Trains And Railways - Vintage Airfix


Trains and Railways books

All these titles are available to purchase from Pen and Sword.

Contents:
- Rails Across Australia - By David Cable..
- Rails Across Britain - By David Cable..
- Rails Across Europe - Eastern and Southern Europe - By David Cable..
- Rails Across Europe - Northern and Western Europe - By David Cable..
- Rails Through Barnsley - By Alan Whitehouse..
- Railway Developments around Leeds and Bradford since 1968 - By Dave Peel..
- Railway Empire - By Anthony Burton..
- Railway Guns - By John Goodwin..
- Railway Memories: Barnsley and Beyond - By Peter Hadfield..
- Railway Renaissance - By Gareth David..
- Railways and Industry in the Tondu Valleys - By Stuart Davies, John Hodge..
- Railways and Industry in the Western Valley - By John Hodge..
- Railways and Industry in the Western Valley - By John Hodge..
- Railways in the Landscape - By Gordon Biddle..
- Rebuilding The Welsh Highland Railway - By Peter Johnson..

 


 

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Rails Across Australia

By David Cable

Rails Across AustraliaDescription:

Rails Across Australia is an album of photographs taken by David Cable, a well-regarded British author of several albums of train pictures throughout the world. 

The photos were taken initially during the period between 1967 and 1973 when David lived in Adelaide, and then during several visits around the Commonwealth during the twenty-first century.

The photos cover a wide variety of trains in the mainland states, from Queensland to the Pilbara region of Western Australia, and include pictures showing trains in the landscapes, as well as close-up photos of locomotives for the modelling enthusiasts. 

The well-known problems of different gauges originally established in the various states are illustrated by the individual classes designed for them, in addition to the newest designs for the standard gauge tracks now linking them.

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Rails Across Britain

By David Cable

Rails Across BritainDescription:

Rails Across Britain is a collection of full-size colour photographs of trains that have operated in Great Britain over the last thirty years. Compiled by a well-regarded author of several successfully published books showing many varying classes of trains throughout the world, this book covers the period from 1986 to the present day. 

It brilliantly illustrates the various classes and the huge myriad of colour schemes that have been used throughout the years, from the great days of the British Rail to the era of Privatisation. The contrast between the cash-strapped British Rail from an almost universal blue and grey colour scheme, to the well-funded privatised multi-coloured system seen today, is well portrayed in this comprehensive album, in which more than one photo of a class is shown.

This selection of photographs have been specifically chosen to demonstrate an undeniably wide range of locations from Fort William in Scotland to St Austell in Cornwall, and, of course, in a variety of British weather conditions. The emphasis is, therefore, on the beauty of the train in its surroundings.

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Rails Across Europe - Eastern and Southern Europe

By David Cable

Rails Across Europe - Eastern and Southern EuropeDescription:

The two volumes covering Rails Across Europe are divided into one covering the North and West of the continent, the other dealing with the South and East.

The photos were taken by David Cable, well-regarded author of several photographic albums of trains throughout the world, supplemented by a few taken by friends.

The books show pictures of modern traction mainly from the 1980s up to the current era, showing the huge variety of classes – locomotives as well as multiple units – and the panoply of colour schemes that continue to grow.

The photos were taken both at railway stations and in the countryside and give a wide range of locations.

The first volume covers Scandinavia, the Baltic states, Germany, Poland, the Benelux countries, the United Kingdom and Ireland.

The second volume deals with France, Spain, Portugal, Italy, Switzerland, Austria and the majority of Central European and Balkan countries, which had been in the former Soviet Eastern Block.

Vintage Airfix Review:

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Rails Across Europe - Northern and Western Europe

By David Cable

Rails Across Europe - Northern and Western EuropeDescription:

The two volumes covering Rails Across Europe are divided into one, covering the North and West of the continent, the other dealing with the South and East.

The photos were taken by David Cable, a well-regarded author of several photographic albums of trains throughout the world, supplemented by a few taken by friends.

The books show pictures of modern traction mainly from the 1980s to the current era, covering the huge variety of classes – locomotives as well as multiple units – and the panoply of colour schemes that continue to grow.

The photos were taken both at railway stations and in the countryside and give a wide range of locations. The first volume covers Scandinavia, the Baltic states, Germany, Poland, the Benelux countries, the United Kingdom and Ireland.

The second volume deals with France, Spain, Portugal, Italy, Switzerland, Austria and the majority of Central European and Balkan countries, which had been in the former Soviet Eastern Block.

Vintage Airfix Review:

No review currently available.

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Rails Through Barnsley

By Alan Whitehouse

Rails Through BarnsleyDescription:

Few people realise it, but Barnsley was once the centre of a railway universe. In Victorian times, dozens of competing companies put forward schemes to build railways across, through and around the town. Between them they constructed what some still regard as the most dense railway network in the country more complicated even than Londons commuter system or even the railway networks of our major cities. The reason almost no one knows about it is because many of the lines built never saw a passenger service. They were built for one reason: coal. A maze of semi-unknown branches served every colliery in the district and the network became so overloaded with coal trains that they even had to build a railway bypass around the town to prevent everything grinding to a standstill!

Down the years Barnsleys railway network became something of a backwater, ignored by many enthusiasts and photographers. So the full story of how the railways aided the towns prosperity has rarely been told. This book is an attempt to put that right by giving a relatively short but fact-packed history, looking at each of the railway companies that opened up the town and connecting it with what was going on in the outside world. It includes a collection of high quality images, many of which have not been seen before.

As the coal industry rose and fell, so did the railway system which served it, and this book will show exactly how it all happened and why.

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Railway Developments around Leeds and Bradford since 1968

By Dave Peel

Railway Developments around Leeds and Bradford since 1968Description:

1968 was a significant year for the railways; steam traction came to an end, and Parliament passed the 1968 Transport Act. The demise of steam meant more new or refurbished diesel trains, while the Transport Act introduced the concept of locally subsidised services. Both of these impacted heavily on the Leeds/Bradford area, especially when the West Yorkshire Passenger Transport Executive began to financially support local 'Metro' lines from 1976 onwards.

The first major developments were at Bradford, where the two main terminal stations were demolished and replaced by smaller versions; Exchange in 1972 and Forster Square in 1990. In Leeds, the old Central station had closed in 1967, its trains being diverted into City station newly rebuilt to accommodate these. Between 1988-95, when passenger numbers spiralled, four routes from Leeds were electrified: Skipton, llkley, Bradford (Forster Square) and Doncaster.

By the end of the 1990s, Leeds station was at capacity and was rebuilt again between 2000 and 2002, for the second time in thirty-five years! Much of this book is therefore devoted to the transformations of these major stations, as well as Shipley, the busy station that serves Leeds, Bradford, Skipton and Ilkley. Shipley remained un-modemised for many years, and the plethora of changes made here since 1968, following the growth in commuter traffic to Leeds, is also included.

Due largely to the efforts of the WYPTE, several new stations have been added to the Metro system twenty-four currently, but more are likely. With two new franchises starting in April 2016, further developments are planned, including more trains, better frequencies, faster services and more electrification!

The book is profusely illustrated with 300 of the author's colour photos, which cover the entire period 1968-2015.

Vintage Airfix Review:

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Railway Empire

By Anthony Burton

Railway EmpireDescription:

The British were at the forefront of railway development for the first fifty years of the nineteenth century.

Railway Empire tells the story of how the British gave railways to the world, not only in the empire, but also in other countries outside areas of direct influence.

It is often forgotten today that the British were responsible for the construction and management of a large proportion of the railways constructed in Africa, South America and Australasia not to mention many thousands of miles of mileage in Asia, India, Malaya, Burma, China and Japan.

This book looks at the political, economic and technical aspects of this development, which made Britain a country at the forefront of this form of transport.

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Railway Guns

By John Goodwin

Railway GunsDescription:

In the nineteenth century the War Office showed little interest in developing large heavy artillery for its land forces, preferring instead to equip its warships with the biggest guns. Private initiatives to mount a gun on a railway truck pulled by a steam engine were demonstrated before military chiefs in the Southern Counties, but not taken up. However, the development of longer-range guns, weighing up to 250 tons, to smash through the massive armies and trench systems on the Western Front in 1916, led to a rethink. The only way to move these monsters about quickly in countryside thick with mud was to mount them on specially built railway trucks towed by locomotives. 

The railway guns were to be put on little-used country lines where they could fire on beaches, road junctions and harbours. The locations and cooperation given by the independent railway companies is explained, as are the difficulties of using the same lines for war and civilian traffic. 

The First World War also saw the emergence of large training camps for railway men. When the war ended most railway guns were dismantled and lost in ordnance depots. The Army Council was uncertain about artillery needs in a future war, so training, and development stopped.

This book largely concentrates on the realities of the time, the type of gun, the locomotives, artillery targets, locations, and what it was like when firing took place. It is fully illustrated with pictures, maps and plans covering different aspects of railway guns their locomotives and equipment.

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Railway Memories: Barnsley and Beyond

By Peter Hadfield

Railway Memories: Barnsley and BeyondDescription:

A collection of memories of a bygone age of the railway system that operated around the Barnsley area and beyond. It was a time when steam was still king (the local passenger, expresses and freight traffic were worked by steam), however the advent of diesel, although not initially noticeable, was gradually taking place.rnrnTowards the end of the 1950s and throughout the 1960s, rationalisation of the railway system and mass dieselisation took place, culminating in the end of steam on British railways (with the exception of the running of the Flying Scotsman) in August 1968.rnrnMany of the previously unseen photographs in this book include those of Royston Shed's steam fleet during the last months of working, before closing to steam officially on 4 November 1967; Thompson B1s, ex-Great Central Directors and Royston 8Fs at Stairfoot; an ex-Midland engine hauling an express over Swaithe viaduct; Barnsley Court House station prior to closure in 1960 and the famous Flying Scotsman's visit to Barnsley on 21 June 1969.

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Railway Renaissance

By Gareth David

Railway RenaissanceDescription:

When a 35 mile stretch of the former Waverley route from Edinburgh to Carlisle reopened on 6 September 2015, it became the most significant reopening of any UK railway since the infamous Beeching Report ,'The re-shaping of British Railways', was published in March 1963.

In his report, Dr Riochard Beeching recommended sweeping closures of lines across the UK to improve the financial performance of British railways, which led to wholesale closures over the following decade and a reduction in the UK rail network from 18,000 miles in 1963, to some 11,000 miles a decade later.

But since that low point was reached in the early 1970s a revolution has been taking place. Passenger traffic on the railways is now at its highest level since the 1940s and from Alloa to Aberdare, as well as from Mansfield to Maesteg, closed lines have reopened and the tide of Beeching closures has been gradually rolled back. Scores of stations have been reopened and on many of the newly revived lines, passenger traffic is far exceeding the forecasts used to support their reopening.

In this comprehensive survey of new and reopened railways and stations across England, Scotland and Wales, Gareth David asks what it tells us about Dr Beechings report, looking at how lines that were earmarked for closure in that report, but escaped the axe, have fared and reviews the host of further routes, which are either set to be reopened or are the focus of reopening campaigns.

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Railways and Industry in the Tondu Valleys

By Stuart Davies, John Hodge

Railways and Industry in the Tondu ValleysDescription:

The book begins with a history of the industrial development of the Tondu Valleys, including the succession of great industrialists who led the way in the area. This is followed by a chapter on the position of the Tondu Valleys in the South Wales Coalfield with colliery and colliery company details. Railway passenger services are next covered, followed by railway coal services. Then follows a detailed account of the sole railway depot which covered all the operations in the Tondu Valleys. A location specific account then follows of Llynfi Valley detailing both railway and colliery aspects, following the line from Bridgend, through Tondu, and all locations to Cymmer Afan and on to the original terminus at Abergwynfi, then from Blaengwynfi through the Rhondda Tunnel to Treherbert. The north end of the South Wales Mineral Railway became an adjunct to the Tondu Valley with the closure of the former Rhondda & Swansea Bay line and this is also included in similar detail. The closure of the passenger service in 1970 and renaissance of a new service from Maesteg to Cardiff in 1992 concludes the account. Detailed Appendices of operating statistics completes this very comprehensive account.

The book is the fullest account ever produced of this part of the South Wales scene and is a must for anyone interested in either the railway or mining activities (or both) in this part of South Wales.

A further volume covering the Ogmore & Garw Valleys (and associated lines) and the Porthcawl branch is planned.

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Railways and Industry in the Western Valley

By John Hodge

Railways and Industry in the Western ValleyDescription:

This is the second in a new series on the South Wales Valleys by John Hodge, author of the South Wales Main Line series and North and West series, each of four volumes. The South Wales Valleys were famous for coal mining, iron and steel, tinplate works and the railways that served both industries, between them accounting for a very high percentage of employment in the area.

A detailed, widely illustrated series on the valleys such as this, is long overdue and this is the second book in the series. The first book covering the area as far as Aberbeeg and the second continuing to the heads of the Valley at Ebbw Vale and Brynmawr.

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Railways and Industry in the Western Valley

By John Hodge

Railways and Industry in the Western ValleyDescription:

This is the first in a new series on the South Wales Valleys by John Hodge, author of the South Wales Main Line series and North and West series, each of four volumes. The South Wales Valleys were famous for coal mining, iron and steel, tinplate works and the railways that served both industries, between them accounting for a very high percentage of employment in the area. 

This book relates the history of the early years of each industry and follows this through the railway steam and diesel age to the present day. The book traces the original Newport stations of Courtybella and Dock Street for the Valleys services and how this changed to High Street from 1880. Individual sections are presented on each main railway activity, accounts of each location along the route with sections on the railway layout, collieries and other industrial concerns, all illustrated by an abundant supply of photographs of the railway steam and diesel era, with accounts of the many collieries from the early years of the nineteenth century, to the end of coal mining in the Western Valley in 1989.

A detailed, widely illustrated series on the valleys such as this, is long overdue and this first book in the series. The book is divided into two parts, the first covering the area as far as Aberbeeg and the second continuing to the heads of the Valley at Ebbw Vale and Brynmawr, as well as an account of the Hall’s Road line.

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Railways in the Landscape

By Gordon Biddle

Railways in the LandscapeDescription:

The growth of railways was a major influence in transforming Britain's landscape. This book examines how they brought about physical changes to towns, the country and coast, and had a profound affect that is still visible today, especially on the shape and size of our towns and cities.

In his book, Gordon Biddle begins by examining how railway routes transformed the rural scene and their effect on the economy, followed by an appraisal of their accompanying buildings such as stations, houses, signal boxes and yards following the changes in nineteenth-century architectural taste. He goes on to look at the impact of railways built along or near the coast, and their strong influence on the growth of seaside resorts and ports. He then turns to townscape, describing in turn the physical effect on London, other large cities, smaller towns and suburban growth.

Also included are chapters on places the railways themselves created, from new towns to villages around a station or junction; the still-visible remains of abandoned railway, not only those that followed mass closures of the 1960s, but many long-standing that date back to the nineteenth century; twentieth- and twenty-first century developments that have continued to impact on the rural and urban scene; and a comparison of contemporary illustrations of an early main line in 1838 with its appearance today.

Vintage Airfix Review:

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Rebuilding The Welsh Highland Railway

By Peter Johnson

Rebuilding The Welsh Highland RailwayDescription:

THE REVIVAL AND RESTORATION of the Welsh Highland Railway is one of the greatest heritage railway achievements of the 21st Century, yet its success followed more than one hundred years of failure.

Supported by public loans, its first incarnation combined the moribund North Wales Narrow Gauge Railways, some of the abandoned works of the Portmadoc, Beddgelert & South Snowdon Railway and part of the horse-worked Croesor Tramway. Opened in 1923, it was closed in 1937 and the track was lifted in 1941.

Serious talk of revival started in the 1960s but restoration did not start until 1997, with the neighbouring Ffestiniog Railway at the helm, supported by generous donors and benefactors, the Millennium Commission, the Welsh Government and teams of enthusiastic volunteers.

Author Peter Johnson steers a course through the railway’s complicated pre-history before describing the events, including a court hearing, three public inquiries and a great deal of controversy, leading to the start of services between Caernarfon and Porthmadog in 2011. A postscript describes post-completion developments.

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