited space most of us have available as, correspondingly, were the station layouts, especially at the beginning of the period. Modelled at 7mm to the foot scale a modern steam express would need at least 12 or 13 feet in length and a minimum curve radius of 6 feet, whereas an 1840 express of a loco and a dozen carriages might be no more than about 6 feet long and, behind the scenes at least, able to take curves of no more than 2 or 3 feet radius, as well as being able to instantly catch the eye of the viewer.

Vintage Airfix Review:

The historical detail in this book is fascinating and the detailed diagrams of the early engines and rolling stock will be very useful to a modeller of this era. The book is aimed at the '0' gauge modeller. I would suggest that this book is more aimed at the experienced modeller and, if you're a master scratch builder, it would be a must have reference.

On the whole a really great historical reference book of long forgotten trains with stunning examples of dioramas from top modellers.

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200 Years of The Lancaster Canal

By Gordon Biddle

200 Years of The Lancaster CanalDescription:

2019 marks the 200th anniversary of the completion of the Lancaster Canal from Wigan to Kendal. Designed by the celebrated engineer John Ronnie, it is notable for a large number of aqueducts, including the magnificent Lune Aqueduct at Lancaster. A large aqueduct across the Ribble Valley at Preston was never built, leaving the canal in two sections connected by a temporary horse tramroad which became permanent. Consequently the 57 miles from Preston to Kendal remained isolated until 2006, when it was connected to the main network via the Ribble estuary. Before the railways were built the canal was unique in running a highly efficient passenger service and for several years actually took over a main line railway company. In 1947 the final 15 miles to Kendal were closed and partly drained. The author was an early member of the Lancaster Canal Trust in 1963, which is now at the forefront of a campaign to re-open the closed section. This book examines the history of the waterway, its powerful effect on the 18-19th century economy of north Lancashire and south Cumbria, the canal as it is today and the offers being made to restore it to navigation throughout.

Vintage Airfix Review:

No review currently available.

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A Marine Artist's Portfolio

By Susanne Fournais Grube

A Marine Artist's PortfolioDescription:

Susanne Fournais Grube, has been painting marine scenes for over thirty years, during which time, she has produced a large portfolio of material, not only depicting ships and small craft, but also the architecture of marine buildings and light houses. This volume, for the first time , presents a good selection of her work, looking at most aspects of the artists subject matter. The book covers subjects painted for clients, both corporate and private, also including some material painted just for pleasure. Overall the work, is a good selection of material produced over many years, that is for the first time in the public domain.

Vintage Airfix Review:

No review currently available.

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A Pageant of British Steam

By Geoff Swaine

A Pageant of British SteamDescription:

A Pageant of British Steam is a book honouring the position to which Britain’s Heritage Steam Railways has now arrived.

Preservation has become the word for the achievements of the thousands of volunteers who have given up a mass of time to advance the saving of this section of Britain’s history. Most of these people are the likely descendants of our Industrial Revolution where the skills have never been forgotten.

The book shows in fine colour photography the wonderful selection of locomotives and rolling stock running on our preserved lines – all across the country. Text highlights the historical background of railway history from the earliest times right through to the ‘end of steam’ in the nineteen sixties.

Geoff Swaine has emerged to be a leader in this field of photography, be it lineside or heritage working steam. His style is one of his own, where the subject leaps from the page, usually bathed in fine sunlight with blue sky above.

Informative captions accompany every picture not only targeting the novice or newcomer to the subject, but the experienced rail enthusiast will also be pleased to learn a thing or two.

This book strongly features the historical background as well as catching some of the people who now revel in dressing the part to prove their love of this enthralling and popular subject.

Vintage Airfix Review:

No review currently available.

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A Privileged Journey

By David Maidment

A Privileged JourneyDescription:

A Privileged Journey: From Enthusiast to Professional Railwayman is a personal account of the author's youthful enthusiasm for trains, travelling throughout Great Britain and Europe as a student and management trainee of British Railways. The book is illustrated with over 140 black and white photos, mostly taken by the author during his travels.

The chapters cover the emergence of the young boy's interest in steam locomotives, through his early 'trainspotting' days to his numerous journeys in the late 1950s and early 1960s, with many accounts of locomotive performance supported by an extensive appendix of train logs. Some of the chapters are much extended narratives from articles serialised in the UK enthusiast magazine 'Steam World', and are also based on ten hours of verbal interviews recorded by the UK National Railway Museum at York as part of their Oral History archives supported by a UK National Lottery Grant.

The second volume (covering the period from 1962 to the current time) will describe his continuing interest and records whilst pursuing his career as Stationmaster, Area Manager, Train Planner, Regional Operating Manager and finally Head of Safety, followed by his retirement in 1996 and subsequent career as an international railway safety consultant.

Vintage Airfix Review:

No review currently available.

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A Railway History of New Shildon

By George Turner Smith

A Railway History of New ShildonDescription:

On the 27th September 1825, the first public railway steam train left New Shildon for Stockton-on-Tees. The driver was George Stephenson and the engine he was driving was the ‘Locomotion No.1’. It set off from a settlement which would become New Shildon. At the time it consisted of just a set of rails and four houses, none of which had been there less than a year before. The four houses became a town with a five-figure population; a town that owed its existence to the railway that made its home there - the ‘Stockton and Darlington’(S&DR). Some of the earliest and greatest railway pioneers worked there, including George and his son Robert, the Hackworth brothers, Timothy and Thomas, and the engineer William Bouch. Their story is part of New Shildon’s story. The locomotive works, created to build and maintain steam locomotives, morphed into the world’s most innovative works whose demise had more to do with politics than productivity. This book covers Shildon's years between 1820 and today, including the war interludes when the wagon works was manned by women and the output was mostly intended for the MOD. The story of the creation of the town's railway museum and the arrival of Hitachi at Newton Aycliffe brings the history up to date and , to complete the picture, there is also a description of the on-going new build G5 steam locomotive project on Hackworth Industrial Estate, the very site where the S&DR locomotive and wagon works was located. Although the story of a railway town, it is also the story of people who lived there and made it what it is today.

Vintage Airfix Review:

No review currently available.

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A Steam Engine Pilgrimage

By Anthony Burton

A Steam Engine PilgrimageDescription:

Anthony Burton has travelled from the Highlands of Scotland, to the south west of England in pursuit of his passion for the steam engine in all its different forms. He has travelled on narrow gauge railways in Wales and enjoyed the splendour of main line journeys behind some of the grandest locomotives ever built. He has shovelled coal into the boiler of an old Clyde Puffer, while steaming down Scotland’s west coast, and luxuriated in the elegance of a Windermere steam launch. He has marvelled at the magnificence of the great Victorian pumping engines and their elaborately decorated engine houses – and spends time every year helping to oil and polish an old mill engine to get it ready to receive visitors. He has revelled in the fun of the steam fair and shared a ride in a replica of Richard Trevithick’s extraordinary steam carriage with a direct descendant of the great engineer.

All these experiences and more are brought together in this lively narrative, in which the author shares his own sense of excitement and places each visit within its historical context. Above all, this book is a tribute to all those anonymous volunteers whose hard work and dedication have kept this great tradition alive.

Vintage Airfix Review:

No review currently available.

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Adrian Shooter

By Adrian Shooter

Adrian ShooterDescription:

This book is the tale of a small boy from Surrey who had a fascination with anything on wheels and, also, loved to learn about people and what motivated them. He read a lot about railways and was excited by the innovations of our nineteenth-century predecessors. When the Beeching report came out in 1963, he decided that he wanted to be a part of the new order and help bring back some of that excitement. He describes his upbringing and paints a picture of the 'greyness' of the 1950s and then takes the reader on a voyage of discovery into the world of 1960's engineering before he joined British Railway in 1970.

The view from the inside presents readers with a whole new picture of what was really going on within British Rail at various levels. Much that is reported has never before been published, and the reasons for many decisions on previously opaque matters are explained.

The author was cautioned by his school careers master to be wary of saying what he really thought. It seems that this piece of advice has not been heeded.

Vintage Airfix Review:

No review currently available.

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Allied Railways of the Western Front - Narrow Gauge in the Arras Sector

By Martin J. B. Farebrother, Joan S. Farebrother

Allied Railways of the Western Front - Narrow Gauge in the Arras SectorDescription:

The Arras sector of the Western Front in World War I (WW1) was held partly by the British and Dominions 1st Army from September 1915, and almost wholly by the 1st and 3rd Armies from March 1916. No less than in the Ypres sector to the north and the Somme sector to the south, the struggles of the French and then British troops in this sector were pivotal to the outcome of the War. The sector included countryside in the south, but in the north a major part of the industrial and coal-mining area of northern France, around Lens and Béthune. 

In this book the contribution of metre and 60 cm gauge railways to the Allied war effort in this sector is examined in the context of the history of the metre gauge lines already established. The build up of light (60 cm gauge) lines from 1916 is examined in detail area by area, and the contribution of the related metre gauge lines is reassessed, from British and French sources. After the War the role of these railways in the reconstruction and recovery of this devastated region of France is described. Later the surviving part of the 60 cm gauge network served the sugar beet industry east of Arras. The history is followed through another World War to the closure of the last of these railways in 1957.

The book refers to previous works on British War Department light railways in WW1, but contains sufficient general information for readers new to the subject. It also describes how to find key locations now, and how and where rolling stock can be seen. Six walks and an urban tour are included for those who wish to explore the territory in greater depth.

Vintage Airfix Review:

No review currently available.

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Allied Railways of the Western Front - Narrow Gauge in the Somme Sector

By Martin J. B. Farebrother, Joan S. Farebrother

Allied Railways of the Western Front - Narrow Gauge in the Somme SectorDescription:

The Somme sector of the Western Front was held by French forces until early 1916, when the British and Dominions Third and Fourth Armies moved into the northern part, before the joint First Battle of the Somme from July to November 1916. In 1917, with the German withdrawal to the Hindenburg Line, British responsibility moved further south. By early 1918 the British Third and Fifth Armies were responsible as far south as east of Noyon. In Spring 1918 the German attack and advance from the Hindenburg Line came west almost to Amiens. However the British and French Armies finally stopped the advance, and from August 1918 drove the German Army back eastwards until the Armistice on 11 November 1918.

In this book the metre gauge networks established before the First World War are examined. Then the build up of light (60cm gauge) railways, initially mainly French but later British, in 1915 and 1916, is considered, with an assessment of the contribution of these and the metre gauge lines to the war effort. With the major movements of the front line in this sector in 1917 and 1918, the response of the narrow gauge railways is considered chronologically as well as by area, in the context of overall railway policy and development. After the war the light railways contributed to the reconstruction of the devastated areas, and then in some places served the sugar beet industry. The metre gauge railways were rebuilt or repaired. The story is followed to the closure of the last of these railways in the 1960s.

This book is a companion volume to Narrow Gauge in the Arras Sector (Pen & Sword Transport, 2015) by the same authors. It refers also to other previous works on British and French railways in the First World War, but contains sufficient information to stand alone. It describes how to find key locations now, and where rolling stock can be seen. Some walks are included for those who wish to explore the territory.

Vintage Airfix Review:

No review currently available.

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An Encyclopaedia of British Bridges

By David McFetrich

An Encyclopaedia of British BridgesDescription:

Bridges have a universal appeal as examples of man’s mastery of nature, from picturesque packhorse bridges to great spans stretching across broad estuaries, and the development of the technology that allows ever more audacious constructions is never-ending.

Of the million or more bridges throughout Great Britain, David McFetrich has selected those that are significant in terms of their design, construction or location, or of their connections with people or events of history. His definitive book contains 1,600 separate entries for individual bridge sites or related groups of bridges covering more than 2,000 different structures, 165 general entries about different types of bridge and such topics as collapses and failures, and a summary of about 200 record-holding bridges in 50 different categories. The concise text is supported by more than 900 illustrations and diagrams..

The result is a fascinating and readily accessible compendium.

Vintage Airfix Review:

No review currently available.

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An Indian Summer of Steam

By David Maidment

An Indian Summer of SteamDescription:

'An Indian Summer of Steam' is the second volume of David Maidment's 'railway' autobiography, following his first book 'A Privileged Journey', published in xxxx. David was a railway enthusiast who made the hobby his career. After management training on the Western Region, between 1961 and 1964, he became a stationmaster in a Welsh Valley, an Area Manager on the Cardiff – Swansea main line and radiating valleys, the South Wales Train Planning Officer, the Head of Productivity Services for the Western Region and subsequently the British Railways Board, before four years from 1982 as Chief Operating Manager of the London Midland Region, the BRB's first Quality & Reliability Manager in 1986, and finally British Rail's Head of Safety Policy after the Clapham Junction train accident, until privatisation.rn This experience led to a number of years as an international railway safety consultant, and, as a result of an encounter on an Indian railway station during a business trip abroad, to found the 'Railway Children' charity to support street children living on the rail and bus stations of India, East Africa and the UK, described in 2012 by an officer of the United Nations Human Rights Commission as the largest charity in the world working exclusively for street children. All this is the background to the descriptions the author gives of the last years of steam and his many journeys and experiences during his training in South Wales and the South West, his travels all over BR from 1962 until the end of steam in 1968, his search for steam in France, East and West Germany and China and the steam specials in Britain, France, Germany and China after the demise of regular steam working. The book includes over 100 black and white and 100 colour photos, most taken by the author during his travels, and nearly forty pages of logs of locomotive performance in Britain and the continent. rn All royalties from the book are being donated by the author to the charity he founded, a brief description of which is included in the last chapter of the book.

Vintage Airfix Review:

No review currently available.

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An Introduction to Great Western Locomotive Development

By Jim Champ

An Introduction to Great Western Locomotive DevelopmentDescription:

The first thought, when contemplating a new study of the Great Western Railway locomotive fleet, must surely be to ask what can there be left to say? But there is no single source which gives a general introduction to the Great Western locomotive fleet. There are monographs on individual classes, an excellent multi-volume detail study from the RCTS, and superb collections of photographs, but nothing that brings it all together. This work is intended to provide that general introduction.

The volume begins with a series of short essays covering general trends in design development, whilst the main body of the volume covers individual classes. For each class there is a small table containing some principal dimensions and paragraphs of text, covering an introduction, renumbering, key changes in the development of the class and information on withdrawal.

The volume concludes with appendices covering the development and types of standard boilers, the various numbering schemes used by the GWR, the arcane subject of locomotive diagrams and lot numbers, and a short reference on the many lines the GWR engulfed.

The majority of illustrations are new profile drawings to a consistent format. Described as sketches, they are drawn to consistent scales, but do not claim to be scale drawings. Much minor equipment has been omitted and the author has certainly not dared to include rivets! Although most are based around GWR weight diagrams, they are not simple traces of the original drawings. Detail has been added from other sources, components copied from different drawings and details have been checked against historical and modern photographs. One must also bear in mind that steam locomotives were not mass produced. Minor fittings frequently varied in position and changes were made over the locomotives' lifetimes. Nevertheless, this collection of drawings provides a uniquely consistent view of the GWR locomotive fleet.

Vintage Airfix Review:

No review currently available.

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Armoured Trains

By Lt Col. PAUL MALMASSARI

Armoured TrainsDescription:

The military was quick to see the advantages of railways in warfare, whether for the rapid deployment of men or the movement of heavy equipment like artillery. From here it was a short step to making the train a potent weapon in its own right – a mobile fort or a battleship on rails. Armed and armoured, they became the first practical self-propelled war machines, which by the time of the American Civil War were able to make a significant contribution to battlefield success.

Thereafter, almost every belligerent nation with a railway system made some use of armoured rolling stock, ranging from low-intensity colonial policing to the massive employment of armoured trains during the Russian Civil War. And although they were somewhat eclipsed as frontline weapons by the development of the tank and other AFVs, armoured trains retained a role as late as the civil wars in the former republic of Yugoslavia.

This truly encyclopaedic book covers, country by country, the huge range of fighting equipment that rode the rails over nearly two centuries. While it outlines the place of armoured trains in the evolution of warfare, it concentrates on details of their design through a vast array of photographs and the author’s meticulous drawings. Published in French in 1989, this highly regarded work has been completely revised and expanded for this English edition. It remains the last word on the subject.

Vintage Airfix Review:

No review currently available.

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Around Britain by Canal

By Anthony Burton

Around Britain by CanalDescription:

This is the story of a thousand mile-long trip around England by canal. At times the journey took the author out into the beautiful countryside, and elsewhere the canal crept round the edge of old industrial towns.

It is a journey that proved full of surprises, delights and rich variety, as the book clearly demonstrates. The book illustrates the great contrasts between travelling on the wide tidal waters of the River Trent and being overtaken by sea-going cargo ships, to meadnering along the sinuous curves of the Oxford Canal. The Leeds & Liverpool Canal brought magnificent moorland scenery and the drama of the great five-lock staircase at Bingley. London was seen from two very different perspectives. Travelling past the elegant houses of Little Venice and Regents Park and then turning back along the Thames to float past the Houses of Parliament. The author finds as much pleasure in the hidden corners of Birmingham as in the rural beauties of Shropshire.

The book has become regarded as a classic of canal travel, and is reissued with previously unpublished colour photographs taken by Phillip Lloyd, who shared the trip with the author.

Vintage Airfix Review:

No review currently available.

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