Trains And Railways - Vintage Airfix


Trains and Railways books

All these titles are available to purchase from Pen and Sword.

Contents:
- Steam, Soot and Rust - By Colin Garratt..
- The German Pacific Locomotive - By David Maidment..
- The Golden Age of European Railways - By Christian Wolmar..
- The Great Central Railway - By Michael Vanns..
- The Great Eastern Railway in South Essex - By Charles Phillips..
- The Great Northern Atlantics - By James S Baldwin..
- The Great Train Robbery and the Metropolitan Police Flying Squad - By Geoff Platt..
- The Great Western Society - By Anthony Burton..
- The Hayling Island Branch - By John Scott-Morgan..
- The Historical Dictionary Railways in the British Isles - By David Wragg..
- The History of The Channel Tunnel - By Nicholas Faith..
- The Hixon Railway Disaster - By Richard Westwood..
- The L.B.S.C.R. Brighton Atlantics - By James S Baldwin..
- The Leicester Gap - By Michael Vanns..
- The Light Railways of Britain and Ireland - By Anthony Burton, John Scott-Morgan..

 


 

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Steam, Soot and Rust

By Colin Garratt

Steam, Soot and RustDescription:

The disappearance of the steam locomotive in the land of its birth touched the hearts of millions, but when the government announced the Modernisation Plan for Britain's railways in 1955, under which steam was to be phased out in favour of diesel and electric traction, few people took it seriously. Steam locomotives were an integral part of our daily lives and had been for almost one and a half centuries. Furthermore, they were still being built in large numbers. It was popularly believed that they would see the century out and probably well beyond that. 

But the reality was that by 1968 – a mere thirteen years after the Modernisation Plan – steam traction had disappeared from Britain's main line railways. It was harrowing to witness the breaking up of engines, which were the icons of their day, capable of working long-distance inter-city expresses weighing 400 tons on schedules faster than a mile a minute. Top speeds of 100mph were not unknown.

This book chronicles the last few years as scrap yards all over Britain went into overtime, cutting up thousands of locomotives and releasing a bounty of more than a million tons of scrap whilst the engines, which remained in service, were a shadow of their former selves; filthy, wheezing and clanking their way to an ignominious end. 

The pictures in this book are augmented by essays written by Colin Garratt at the time. Although steam disappeared from the main line network it survives in ever–dwindling numbers on industrial systems such as collieries, ironstone mines, power stations, shipyards, sugar factories, paper mills and docks. In such environments steam traction eked out a further decade and during this time many of the industrial locations closed rendering the locomotives redundant. The British steam locomotive was born amid the coalfields and was destined to die there one and three quarter centuries later.

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The German Pacific Locomotive

By David Maidment

The German Pacific LocomotiveDescription:

The German Pacific Locomotive (Its Design and Development) is David Maidments fourth book in the series of Locomotive Profiles published by Pen & Sword. It is the first in the series to tackle an important range of overseas steam locomotives, the German pacific locomotives, which, with the Paris-Orleans pacific in France, were the first of that wheel layout in Europe and came to be the dominant type for express passenger work throughout Western Europe for the following fifty years, until displaced by diesel and electric traction.

The German railways in the first two decades of the twentieth century were run principally as regional State railways, and two distinct styles of design developed, which were influenced by the natural terrain. In the south, in the mountainous foothills of the European Alps, four cylinder compound locomotives with comparatively small coupled wheels, most produced by the famous firm of Maffei in Munich, held sway from 1907 until the late 1930s, and in parts of Bavaria that were not yet electrified, even until the early 1960s. In the flatter lands of the north, Prussian 4-6-0s sufficed until Paul Wagners standard two cylinder simple pacifics came onto the scene in 1925, and were followed by the three cylinder streamlined pacifics at the start of the Second World War. After addressing the devastating damage to the German railways in the conflict, the book follows the modernisation of the locomotive fleet in the post-war period until the elimination of steam in both East and West Germany in the mid-late 1970s.

The book describes the design, construction and operation of the full range of pacifics that ran in both parts of Germany, and the large numbers of these locomotives that have been preserved, and is illustrated with over 180 black and white and 80 colour photos.

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The Golden Age of European Railways

By Christian Wolmar

The Golden Age of European RailwaysDescription:

One of the most important developments in European history, the railways helped create the social and economic fabric of the continent. In the 'Golden Age' of the railways, from the late nineteenth century to the early twentieth, there was no more exciting, exotic or desirable way to travel. 

As the major railway companies quickly became huge industrial powers in their own right, they began to influence the infrastructure of trade, industry, agriculture and settlement. In some countries the bulk of the railway network was centralised under state control, while in others corporate and personal fortunes were won and lost as railway fever spread far and wide. 

Crossing Stunning landscapes, linking the continent's greatest cities. And bringing natural wonders within the reach of ordinary people, the railways encouraged the growth of the tourism industry, which in turn spurred the development of dramatic poster art. 

All of these aspects of the early decades of European railway history are explored in this elegant, lavishly illustrated volume. The social, economic, environmental and technological challenges and achievements are all covered, together with highlights of the routes and the experiences of eager train passengers. 

The Golden Age of European Railways contains more than three hundred contemporary illustrations. As well as route maps, schedules, technical appendices and the fascinating perspectives of it award-winning writers and acknowledged railway experts.

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The Great Central Railway

By Michael Vanns

The Great Central RailwayDescription:

This compelling book centres on the Great Central Railways early history, focusing particularly on its drive to reach London. It follows the subsequent fortunes of the London Extension right up until its closure, and into the preservation era, examining the remarkable achievements of hundreds of enthusiasts and their continuing struggle to fulfil the aspirations of those 1969 visionaries.

In 1899 the Great Central Railway opened a new main line between Nottinghamshire and London. It was built to the highest of standards; civil and mechanical engineers able to benefit from the experience of over fifty years of British railway construction. It was a glorious achievement. Yet, despite incorporating some of the best facilities to enable it to operate in a more efficient way than its older rivals, it had a short working life compared to its contemporaries. By the end of the 1960s, most of it had closed. However, ironically, that abandonment by the state-owned British Railways presented an independent and enterprising group of railway enthusiasts with a unique opportunity to operate their own main line with their own engines. In 1969 the Main Line Preservation Group was formed with a vision to re-create a fully functioning, double track, steam-worked main line between Nottingham and Leicester.

This book explores the journey, development and changes of the Great Central Railway and is a fantastic guide to how the railway industry has changed over time.

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The Great Eastern Railway in South Essex

By Charles Phillips

The Great Eastern Railway in South EssexDescription:

The Great Eastern Railway In South Essex: A Definitive History is the history of the Great Eastern’s lines from Shenfield to Southend, Wickford to Southminster and Woodham Ferrers to Maldon including their ancestor. It is the only comprehensive history of all three lines and was researched using both previously published and unpublished material. The history covers not only the history of the lines in question but also a sample of services from the opening of them to the present day, the motive power that was and is used on them and a topographical description of them. The book is intended to appeal to wide audience: in particular those with an interest in the local history of the area served by the lines, those interested in the history of Essex and railway enthusiasts interested in the railways of the eastern counties in general and the Great Eastern Railway in particular.

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The Great Northern Atlantics

By James S Baldwin

The Great Northern AtlanticsDescription:

The Great Northern Atlantics, were the first locomotives constructed in Britain to the 4-4-2 wheel arrangement. The Atlantics were designed by H.G. Ivatt, locomotive Superintendent of The Great Northern Railway.

Introduced from 1898, with the construction at Doncaster Works of small boilered Atlantic number 990 Henry Oakley, which is now preserved in the National Collection at York, this type of locomotive became one of the most successful types in use on top link express work in the late Victorian and Edwardian era.

The small boilered type was followed in 1902, by the large boilered type, examples of which remained in traffic until the early 1950s. The two types of Great Northern Atlantic locomotives were retained in top link service on the L N E R well into the 1920s, as there were not enough of the new Gresley A1 Pacific's to take over top link diagrams.

As a result of the success of the Ivatt designed large boilered Atlantic, D. Earl-Marsh, who was in charge of the drawing office at Doncaster, designed his own version of the Ivatt machine, when he moved to Brighton Works as Locomotive Superintendent of the L B S C R.

The Great Northern Atlantics, like the Brighton machines had a large following which has continued to this day, with model engineers and small scale modellers continuing to construct fine live steam and electric drive models of these handsome locomotives.

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The Great Train Robbery and the Metropolitan Police Flying Squad

By Geoff Platt

The Great Train Robbery and the Metropolitan Police Flying SquadDescription:

The Squad that investigated The Great Train Robbery. "The Old Grey Fox" or "One Day Tommy" (Detective Chief Superintendent Tommy Butler) selected six of the best officers on the elite Metropolitan Police Flying Squad to investigate the Crime of the Century, but whilst many books have been written by and about every criminal arrested for this crime, NONE have been written about the detectives who traced and tracked them. Tommy Butler delayed his retirement to complete the job, but died a few months after he retired at 57 years of age, the only detective of his rank in the late 1950s and 1960s not to publish an autobiography.

This book provides a detailed account of the men tasked with tracking down the most notorious thieves in British history. It examines the investigation in detail and asks how it would contrast with the methods used today should a similar incident take place.

Geoff Platt examines what happened to these men after the investigation was closed and the effect it had on both their personal and professional lives.

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The Great Western Society

By Anthony Burton

The Great Western SocietyDescription:

This book tells the story of one of Britain's most successful heritage railway projects. Formed in 1960, The Great Western Society was founded by a group of school boys who wanted to save a Great Western Tank locomotive and an auto trailer.

Today that original project has blossomed into the best collection of Great western rolling stock and locomotives in the world.

This is the story of the Society and its members, who have made this possible.

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The Hayling Island Branch

By John Scott-Morgan

The Hayling Island BranchDescription:

The Hayling Island Branch was one of Britain's most iconic sea side lines, connecting Havant with Hayling Island via Langston Harbour. Opening in 1865 for freight and 1867 to passenger traffic, it was after a few years of local control, managed and operated as part of the London Brighton & South Coast Railway, who were responsible for its upkeep until the railway grouping in 1923, when it became a part of the Southern Railway. The railway had a colourful and bucolic existence, with trains headed by the attractive Stroudley Terrier class tank locomotives and a collection of vintage carriage stock. In 1948 the branch became part of the Southern Region of British Railways, carrying on as a local and at times heavily used branch line, until its closure in November 1963. Today the lines track bed is a walking path from end to end, with only the former goods shed at Hayling Island to show the visitor any tangible evidence of the railways existence.

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The Historical Dictionary Railways in the British Isles

By David Wragg

The Historical Dictionary Railways in the British IslesDescription:

Railways played a key role in Britain's social, economic and industrial history. These companies have long gone, but all over the country relics remain to remind us of that pioneering age. David Wragg's Historical Dictionary of Railways in the British Isles is a comprehensive, single-volume reference guide to the old railway companies and their heritage. He provides brief histories of the companies and their many-sided activities, and he gives biographies of the men who created the rail network. He covers what is now the Irish Republic and Northern Ireland as well as the Channel Islands and the Isle of Man. His book is essential reading and reference for enthusiasts of every region and period of railway history.

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The History of The Channel Tunnel

By Nicholas Faith

The History of The Channel TunnelDescription:

The Channel Tunnel has been one of history's most protracted, and at times acrimonious, construction projects.

From the paranoia of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, when there was a fear that foreign hordes would rush through the tunnel and invade Britain, to the lethargic attempts in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, it's a miracle that this great feat of engineering was ever constructed at all.

Nicholas Faith, has delved into the archives and researched the fascinating truth about this project, that took so long to authorise and construct.

The author has found material in the archives, both in Britain and abroad, that has not been previously published or seen, outside a closed group of people.

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The Hixon Railway Disaster

By Richard Westwood

The Hixon Railway DisasterDescription:

This is the shocking true story behind the botched introduction of Automatic Half-Barrier level-crossings into Britain.

January 1968 saw the convening of the first Parliamentary Court of Inquiry into a railway accident in Britain since the Tay Bridge Disaster nearly a century before. Why was this? Because Britain's 'Railway Detectives', the Railway Inspectorate, who would normally investigate all aspects of railway safety, were also in charge of the introduction of automatic Continental-style, level-crossings into this country. At Hixon in Staffordshire, one of these newly installed 'robot' crossings on British Rail's flagship Euston to Glasgow mainline, was the scene of a fatal high-speed collision between a packed express train and an enormous, heavily laden low-loader. For once, the 'Railway Detectives' were the ones having to explain their actions, in the full glare of media attention, to an expectant and increasingly worried nation. (There was another awful, fatal collision at an automatic crossing at Beckingham, Lincolnshire, in April of 1968).

Using previously undisclosed information, the author has been able to cast fresh light on to not only the Hixon Disaster, but also the extraordinary story of the largely successful attempts, by British Railways and the Railway Inspectorate of the time, to hide the truth of just how close we came to having dozens of 'Hixons' right across the rail network.

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The L.B.S.C.R. Brighton Atlantics

By James S Baldwin

The L.B.S.C.R. Brighton AtlanticsDescription:

The Brighton Atlantic locomotives were some of the most handsome machines ever constructed at Brighton Works. They were signed by the D. Earl Marsh, Locomotive Superintendent of the London Brighton and South Coast Railway, and produced as two classes, the H1, introduced in 1905-1906, and the H2, introduced in 1911–1912.

The Brighton Atlantic type has had a following among enthusiasts and model engineers for over a century, with many fine examples of models of these machines being constructed in all scales, both as live steam and electric powered.

Great interest is still there today, with many models of these fine locomotives on show at model engineering exhibitions and on smaller scale Brighton or Southern layouts.

The Bluebell Railway in East Sussex is currently constructing a full-size replica of the last H2 Atlantic (Beachy Head) in a workshop at Sheffield Park, using some parts from the original locomotive and a rescued Great Northern Atlantic boiler.

The project to construct a replica machine has aroused a great deal of public interest in this design of locomotive. At this time there are no books available on the market for anyone who would like to construct a model on, or take an interest in, the replica project on the Bluebell Railway.

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The Leicester Gap

By Michael Vanns

The Leicester GapDescription:

Until 1987, there was still a busy stretch of British main line railway where traditional Victorian operating practices were used to control the movements of both express passenger and a variety of freight trains.

At the heart of the former Midland Railway main line from St Pancras to Sheffield, the 45-mile section between Irchester in Northamptonshire and Loughborough in Nottinghamshire was equipped with semaphore signals worked from twenty-three mechanical signalboxes. It was the last main line in the country where this once-standard arrangement remained virtually unchanged since the days of steam. This pocket of mechanical signalling was christened The Leicester Gap, because Leicester was to be the site of a new power signalbox, the last in a chain of just five that would control the whole of the Midland Main Line into the twenty-first century.

From 1984 when resignalling work started, to 1987 when it was completed, the author photographed as many trains passing through the Leicester Gap as he could. This book is the result of those efforts.

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The Light Railways of Britain and Ireland

By Anthony Burton, John Scott-Morgan

The Light Railways of Britain and IrelandDescription:

First published in 1985 by Moorland Press, The Light Railways of Britain & Ireland has remained unavailable for more than twenty-five years, until now. Re-released by Pen & Sword, this is a thorough and engaging book that covers, in depth, the fascinating story of Britain's last railway development, the Rural light railways, constructed as a result of the Light Railways Act 1896.

Rigorously detailed, it charts the overall history of the last great railway boom in Britain – the light railway boom – from 1896, to the beginning of the Great War in 1914. During this period a large number of narrow and standard gauge lines were constructed in both Britain and Ireland, in order to serve and open up areas in both countries that, at the time, lacked adequate transport links. This book tells the story of how these lines were constructed and why, in most cases, they eventually failed, due to post-First World War road competition.

Authored by two highly acclaimed writers of transport history, this is a true testament to, and a timely reminder of, Britain's last railway development.

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