Trains And Railways - Vintage Airfix


Trains and Railways books

All these titles are available to purchase from Pen and Sword.

Contents:
- Scottish Steam - A Celebration - By Keith Langston..
- Seventy Years of Railway Photography - By Colin Boocock..
- Southern Electrics - By Roger Palmer..
- Southern Maunsell 4-4-0 Classes (L, D1, E1, L1 and V) - By David Maidment..
- Southern Railway Gallery - By John Scott-Morgan..
- Southern Railway, Maunsell Moguls and Tank Locomotive Classes - By David Maidment..
- Southern Region Electro Diesel Locomotives and Units - By David Cable..
- Southern Steam: January - July 1967 - By Alan Goodwin..
- Stanier - By Keith Langston..
- Steam at Work - By Fred Kerr..
- Steam in Scotland - By Kevin McCormack..
- Steam in the East Midlands and Lincolnshire - By Roderick Fowkes..
- Steam in the North West - By Fred Kerr..
- Steam on the Southern and Western - By David Knapman..
- Steam Traction on the Road - By Anthony Burton..

 


 

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Scottish Steam - A Celebration

By Keith Langston

Scottish Steam - A CelebrationDescription:

Scotland is renowned worldwide for its engineering prowess, which of course included locomotive building. This lavishly illustrated and detailed publication celebrates standard gauge steam locomotive building North of the Border. Focussing not only on the achievements of the major companies, North British Locomotive Co Ltd, Neilson & Co Ltd, Neilson Reid & Co Ltd, William Bearmore Ltd, Sharp Stewart & Co Ltd,and Andrew Barclay, Sons & Co Ltd it also highlights the contribution made by several of the smaller, but nevertheless significant locomotive builders. Details of the output of the several railway company locomotive building works are also included. All of the Scottish built locomotive classes which came into British Railway's ownership are featured ,and a large majority of the carefully selected images are published for the first time. Scottish Steam celebrates the significant contribution made by Scottish railway engineering workshops to steam locomotive development.

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Seventy Years of Railway Photography

By Colin Boocock

Seventy Years of Railway PhotographyDescription:

Colin Boococks' railway photographs are already familiar as they have been featured in a variety of railway books and magazines. This book shows around 300 of his favourite images that illustrate the many different aspects of railway photography.

The key seven chapters in this book each cover one decade from the 1940s up to the present day. Not only do they display the early improvement in his photography as he gained experience, they also bring into focus how much railways have changed over the last seventy years. Grimy steam locomotives in smoky surroundings persisted in ever-reducing pockets as more modern forms of traction spread across our railways. Working steam finally disappeared from UK main lines in 1968 and around coal mines in the mid-1980s.

The later chapters benefit greatly from Colins' world-wide travels, in which he searched for more unfamiliar railways. The growth of heritage railways also features.

Useful appendices add insights into Colins' experience of camera technologies and photographic techniques. These emphasise the changes that have faced him as his photography has moved from black-and-white to colour, and from films and darkrooms to the computer and the digital age. Colin last used film in early 2004, having embraced digital photography with enthusiasm.

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Southern Electrics

By Roger Palmer

Southern ElectricsDescription:

The Southern Electric system was a self contained, roughly triangular area of lines with its apex in London and its base running along the south coast from Kent to Weymouth. It also made a couple of forays into Middlesex. Here, in some 196 previously unpublished colour photographs, is shown not only the variety of unit types that were around during the first twenty years since railway privatisation, but also the fact that on some services, Southern Electric types have penetrated the Home Counties whilst others have migrated to join their ranks.

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Southern Maunsell 4-4-0 Classes (L, D1, E1, L1 and V)

By David Maidment

Southern Maunsell 4-4-0 Classes (L, D1, E1, L1 and V)Description:

This book is one of the Pen & Sword Locomotive Portfolio series and covers the rebuilding by Richard Maunsell of the South Eastern & Chatham Railway ‘D’ and ‘E’ 4-4-0s as ‘D1’ and ‘E1’ locomotives with higher pressure boilers and long-travel valve events following the Churchward principles. The book also covers the SE&CR ‘L’ class designed by Maunsell’s predecessor, Harry Wainwright, with modifications made by Maunsell just before their delivery in 1914. Maunsell then designed a further 2 cylinder 4-4-0, the ‘L1’ for the Victoria – Folkestone 80-minute expresses of the mid-1920s and finally the 3-cylinder ‘V’ (the ‘Schools’ class), his masterpiece, for express services on all three constituent parts of the Southern Railway.

Design, construction, operations and performance of these locomotives are described and profusely illustrated with over 300 black & white and colour photos from their construction right through to their final demise in 1962, together with an update on the three ‘Schools’ that have been preserved and operate on Britain’s heritage steam railways.

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By John Scott-Morgan

Southern Railway GalleryDescription:

Southern Railway Gallery is the first volume in a new series of picture books, designed to be of interest to railway historians and modellers. The series subjects are themed to include an interesting mixture of useful historic illustrations, depicting locomotives, rolling stock and infrastructure.

Southern Railway Gallery covers the history of the Southern Railway from its beginings in 1923, to nationalisation in 1948, covering most aspects of its fascinating history and operations. The book looks at aspects of the Southern from the early years in the early 1920s, when the company had old worn-out stock on many of its lines, through to the introduction of new modern rolling stock and the electrification of much of its network in Kent, Sussex, Surrey and parts of Hampshire.

The company operated an extensive rail and bus network on the Isle of Wight, which covered the whole island and is well remembered to this day.

Although the Southern introduced a number of modern new steam classes, its main goal was to electrify as much of the network as possible, however this did not preclude the company from introducing two classes of successful Pacific type locomotives in the 1940s.

The company owned and operated docks and harbours throughout its existence, having an extensive fleet of ferries and cargo vessels, some of which served with the Royal Navy in the Second World War as hospital ships. The Southern, also operated bus and road services, which covered many areas not served by a local railway station on the system.

The Southern Railway ceased to exist at midnight on 31 December 1947, after a remarkable existence of twenty-four years.

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Southern Railway, Maunsell Moguls and Tank Locomotive Classes

By David Maidment

Southern Railway, Maunsell Moguls and Tank Locomotive ClassesDescription:

Southern Maunsell Moguls and Tank Engines is a volume in the series of Locomotive Profiles being published by Pen & Sword. It describes the conception, design and construction of the two- and three-cylinder 2-6-0s initially the ‘Ns’ constructed at the end of the First World War, many at government initiative by the Woolwich Arsenal and their three-cylinder variants, the ‘N1s’. It also describes in similar fashion the class ‘K’ River 2-6-4 tank engines, their riding problems and the decision to convert them as class ‘U’ two-cylinder moguls after the disastrous Sevenoaks derailment in 1927. The solitary ‘K1’ three-cylinder 2-6-4T was similarly converted as the prototype three-cylinder ‘U1’ with new build ‘Us’ and ‘U1s’ following in the early 1930s.

The moguls, originally built by Richard Maunsell for the South Eastern & Chatham Railway, became the standard mixed traffic locomotives throughout the Southern Railway for virtually the whole of its existence and many remained until near the end of BR Southern Region’s steam stock in 1965/6.

After the experience with the passenger 2-6-4 tank engines, Maunsell restricted his larger tank engine designs to freight work – the class ‘W’ for heavy cross-London interchange freight traffic and the ‘Z’0-8-0T for heavy shunting and banking work. Maunsell also redesigned some elderly LB&SCR E1 0-6-0Ts for branch line work in rural Devon and North Cornwall, providing a radial axle as 0-6-2T class E1/R.

The book covers the allocation, operation and performance of these classes and includes some personal reminiscences of the author who experienced the moguls at first hand. It also covers the sale of some of the Woolwich moguls to the CIE in Ireland and the conversion of a number to 2-6-4 freight tank engines for the Metropolitan Railway. The book is lavishly illustrated with over 300 black and white and thirty colour photographs.

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Southern Region Electro Diesel Locomotives and Units

By David Cable

Southern Region Electro Diesel Locomotives and UnitsDescription:

The electro-diesel locomotives and multiple units used by the Southern Region of British Railways, were unique to this region.

The locomotives of class 73 were used extensively throughout the region, in particular on Gatwick Express services, as well as on departmental and track recording trains. Their versatility in being able to work off 3rd rail electricity as well as diesel engined power gave them unrivalled areas of work.

The class 74s, which only had a short life, were seen particularly on boat trains and parcels services on the South Western main line.

The classes 201-3 were 6-car units of narrow bodied construction, so as to be able to work Hastings line services with its restricted clearances.

The other classes 204-207 were 3-car units employed on stopping services throughout the region, but especially in Hampshire and the lines to Uckfield and originally East Grinstead. They were also seen on services in East Sussex and Kent.

This volume shows all the classes at work, in a variety of colour schemes and locations, and has been compiled by David Cable, well known author of a range of books regarding Modern Traction, published by Pen and Sword Books Ltd.

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Southern Steam: January - July 1967

By Alan Goodwin

Southern Steam: January - July 1967Description:

At the beginning of 1967 the writing was clearly on the wall for Southern Steam, with the intention of eliminating it altogether on the 18th June of that year. From the 2nd January, with the Brush type 4s working many main line trains including the “Bournemouth Belle”, steam was reduced to thirteen departures from Waterloo, three of which were in the early hours.

From the 3rd April this was further reduced to just five day and three night time departures. However, by this time it was realised that due to late delivery of the new electric stock, the deadline for the demise of steam was put back to the 9th July and an interim timetable introduced from 12th June.

Using information gathered from many sources, “Southern Steam: January – July 1967” chronicles the events of 1967, with the final five weeks in detail, including events that formed the background to the time.

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Stanier

By Keith Langston

StanierDescription:

It is possible that in the history of British steam locomotives no class of engine was ever more universally popular than the Stanier ‘5MT’ 4-6-0 class, which were generally referred to as ‘Black Fives’. This informative book includes numerous images of the class at work, many of which are published for the first time.

Introduced by the London Midland & Scottish Railway (LMS) in 1934 the building of the 842-strong class was shared between the locomotive works at Crewe, Horwich and Derby and also by the private builders Armstrong Whitworth Ltd. and Vulcan Foundry Ltd. With the exception of a pause in production during the war time years ‘Black Five’ locomotives continued to be built until May 1951, when the last example was out-shopped from BR Horwich Works. Only four examples of the class were named, but a fifth locomotive was allocated a name which it reportedly never carried.

They were often referred to as the finest mixed-traffic locomotives ever to run in Britain. William Arthur Stanier joined the LMS in 1932 having previously served the Great Western Railway (GWR) at Swindon Works, doubtless his LMS 2-cylinder tapered boiler ‘Class 5’ 4-6-0 design reflected his Swindon experiences.

This highly efficient and reliable general-purpose design (in several variants) could generally be seen at work over all of the former LMS network, from Thurso in the north of Scotland to Bournemouth (Somerset & Dorset Joint Railway) in the south of England. They became the ultimate go everywhere steam locomotives, working all manner of trains from slow goods to express passenger services.

In 1967 just prior to the end of steam, British Railways remarkably listed 151 Stanier ‘Black Fives’ as ‘serviceable’ locomotives. A total of 18 Stanier ‘Black Five’ locomotives survived into preservation, with the majority of those having been returned to steam.

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Steam at Work

By Fred Kerr

Steam at WorkDescription:

The author, Fred Kerr, was introduced to the world of industrial railways in 1956 when his parents moved from Edinburgh to Corby in Northamptonshire, where the local steelworks offered a mix of locomotives from several manufacturers. When steam traction finished on BR in August 1968, Fred's interest in railways continued with diesel and electric traction, whilst retaining a passing interest in industrial locomotives through his visits to the heritage lines which were initiated in the post-Beeching era.

When the author converted to digital photography in 2001, he visited many heritage lines as he sought to gain experience in the digital world. When he looked back after a decade of digital photography, he noted that industrial locomotives were still at work on many heritage lines throughout the UK. He also noted that during the 1960s the effort to preserve main-line steam traction had overlooked the availability of industrial locomotives, leading to the scrapping of many locomotives with both a story to tell and an incomplete working life.

The result is a book that pays tribute to industrial locomotives which are still at work by detailing the manufacturers of these work-horses and the locomotives which they built; identifying their working lives where possible; showing their entry into preservation and paying tribute to those heritage lines which appreciated the value of these unsung heroes of the Industrial Revolution by buying the 'scrap' locomotives then restoring them to working order.

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Steam in Scotland

By Kevin McCormack

Steam in ScotlandDescription:

Kevin McCormack has written a large number of transport books mainly using previously unpublished material, much of it sourced from the Online Transport Archive. This, his latest colour album, covers the railways of Scotland in steam days and concentrates as much as possible on depicting older types of locomotives. Consequently, this volume contains a large amount of rare 1950s colour images, often depicting areas of the Scottish railway system that were later closed or cut back during the Beeching era. The pictures in this book, were taken by enthusiasts who had the good fortune to be able to afford colour film, at a time when such luxuries, were very expensive, to the average enthusiast. All the photographers concerned, travelled far and wide in Scotland with their cameras, at a time, just before most of the lines closed, between 1953-1967. The result of all this effort, is a fine collection of very rare images, depicting a lost period of railway operation, in a beautiful and picturesque part of Britain.

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Steam in the East Midlands and Lincolnshire

By Roderick Fowkes

Steam in the East Midlands and LincolnshireDescription:

The photographs in this volume of Steam in the East Midlands and Lincolnshire cover an area beginning at Derby Headquarters of the Midland following the Midland line to Nottingham and its environs, pausing at locations en-route.

Trent, in the south-east corner of Derbyshire, was a station without a town, its position and importance as an interchange junction for five main railway routes, through the plethora of junctions, served London, Birmingham, Derby, Chesterfield and Nottingham. Remarkably enough, trains could depart from opposite platforms, in opposite directions but to the same destination. There was also the constant procession of coal trains off the Erewash Valley line from the nearby Toton marshalling yard.

Also featured is the Derby Friargate to Nottingham Victoria, the Great Northern Railway line, and the former Great Central route, along with scenes at Saxby where the Midland and Great Northern Joint Railway, mainly single track line diverged, running via Bourne to East Coast resorts. Finally, there are scenes at Grantham, where changing engines in 1954 was the order of the day. Locomotives are photographed at work, at rest and awaiting a call for scrap.

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Steam in the North West

By Fred Kerr

Steam in the North WestDescription:

When BR ran its “15 guinea Special” in August 1968 many believed that steam locomotives would quickly become a “thing of the past” and that future workings would be restricted to the heritage lines which had begun to appear. Initially that seemed to be the case with the only exception being the famed A3 Class Pacific 4-6-2 ‘Flying Scotsman’ whose owner had signed a contract with BR that allowed the locomotive to operate beyond that date.

Change came in 1971 when BR trialled the operation of ‘King’ Class 4-6-0 6000 ‘King George V’, then based at Bulmer’s Hereford site, on a tour of the UK which confirmed the value of steam operation as a valuable aspect of publicity which the railways of the day desperately needed. Many locomotives operating on preserved lines had been bought with the hope of being able to operate on the main line at some future date and their owners began to use this success as a lever to further ease the restriction on steam locomotive usage on the national network.

Over time BR identified routes where steam traction could be operated and the centres where steam locomotives could be based as part of the new ethos. It was fitting that, as the last bastion of steam operation in 1968, the North West of England still retained its affection for steam locomotives with Carnforth locomotive depot still available as a maintenance centre. The status of steam operation was fully realised in the 1993 Railway Bill which not only privatised the network but also enshrined the right of steam locomotives to operate on the main line subject to meeting the normal operating standards that were applied to all locomotive operations.

The North West of England quickly proved to be the area which offered the best of operations with the stiff gradients of Shap on the West Coast Main Line and the “Long Drag” of Ais Gill on the Settle and Carlisle route providing a challenge to the footplate crews, an experience for the passengers and a sight to see from the lineside.

The lineside view has been captured by the author who lives within the area at Southport hence has been well placed to record many of these workings within the area and the wide variety of locomotive types whose owners have finally achieved the ambition of their locomotives joining the unique club of ‘Steam Locomotives Working in the North West’.

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Steam on the Southern and Western

By David Knapman

Steam on the Southern and WesternDescription:

Steam on the Southern and Western is a personal record of railway views that were captured on black and white film in the late 1950s and 1960s, until the demise of steam on British Railways.

The style of the book is the well-tried and- tested picture and captions format, and the majority of the pictures are black and white photography. Not every picture portrays a train as there are interesting branch line and infrastructure scenes to view as well. Furthermore, the book is intended to represent an eclectic mix of subjects and not to solely show main line scenes, for example.

The book covers the Southern and Western regions of British Railways, with the Somerset and Dorset Railway included for good measure, as it fits neatly into the areas of the country for this volume. It also carries its share of photographs of British Railways standard locomotives in the locations appropriate to the regions. Where preservation starts to overlap with the still-active steam scene, some historic photographs are included.

Photographs are grouped together by a particular location, for example, the Redhill to Reading line of the Southern, and Oxford on the Western. Each of these topic areas provides a flavour of the railway activity at the time. Overall, the book presents the reader with a gentle meander through the 1950's and 1960's railway scene and will stir the memories that so many of us have seen and still treasure today.

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Steam Traction on the Road

By Anthony Burton

Steam Traction on the RoadDescription:

This is the story of how for more than a hundred years steam power played a vital role in the development of road transport. It all began with tentative attempts to build steam carriages by pioneers such as Cugnot in France and Trevithick in Britain, and in the early part of the nineteenth century there were significant attempts to develop steam carriages and omnibuses. That these attempts ultimately failed was largely due to opposition by road authorities and draconian legislation. Steam power did, however, find a real purpose in agriculture, where the traction engine was used for a variety of tasks from towing and working threshing machines, to ploughing. Once the value of the traction engine had been established, it soon found a use in many parts of the world for heavy haulage work and appeared in an exotic guise as the showman's engine. The latter was not only used to haul rides to fairgrounds but also powered a dynamo that could light up the fair at night. By the end of the nineteenth century, steam on the road took on a new life with the development of steam cars and trucks. For a time they vied the new internal combustion engine for supremacy on the road. The American Doble Company even developed a 100mph steam sports car. Ultimately steam lost the war, but steam vehicles survive and delight us still thanks to enthusiastic owners and restorers.

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