Trains And Railways - Vintage Airfix


Trains and Railways books

All these titles are available to purchase from Pen and Sword.

Contents:
- The Locomotive Pioneers - By Anthony Burton..
- The Modified Bulleid Pacifics - By Tim Hillier-Graves..
- The National Rifle Association Its Tramways and the London & South Western Railway - By Christopher Bunch..
- The North British Type 2 Bo-Bo Diesel-Electric Classes 21 & 29 - By Anthony Sayer..
- The North Yorkshire Moors Railway - By Michael Vanns..
- The Pacer Family - By Fred Kerr..
- The Princess Royal Pacifics - By Tim Hillier-Graves..
- The Privatisation Classes - By David Cable..
- The Quintinshill Conspiracy - By Jack Richards, Adrian Searle..
- The Race to the North - By David Wragg..
- The Railway - British Track Since 1804 - By Andrew Dow..
- The Railway Builders - By Anthony Burton..
- The Railway Haters - By David L Brandon, Alan Brooke..
- The Railway Preservation Revolution - By Jonathan Brown..
- The Red Line - By Christopher Knowles..

 


 

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The Locomotive Pioneers

By Anthony Burton

The Locomotive PioneersDescription:

This fascinating book explores the development of locomotives over the course of fifty years. From Richard Trevithick's first experimental road engine of 1801 up to the Great Exhibition some fifty years later, locomotives have come far in reimagining and reinventing themselves to serve the people and British industry.

The early years showed slow development amongst locomotives: Trevithick's first railway locomotives failed significantly as the engine broke the brittle cast-iron rails. The story is continued through the years when locomotives were developed to serve collieries, a period that lasted for a quarter of a century, and saw many different engineers trying out their ideas; from the rack and pinion railway developed by Blenkinsop and Murray, to George Stephenson's engines for the Stockton & Darlington Railway. The most significant change came with Robert Stephenson's innovative Rocket, the locomotive that set the formula for future developments.

British engineers dominated the early years, although in France Marc Seguin developed a multi-tubular boiler at the same time as Stephenson. The next period was marked by the steady spread of railways in Europe and across the Atlantic. Timothy Hackworth of the Stockton & Darlington railway supplied locomotives to Russia, and his men had an exciting ride to deliver parts by sleigh across the snowy steppes, pursued by wolves. In America, the first locomotives were delivered from England, but the Americans soon developed their own methods and styles, culminating in the Baldwin engines, a type that has become familiar to us from hundreds of Western films.

This is more than just a book about the development of a vital technology, it is also the story of the men who made it possible, from the steadily reliable team of William Buddicom and Alexander Allan, who developed their locomotives at Crewe, to the flamboyant Isambard Kingdom Brunel, whose broad gauge was served by the magnificent engines of Daniel Gooch.

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The Modified Bulleid Pacifics

By Tim Hillier-Graves

The Modified Bulleid PacificsDescription:

Oliver Bulleid’s Pacifics were perhaps the most controversial steam locomotives ever built in Britain. They seem to been loved and loathed in equal measure and the debate over their strengths and weaknesses took on a new dimension when BR decided to modify them in the 1950s. It was argued that they were too costly to operate and maintain, by comparison to other types available. Their time out of service, due to breakdowns, was also increasing to an unacceptable level, and some of Bulleid’s innovations were believed to be more hindrance than help. Rightly or wrongly BR were faced with a costly scrap and build programme or seek to make the engines more reliable. To Ron Jarvis, an engineer of note, fell the job of saving Bulleid’s enigmatic locomotives in a bid to satisfy the demands of the service. And he displayed a master’s touch in the programme that followed, saving the best of Bulleid’s work and adopting other established design principles. What emerged was described by Bert Spencer, Gresley’s talented assistant, as taking ‘a swan and creating a soaring eagle’. This book explores all the elements of the lives of these Pacifics and their two designers. It draws on previously unpublished material to describe their gradual evolution, which didn’t start or finish with the 1950s major rebuilding programme.

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The National Rifle Association Its Tramways and the London & South Western Railway

By Christopher Bunch

The National Rifle Association Its Tramways and the London & South Western RailwayDescription:

In 1859, as a result of the perceived threat to Great Britain from the large increase in conscript armies on the Continent and especially the growing power of France, and given further impetus by a public outcry for improvements in the Country’s defence, a new Rifle Volunteer Movement, based on that of the Napoleonic Wars, was quickly formed to great popular enthusiasm.

This led, in the same year, to the formation of the National Rifle Association designed to encourage rifle shooting by the establishment of a great annual National Rifle Meeting open to both Volunteers and all-comers. There marksmen could compete for valuable prizes. To achieve this it was necessary to ensure that the location, initially on Wimbledon Common and later at Bisley, was readily accessible by train.

An extraordinary relationship now developed between the Association and the London and South Western Railway Company, and its successors, in fulfilling these aims. The culmination of this was the construction of the Bisley Camp Tramway which connected the L&SWR mainline at Brookwood with the NRA Camp. Interlinked with this is the fascinating story of the Association’s own unique tramways. These carried competitors and spectators to the more distant ranges as well as targets to the butts and for mobile targets. The military extensions to the Camp Tramway in both World Wars are also covered.

The book relates the history of the NRA and its tramways from its foundation until the end of the twentieth century largely through contemporary letters, documents and photographs.

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The North British Type 2 Bo-Bo Diesel-Electric Classes 21 & 29

By Anthony Sayer

The North British Type 2 Bo-Bo Diesel-Electric Classes 21 & 29Description:

This book provides an in-depth history of the North British diesel-electric Type 2 locomotives which were constructed by the North British Locomotive Company in Glasgow during the late-1950s / early-1960s for use on the Eastern and Scottish Regions of British Railways.

"Despite efforts to improve their poor performance in traffic, by both engine refurbishment or complete replacement, these locomotives were all withdrawn from service by the end of 1971.

"Using significant quantities of previously unpublished material, dramatic new insights are revealed about both the original Class 21s and the rebuilt Class 29s, including detailed research into the whole rebuilding decision-making process, as well as providing fully dated information about works visits, periods in storage, detail difference modifications and livery changes.

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The North Yorkshire Moors Railway

By Michael Vanns

The North Yorkshire Moors RailwayDescription:

This fantastic guide traces the history of, arguably, the most popular heritage railway in Britain from the origins of the line in the 1830s through the good, bad and controversial times, up to the present day.

Every year since 1973, the North Yorkshire Moors Railway (NYMR) has transported hundreds of thousands of visitors in preserved steam and diesel-hauled trains between Pickering and Grosmont through an ancient landscape of unmatched beauty. When those trains started to run regularly to and from Whitby in 2007, it revived a service started by the Whitby & Pickering Railway Company back in 1836.

The history of the NYMR is a fascinating one that will do well to be remembered. This book explores the journey, development and changes of the NYMR and is a fantastic guide to how the railway industry has changed over time.

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The Pacer Family

By Fred Kerr

The Pacer FamilyDescription:

In the 1980s British Railways sought a cheap replacement for the ailing Diesel Multiple Unit (DMU) trainsets which saw the introduction of the Class 14x trainsets that became known as Pacers. These proved to be cheap to operate hence popular with the operators but less popular with the travelling public who found the rigid 4-wheel chassis provided a basic and uncomfortable ride.

Fred Kerr, a life-long rail enthusiast and well-known railway photographer, became familiar with these trainsets when the Class 141 trainsets passed near to his parent’s house in Corby whilst being trialled between Derby and Bedford and, later, when the Class 142 trainsets appeared in his home town of Southport as part of the driver training programme for Wigan crews prior to working local services to Manchester.

He has continued taking photographs of the Pacer trainsets, which he sees as part of the evolving traction changes, hence has a collection of images from the various stages of the Pacer history that forms the basis of this album. The images cover a wide variety of locations and, surprisingly, reveal little known facets of their life; the rarity of Class 141 trainsets initially provided with Workington Blue livery, the unusual operation of Newcastle-based trainsets on the Windermere branch and the wide variety of trainsets that have operated in his home county of Lancashire.

The Pacer trainsets were introduced in the mid-1980s and will be withdrawn by 2020, due to their failure to meet the requirements of the Rail Vehicle Accessibility (Interoperable Rail System) Regulation 2008. Fred Kerr’s book chronicles their contribution, during their years of service, to the operation of railway services, many of which would otherwise have been closed without the availability of the “cheap and cheerful” Pacer trainsets. As they enter their final years of service, this album celebrates the many services that have been operated, the builders who supplied them and the operators who have used them on their services throughout the years.

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The Princess Royal Pacifics

By Tim Hillier-Graves

The Princess Royal PacificsDescription:

When Stanier joined the LMS in 1932, as their CME, he was expected to breathe new life into this ailing giant. Since its formation it had steadily lost ground to its main rival, the LNER. In Doncaster, Nigel Gresley and his team, with an eye to advancing locomotive design at the same time as making the company commercially successful, had quickly begun producing a series of high performance and iconic Pacific engines to pull their high profile express trains. Their impact left the LMS trailing in their wake.

Under previous CMEs, the LMS had concentrated on 4-6-0 designs to pull their express services, but many felt they lacked sufficient power and had little to offer in performance or glamour when compared to their rivals.

Stanier, heavily influenced by his mentor, George Churchward, his work on the GWR and the potential of the Pacific design, saw such a class as essential to the success of the LMS. And so the Princess Royal Class came into being, against a background of some opposition and cultural differences. Despite this, they proved their worth and became popular with their crew and managers. Within a few short years, however, their premier position in the company had been taken by a very worthy successor, the Princess Coronation Class.

Overshadowed and often overlooked, they tend to be seen as a stepping stone to something better. Yet, in reality they stand up well to the closest scrutiny, and this book tells the story of these engines through the eyes of those who came into contact with them. They also best represent the impact William Stanier had on locomotive design and best describe the way he changed the culture of the LMS to allow it to grow successfully. It is a story of great endeavor and courage that can only be told by revealing and discussing political, social, economic and engineering issues.

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The Privatisation Classes

By David Cable

The Privatisation ClassesDescription:

Post Privatisation Diesels and Electrics is an album of photographs taken by David Cable, a well-regarded author of several books covering trains throughout much of the world.

This book looks at the types of locomotives and multiple units that have been introduced into the UK since 1994, when the government privatised British Rail into a series of privately operated franchises.

An incredible forty-one classes have been, or are shortly to be introduced, the majority being passenger units. The book shows these classes in a variety of colour schemes adopted by the franchisees.

Photographs, in the main, are taken in the South East of England, which is where the great majority of these new trains operate, with the surroundings being given as much prominence as possible.

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The Quintinshill Conspiracy

By Jack Richards, Adrian Searle

The Quintinshill ConspiracyDescription:

Quintinshill was the railway's Titanic - a horrific crash involving five trains in which 230 died and 246 were injured, it remains the worst disaster in the long history of Britain's rail network.

The location was the isolated signal box at Quintinshill, on the Anglo-Scottish border near Gretna; the date, 22 May 1915. Most of the casualties were Scottish soldiers on their way to fight in the Gallipoli campaign. Territorials setting off for war on a distant battlefield, they were cut down instead on home soil – victims, it was said, of serious incompetence and a shoddy regard for procedure in the signal box. Two signalmen were sent to prison. 

But startling new evidence reveals that the failures which led to the disaster were far more complex and wide-reaching than signalling negligence. The Quintinshill Conspiracy – The Shocking True Story Behind Britain's Worst Rail Disaster exposes what really happened, and why.

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The Race to the North

By David Wragg

The Race to the NorthDescription:

In the late nineteenth century, some of Britain’s leading main-line railway companies threw caution to the winds in an attempt to provide the fastest passenger express services between London and Scotland. These became known as the ‘races to the north’. There were two phases, in 1888 and 1895, and they spurred the building of new bridges across the Firth of Forth and Firth of Tay.

David Wragg’s gripping, detailed narrative tells the story of this epic engineering and commercial competition. He concentrates on the determination of the railway companies to see who could provide the fastest schedule between London and the main Scottish cities of Edinburgh, Glasgow, Perth, Dundee and Aberdeen.

Casting aside their early policy of co-existence on these prestigious and lucrative routes, the West Coast and East Coast companies were drawn into a period of intense, highly publicized rivalry as they sought to dominate the market. David Wragg gives an insight into the conduct of the well-publicized highs and tragic lows of this dramatic story – the extension of the lines to the far north, the building of the Tay and Forth bridges – including the collapse of the first Tay bridge with 72 fatalities – and the repeated bids by the companies to cut the journey times.

While he describes the public side of this fascinating story, David Wragg fills in the background, which is no less interesting – the pioneering engineering of the steam age, the massive construction projects, the cut-throat battle for passengers and freight and the deep inter-company rivalries that drove the rapid development of the railways during the Victorian period.

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The Railway - British Track Since 1804

By Andrew Dow

The Railway - British Track Since 1804Description:

Never before has a comprehensive history been written of the track used by railways of all gauges, tramways, and cliff railways, in Great Britain. And yet it was the development of track, every bit as much as the development of the locomotive, that has allowed our railways to provide an extraordinarily wide range of services. Without the track of today, with its laser-guided maintenance machines, the TGV and the Eurostar could not cruise smoothly at 272 feet per second, nor could 2,000-ton freight trains carry a wide range of materials, or suburban railways, over and under the ground, serve our great cities in a way that roads never could.

Andrew Dows account of the development of track, involving deep research in the papers of professional institutions as well as rare books, company records and personal accounts, paints a vivid picture of development from primitive beginnings to modernity.

The book contains nearly 200 specially-commissioned drawings as well as many photographs of track in its very many forms since the appearance of the steam locomotive in 1804. Included are chapters on electrified railways, and on the development of mechanised maintenance, which revolutionised the world of the platelayer.

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The Railway Builders

By Anthony Burton

The Railway BuildersDescription:

There are many books on railway history, but few publications on how railways were constructed. Railway Builders tells the remarkable story of how the promoters, engineers and contractors worked together to build the national network. It is also the story of the extraordinary army of men who did the hard, physical work – the railway navvies. These itinerant workers lived rough and were capable of immense feats of physical strength as they dug their way from one end of the country to the other.

There are many familiar names here, such as George and Robert Stephenson and Isambard Kingdom Brunel, but the book also looks at many lesser-known engineers and the great contractors, such as Thomas Brassey, who employed an army of navvies as large as the regular armies of some countries. This is a tale of how such great works of engineering, like the Forth Bridge, were constructed but also of disasters, such as the collapse of the Tay Bridge. It all makes for an epic tale of how, with very little help from machinery, the Victorians created a great rail network. The book was first published in the early 1990s and has been out of print for some years.

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The Railway Haters

By David L Brandon, Alan Brooke

The Railway HatersDescription:

The railways symbolised the changes taking place in Britain as a result of the Industrial Revolution, and they themselves greatly contributed to these changes. 'Old Wealth', in the form of the great landowning dynasties and the landed gentry, was under challenge from 'New Wealth' the energetic industrial and commercial, urban middle class. Railways, with powers of compulsory purchase, intruded brutally into the previously sacrosanct estates and pleasure grounds of Britain's traditional ruling elite and were part of this clash of class interests.

Aesthetes like Ruskin and poets like Wordsworth ranted against railways; Sabbatarians attacked them for providing employment on the Lord's Day; antiquarians accused them of vandalism by destroying ancient buildings; others claimed their noise would make cows abort and chickens cease laying.

Railways were controversial then and have continued to provoke debate ever since. Arguments raged concerning nationalisation and privatisation, about the Beeching Plan and around light rail systems in British cities and HS1 and HS2.

Examining railways from earliest times to the present, this book provides insights into social, economic and political attitudes and emphasises both change and continuity over 200 years.

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The Railway Preservation Revolution

By Jonathan Brown

The Railway Preservation RevolutionDescription:

A ride on a steam train is a popular family outing. More than 100 heritage railways cater for that demand, capturing the spirit of nostalgia while preserving the engines and equipment of past days of rail travel. Their interests even extend to the modern era of 1960s-70s diesels.

Those heritage railways themselves have a long pedigree, back to 1951, when a group of enthusiasts saved the Talyllyn Railway in mid-Wales from closure. They ran this railway as volunteers, out of their love of the little trains and a desire to keep it going. Their example was followed by many more preservation societies who preserved and restored branch lines, country lines and industrial lines for our enjoyment now.

Six decades have passed, and we are now beginning to realise what an impressive history the heritage railway movement has. This book traces that history, from the humble beginnings the hopes and ambitions of the pioneers on the different railway projects. There were times of failure and frustration, as some fell by the wayside, but others have made it through times of adversity to become the major heritage businesses of today.

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The Red Line

By Christopher Knowles

The Red LineDescription:

The Red Line is the story of a train journey from London to Hong Kong. It is set in 1981, the year Christopher made the first of twenty-four such journeys as a tour guide, when the Cold War was still very much a fact of life. Although China appeared to be on the brink of significant change, no one could know for certain; Poland was stirring but the prospect of change in the USSR and its other allies seemed remote. This made a journey by train across that landscape particularly fascinating, because by using standard, scheduled services that together created one of the longest possible railway routes, one was necessarily immersed in the various countries in ways that otherwise would have been impossible. Equally fascinating were the reactions of Western travellers to finding themselves incarcerated for weeks on end in the eccentric world behind the Iron Curtain.

In order to give the journey some coherence, the most memorable events over those years have been condensed into a single journey and the most notable personalities, plucked from various times and places, have been thrown together. To emphasise the fact that these events took place in the recent past, and to be able to show how extraordinarily quickly the world has changed in the few intervening years, the story is told by a narrator. Everything that occurs is true, although some circumstances have been slightly adapted for the sake of fluency and names of individuals have been changed.

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