Trams And Buses - Vintage Airfix


Trams and Buses books

All these titles are available to purchase from Pen and Sword.

Contents:
- Regional Tramways - The North West of England, Post 1945 - By Peter Waller..
- Regional Tramways - Wales, Isle of Man and Ireland, Post 1945 - By Peter Waller..
- Regional Tramways - Yorkshire and North East of England - By Peter Waller..
- Return to Isle of Man Transport - By Martin Jenkins, Charles Roberts..
- The British Transport Commission Group - By Jim Blake..
- The Colours of London Buses 1970s - By Kevin McCormack..
- The London Bendy Bus - By Matthew Wharmby..
- The London DMS - By Matthew Wharmby..
- The London Enviro 400 - By Matthew Wharmby..
- The London Leylands - By Jim Blake..
- The London LS - By Matthew Wharmby..
- The National Rifle Association Its Tramways and the London & South Western Railway - By Christopher Bunch..
- Trams and Trolleybuses in Doncaster - By Dr Richard Buckley..
- Trolleybus Twilight - By Jim Blake..
- Works Trams of the British Isles - By Peter Waller..

 


 

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Regional Tramways - The North West of England, Post 1945

By Peter Waller

Regional Tramways - The North West of England, Post 1945Description:

This is the third in the 'Regional Tramways' series that covers the history of tramway operation in the British Isles.

Focusing on North-West England, the book provides an overview of the history of tramways in the region from the 1860s, when one of the pioneering horse trams that predated the Tramways Act of 1870 operated in Birkenhead (the first tramway to operate in the British Isles), through to the closures of the last traditional tramways (Stockport and Liverpool) in 1951 and 1957. It also looks at one great survivor the tramway in Blackpool that, fully modernized, continues to operate in the twenty-first century.

Concentrating on the systems that survived into 1945 Blackburn, Blackpool, Bolton, Bury, Darwen, Liverpool, Manchester, Oldham, Salford, SHMD and Stockport the book provides a comprehensive narrative, detailing the history of these operations from 1945 onwards, with full fleet lists, maps and details of route openings and closures.

The story is supported by almost 200 illustrations, both colour and black and white, many of which have never been published before, that portray the trams that operated in these towns and cities, and the routes on which they operated. Bringing the story up to date, the book also examines the one second-generation tramway built in the region Manchester Metrolink as well as informing readers where it is still possible to see surviving first-generation trams from the region in preservation.

Vintage Airfix Review:

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Regional Tramways - Wales, Isle of Man and Ireland, Post 1945

By Peter Waller

Regional Tramways - Wales, Isle of Man and Ireland, Post 1945Description:

This is the fourth book in a series that covers the history of the tram systems of the British Isles post-war. It covers the networks in Wales, the Isle of Man and Ireland.

Peter Waller examines the history of the tramways in Ireland, Wales and on the Isle of Man. With three different legislative frameworks, the history of the systems covered are very different – from the surviving horse tramway at Douglas on the Isle of Man through to the new Luas system operating in Dublin.

With an overview that provides the background to all of the tramways that once operated – plus the only tramway in the Channel Islands – alongside a comprehensive account of those systems that survived after 1945, the book is a fascinating portrait of the changing streetscapes of cities like Belfast and Cardiff as well as the remarkable survivor post-war, such as the Bessbrook & Newry and the Llandudno & Colwyn Bay.

Fully illustrated throughout with mono and colour illustrations – many of which have never been published before – as well as system maps, the book will be of interest to all with a history of trams – past and present – in the British Isles.

Vintage Airfix Review:

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Regional Tramways - Yorkshire and North East of England

By Peter Waller

Regional Tramways - Yorkshire and North East of EnglandDescription:

This is the second of a new series of books that will cover the history of tramway operation in the British Isles. Focusing on Yorkshire and the North-East of England, this book provides an overview of the history of tramways in the region from the 1860s, when one of the pioneering horse trams that predated the Tramways Act of 1870 operated for a brief period in Darlington, through to the closures of the last traditional tramways – Leeds and Sheffield – in 1959 and 1960, respectively. Concentrating on the systems that survived into 1945 – Bradford, Gateshead, Hull, Leeds, Newcastle, Rotherham, Sheffield, South Shields and Sunderland – the book provides a comprehensive narrative, detailing the history of these operations from 1945 onwards, with full fleet lists, maps and details of route openings and closures. The story is supported by some 200 illustrations, both colour and black and white, many of which have never been published before, that portray the trams that operated in these towns and cities and the routes on which they operated. Bringing the story up-to-date, the book also examines the two second-generation tramways built in the region – the Tyne & Wear Metro and Sheffield Supertram – as well as informing readers where it is still possible to see surviving first-generation trams from the region in preservation.

Vintage Airfix Review:

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Return to Isle of Man Transport

By Martin Jenkins, Charles Roberts

Return to Isle of Man TransportDescription:

This is the second book by Martin Jenkins and Charles Roberts about transport in the Isle of Man.

The first volume – described in Classic Bus as a “splendid book [which] takes you on a wonderfully nostalgic journey all round the island in lovely photographs” and by one Amazon reviewer as “a captivating book of beautiful and well-reproduced colour photos” – covered the steam railway, shipping and Road Services buses.

This book, using many previously unpublished rare early colour pictures, completes the coverage by looking at the Manx Electric and Snaefell Mountain Railways, as well as the buses and horse trams of Douglas Corporation.

The authors have managed to collect together some truly interesting and often stunning pictures, from a period when colour coverage of transport subjects was almost non-existent.

Vintage Airfix Review:

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The British Transport Commission Group

By Jim Blake

The British Transport Commission GroupDescription:

This fascinating and informative book looks at the Tilling Group of bus companies during the 1960s. These operated approximately half of the inter-urban and rural bus services in England and Wales, and were nationalised by Clement Attlee's Labour Government in 1948 under the control of the British Transport Commission. Ownership passed to the Transport Holding Company Ltd in 1963, though the fleets remained under Tilling Group control.

During the period covered by this book, the operators within the group had very standardised fleets, with the vast majority of their buses and coaches having Bristol chassis and Eastern Coachworks (ECW) bodywork. This was a result of these manufacturers also having been nationalised and controlled by the BTC and THC.

However, some Tilling Group operators still had earlier vehicles with, for instance, AEC or Leyland chassis, which were acquired prior to the requirement for them to buy only Bristol products, whilst some also had coaches with Bedford or Ford Thames chassis built in the 1950s and 1960s.

Unlike the BET fleets throughout England and Wales, most Tilling fleets also had highly standardised liveries, either of red with cream relief, or green with cream relief for their stage carriage buses, or the reverse of this for their coaches. There were some exceptions, though. The most obvious ones were Midland General and Notts & Derby, whose livery was an attractive dark blue and cream; as well as the Royal Blue coaches of Southern and Western National and the maroon and cream coaches of Thames Valley subsidiary South Midland.

All Tilling Group companies became part of the National Bus Company in early 1969, and before long their traditional liveries became just a memory when the NBC imposed standard red or green liveries.

Throughout most of the 1960s, Jim Blake travelled to these operators and photographed their vehicles, and spent many summer Saturdays at London's Victoria Coach Station, where their service buses as well as express coaches could be seen. He was fortunate to capture much of this changing transport scene on film, and presents some of these photographs in this volume. Many have never been published before.

Vintage Airfix Review:

No review currently available.

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The Colours of London Buses 1970s

By Kevin McCormack

The Colours of London Buses 1970sDescription:

This is a colour album of London Buses concentrating mainly on the 1970s which was the first decade since London Transport's inception in 1933 to feature a large number of buses on London streets which were not painted in the mainly all-red (or in a few cases, all-green) livery with which people are familiar. Vehicles in the traditional London liveries have not been ignored but many of the pictures depict this remarkably colourful era and often against the backdrop of famous or historically interesting landmarks which the author has been able to describe. As far as is known, none of the photographs has been published before, and the vast majority were taken by one photographer, sadly now deceased, who had the foresight to compose his picture well. The author is a well-known London Bus enthusiast and this is his 34th transport book and second for Pen & Sword.

Vintage Airfix Review:

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The London Bendy Bus

By Matthew Wharmby

The London Bendy BusDescription:

Between 2002 and 2006 six of London’s bus companies put into service 390 articulated ‘bendy’ buses on twelve routes for transport in London.

During what turned out to be a foreshortened nine years in service, the Mercedes-Benz Citaro G buses familiar on the continent and worldwide earned an unenviable reputation in London; according to who you read and who you believed, they caught fire at the drop of a hat, they maimed cyclists, they drained revenue from the system due to their susceptibility to fare evasion, they transported already long-suffering passengers in standing crush loads like cattle and they contributed to the extinction of the Routemaster from frontline service. In short, it was often referred to as ‘the bus we hated’.

This account is an attempt by a long-time detractor of the bendy buses to set the vehicles in their proper context – not quite to rehabilitate them, but to be as fair as is possible towards a mode of transport which felt about as un-British as could be.

Vintage Airfix Review:

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The London DMS

By Matthew Wharmby

The London DMSDescription:

Vilified as the great failure of all London Transport bus classes, the DMS family of Daimler Fleetline was more like an unlucky victim of straitened times. Desperate to match staff shortages with falling demand for its services during the late 1960s, London Transport was just one organisation to see nationwide possibilities and savings in legislation that was about to permit double-deck one-man-operation and partially fund purpose-built vehicles. However, prohibited by circumstances from developing its own rear-engined Routemaster (FRM) concept, LT instituted comparative trials between contemporary Leyland Atlanteans and Daimler Fleetlines. The latter came out on top, and massive orders followed, the first DMSs entering service on 2 January 1971.

In service, however, problems quickly manifested. Sophisticated safety features served only to burn out gearboxes and gulp fuel. The passengers, meanwhile, did not appreciate being funnelled through the DMS’s recalcitrant automatic fare-collection machinery only to have to stand for lack of seating. Boarding speeds thus slowed to a crawl, to the extent that the savings made by laying off conductors had to be negated by adding more DMSs to converted routes!

Second thoughts caused the ongoing order to be amended to include crew-operated Fleetlines (DMs), noise concerns prompted the development of the B20 ‘quiet bus’ variety, and brave attempts were made to fit the buses into the time-honoured system of overhauling at Aldenham Works, but finally the problems proved too much. After enormous expenditure, the first DMSs began to be withdrawn before the final RTs came out of service, and between 1979 and 1983 all but the B20s were sold – as is widely known, the DMSs proved perfectly adequate with provincial operators once their London features had been removed.

OPO was to become fashionable again in the 1980s as the politicians turned on London Transport itself, breaking it into pieces in order to sell it off. Not only did the B20 DMSs survive to something approaching a normal lifespan, but the new cheap operators awakening with the onset of tendering made use of the type to undercut LT, and it was not until 1993 that the last DMS operated.

Vintage Airfix Review:

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The London Enviro 400

By Matthew Wharmby

The London Enviro 400Description:

Developed by Alexander Dennis in 2005 as an all-encompassing replacement for the Dennis Trident and its two bodies, the Plaxton President and Alexander ALX400, the integral Enviro400, immediately sold in large numbers, not least to London operators, which in the next eight years bought over 1,500 of them. Late in the production run, the hybrid E40H was introduced and also made good headway in London, funded largely by environmental grants. Nearly 300 of these are in service in London.

Valid to May 2015, this book finishes by introducing the MMC, the all-new development of the Enviro400 unveiled in 2014 and exemplified in London so far by two batches for Abellio and Metroline.

Vintage Airfix Review:

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The London Leylands

By Jim Blake

The London LeylandsDescription:

LONDON'S FAMOUS RT-TYPE BUSES were an iconic symbol of our Capital city in the 1950s, before being superseded by the Routemasters. Most were built between 1947 and 1954 to replace worn-out pre-war and wartime buses, as well as our remaining trams. More than 7,000 were built in all and although London Transport favoured A.E.C. chassis, which the first batches of RTs had, so pressing was the need for new buses that not enough could be supplied by that manufacturer to match demand. Therefore Leyland Motors were contracted to adapt their Leyland "Titan" PD2 chassis to fit bodies that, for the most part, were identical with those on RTs. The result was the 1,631-strong RTL class, together with the 500 RTWs, which had bodies also built by Leyland to the same general design, were built between 1948 and 1954. Always in a minority compared to the 4,825-strong RT class, these Leyland buses had a character all of their own, perhaps personified by their louder engine note. They also had a reputation for being heavier on their steering than the RTs, making them unpopular with staff, and therefore general withdrawal of them commenced in 1958, taking almost ten years to complete (in November 1968), whereas the RTs soldiered on until April 1979. During the RTL and RTW class buses' final years, Jim Blake was out and about photographing them throughout London. A selection of his photographs of them, most previously unpublished, is presented here. Nearly fifty years after their demise from London's streets, the RTLs and RTWs still have a firm following amongst bus enthusiasts and preservationists alike, and it is to them that this book is dedicated!

Vintage Airfix Review:

No review currently available.

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The London LS

By Matthew Wharmby

The London LSDescription:

Dissatisfied with the reliability of its AEC Merlin and Swift single-deck buses, London Transport in 1973 purchased six Leyland Nationals for evaluation. Liking what it saw of this ultimate standard product, where even the paint swatch was of Leyland’s choice, LT took up an option to buy fifty more from a cancelled export order and then bought further batches of 110, 30 and 140 to bring the LS class to 437 members by the middle of 1980. A year later the last MBAs and SMSs were replaced on Red Arrow services by sixty-nine new Leyland National 2s.

Straightforward but reliable, the LS satisfied London Transport’s single-deck needs for a decade and a half, often standing in for double-deckers when needed, and then going on to help hold the fort during the tough years of early tendering, during which some innovative LS operations introduced several new liveries and identities. The type served the ten years expected out of it with few worries, only starting to disappear when minibuses came on strength at the end of the 1980s. Although the LS was formally retired by 1992, refurbishment programmes gave survivors an extended lease of life, bringing us the National Greenway, the ultimate development of the Leyland National. Most of the Red Arrow National 2s thus became GLSs, and lasted until 2002.

Matthew Wharmby is an author, photographer and editor specialising in London bus history. His published books include London Transport’s Last Buses: Leyland Olympians L 1-263, Routemaster Requiem and Routemaster Retrospective (with Geoff Rixon), London Transport 1970-1984 (with R. C. Riley), The London Titan and The London Metrobus. He has also written many articles for Buses, Bus & Coach Preservation, Classic Bus and London Bus Magazine.

Vintage Airfix Review:

No review currently available.

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The National Rifle Association Its Tramways and the London & South Western Railway

By Christopher Bunch

The National Rifle Association Its Tramways and the London & South Western RailwayDescription:

In 1859, as a result of the perceived threat to Great Britain from the large increase in conscript armies on the Continent and especially the growing power of France, and given further impetus by a public outcry for improvements in the Country’s defence, a new Rifle Volunteer Movement, based on that of the Napoleonic Wars, was quickly formed to great popular enthusiasm.

This led, in the same year, to the formation of the National Rifle Association designed to encourage rifle shooting by the establishment of a great annual National Rifle Meeting open to both Volunteers and all-comers. There marksmen could compete for valuable prizes. To achieve this it was necessary to ensure that the location, initially on Wimbledon Common and later at Bisley, was readily accessible by train.

An extraordinary relationship now developed between the Association and the London and South Western Railway Company, and its successors, in fulfilling these aims. The culmination of this was the construction of the Bisley Camp Tramway which connected the L&SWR mainline at Brookwood with the NRA Camp. Interlinked with this is the fascinating story of the Association’s own unique tramways. These carried competitors and spectators to the more distant ranges as well as targets to the butts and for mobile targets. The military extensions to the Camp Tramway in both World Wars are also covered.

The book relates the history of the NRA and its tramways from its foundation until the end of the twentieth century largely through contemporary letters, documents and photographs.

Vintage Airfix Review:

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Trams and Trolleybuses in Doncaster

By Dr Richard Buckley

Trams and Trolleybuses in DoncasterDescription:

'Trams and Trolleybuses in Doncaster' is the first book in the new series 'Transport Through The Ages', brought to you by Wharncliffe Books. This delightful book traces the nostalgic journey of the trams, as a centenary history.In Doncaster, on June 2nd 1902, two major events took place; the peace agreement marking the end of the Boer War was celebrated and the town's electric tramways were opened. Richard Buckley's focus is obviously at the local level and how this astounding advent of mechanised urban transport was of great significance to the local residents of Doncaster. This authorative text tells the story of trams and trolleybuses and with 135 pictures that have never before been published this is a truly unique history. The fascinating pictures give you an impression of just how the people and places of that time have changed.Take yourself on a nostalgic journey, and see how the transitions have taken place through Doncaster, as you read 'Trams and Trolley Buses in Doncaster'.

Vintage Airfix Review:

No review currently available.

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Trolleybus Twilight

By Jim Blake

Trolleybus TwilightDescription:

In this new photographic album from Pen & Sword, transport historian and photographer Jim Blake presents a fascinating selection of pictures of a form of public transport now sadly missing from Britain's streets trolleybuses.

Most British trolleybus systems flourished in the inter-war years, particularly the 1930s. The biggest fleet was that of London Transport. But for the Second World War, it would have been bigger still if South London's trams had been replaced by trolleybuses, as intended. London, however, replaced these with motor-buses instead, influencing other operators to abandon their trolleybuses, too. By the 1960s, their demise was well under way.

Fortunately, during that decade, Jim traveled throughout England and Wales, photographing buses, coaches, steam locomotives and trolleybuses. This book features the latter, beginning with their final weeks in London, then continuing to places as diverse as Bournemouth and Cardiff, Bradford and Maidstone.

Most pictures have never been published before. Taken between 1962 and 1968, they transport the reader back to a wonderful land with many quaint forms of public transport, particularly trolleybuses! What will strike readers is their variety of liveries, manufacturers and so on.

Britain's last trolleybuses ran in 1972. Despite many other world cities having modern trolleybus systems today, it will be a long time before they return to our streets, if ever! How sad when our cities are polluted by vehicles powered by internal combustion engines: trolleybuses are completely pollution-free!

Vintage Airfix Review:

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Works Trams of the British Isles

By Peter Waller

Works Trams of the British IslesDescription:

Often little known and generally unfamiliar to the passengers that used tramways, works trams were an essential facet of the efficient operation of any system – large or small – and this book is a primarily pictorial overview of the great variety of works trams that served the first generation of tramways in the British Isles. Although construction of most tramways was left to the contractor employed on the work, once this was completed the responsibility for the maintenance and safe operation of the system fell on the operator. The larger the operator, the greater and more varied the fleet of works cars employed; specialist vehicles were constructed for specific duties. Smaller operators, however, did not have this luxury, relying instead on one or two dedicated works cars or, more often, a passenger car temporarily assigned to that work. This book is a pictorial survey to the many weird and wonderful works cars that once graced Britain’s first generation tramways.

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