Trains And Railways - Vintage Airfix


Trains and Railways books

All these titles are available to purchase from Pen and Sword.

Contents:
- Britain's Last Mechanical Signalling - By Gareth David..
- British Railways A C Electric Locomotives - By David Cable..
- British Railways in the 1960s: London Midland Region - By Geoff M Plumb..
- British Railways in the 1960s: Southern Region - By Geoff M Plumb..
- British Railways in Transition - By Jim Blake..
- British Steam - BR Standard Locomotives - By Keith Langston..
- British Steam - Pacific Power - By Keith Langston..
- British Steam Locomotive Builders - By James W Lowe..
- British Steam Military Connections - By Keith Langston..
- British Steam Military Connections - Southern Railway, Great Western Railway and British Railways - Steam Locomotives - By Keith Langston..
- British Steam Sunset - By Jim Blake..
- British Steam: GWR Collett Castle Class - By Keith Langston..
- British Type 3 Diesel Locomotives - By David Cable..
- Cambridge Station - By Rob Shorland-Ball..
- Chadbury: A Town and Industrial Scape in '0' Gauge - By Eric Bottomley..

 


 

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Britain's Last Mechanical Signalling

By Gareth David

Britain's Last Mechanical SignallingDescription:

Mechanical signalling has been on the way out since colour signalling was introduced in the 1920s. It was originally intended to replace mechanical signalling by the millennium, however, there are still odd pockets in the system today. There is a network rail project to finally eliminate the last boxes and mechanical signals in the next few years, replacing it with a dozen railway operating centres. this book looks at the last mechanical signalling on the network.

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British Railways A C Electric Locomotives

By David Cable

British Railways A C Electric LocomotivesDescription:

The genesis of 25kv overhead electrification began in the late 1960s on the West Coast Main Line, the 1980s for the East Anglian Main Line, and the East Coast Main Line in the late 1980s. Development took place in stages culminating in fully electrified lines from London to Scotland on both East and West Coast lines, and from London to Norwich. The introduction of these lines required the construction of new motive power.

Initially five types were produced for the WCML, from which the second phase of loco design was developed, giving a higher level of reliability, as well as power output. These newer designs were applied to the Anglian services, but the ECML plans required an updated design, ostensibly for mixed traffic, but hardly ever used on anything other than express passenger services, for which their 140mph potential enabled a major recast of the timetable. The opening of the Channel Tunnel required a mixed traffic dual voltage locomotive, running on both 25kv and the Southern Region 750v third rail DC.

The locomotives are classified between 81 and 92 inclusive, and this book of photographs by David Cable covers all the classes in a variety of locations and duties.

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British Railways in the 1960s: London Midland Region

By Geoff M Plumb

British Railways in the 1960s: London Midland RegionDescription:

After the Second World War, Britain's railways were rundown and worn out, requiring massive investment and modernisation. The Big Four railway companies were nationalised from 1948, and the newly formed British Railways embarked on a programme of building new standard steam locomotives to replace older types. These started to come on stream from 1951.

This programme was superseded by the 1955 scheme to dieselise and electrify many lines and so the last loco of the Standard types was built in 1960 and the steam locomotives had been swept entirely from the BR network by 1968.

This series of books, 'The Geoff Plumb Collection', is a photographic account of those last few years of the steam locomotives, their decline and replacement during the transition years. Each book covers one of the former 'Big Four', in the form of the BR Regions they became: the Southern Railway, London Midland & Scottish Railway, Great Western Railway and London & North Eastern Railway, including some pictures of the Scottish lines of the LMS and LNER.

The books are not intended to convey a complete history of the railways but to illustrate how things were, to a certain extent, in the relatively recent past and impart some information through comprehensive captions, which give a sense of occasion often a last run of a locomotive type or over a stretch of line about to be closed down.

The photos cover large parts of the country, though it was impossible to get everywhere given the overall timetable of just a few years mainly when the author was still a schoolboy with limited time and disposable income to get around.

Pictures are of the highest quality that could be produced with the equipment then available, but they do reflect real life and real times. In simple terms, a look at a period not so long ago but now gone forever.

Vintage Airfix Review:

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British Railways in the 1960s: Southern Region

By Geoff M Plumb

British Railways in the 1960s: Southern RegionDescription:

After the Second War, Britains railways were rundown and worn out, requiring massive investment and modernisation. The Big Four railway companies were nationalised from 1948, and the newly formed British Railways embarked on a programme of building new Standard steam locomotives to replace older types. These started to come on stream from 1951.

This programme was superseded by the 1955 scheme to dieselise and electrify many lines and so the last loco of the Standard types was built in 1960 and the steam locomotives had been swept entirely from the BR network by 1968.

This series of books, 'The Geoff Plumb Collection', is a photographic account of those last few years of the steam locomotives, their decline and replacement during the transition years. Each book covers one of the former Big Four, the Southern Railway, London Midland & Scottish Railway, Great Western Railway and London & North Eastern Railway, including some pictures of the Scottish lines of the LMS and LNER.

The books are not intended to convey a complete history of the railways but to illustrate how things were, to a certain extent, in the relatively recent past and impart some information through comprehensive captions, which give a sense of occasion often a last run of a locomotive type or over a stretch of line about to be closed down.

The photos cover large parts of the country, though it was impossible to get everywhere given the overall timetable of just a few years mainly when the author was still a schoolboy with limited time and disposable income to get around.

Pictures are of the highest quality that could be produced with the equipment then available, but they do reflect real life and real times. In simple terms, a look at a period not so long ago but now gone forever.

Vintage Airfix Review:

No review currently available.

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British Railways in Transition

By Jim Blake

British Railways in TransitionDescription:

This is a book about the years following the transition from steam to diesel and electric traction on British Railways, covering a period from 1964-1997. The author Jim Blake, took a huge number of pictures during these years, covering many aspects of British railway and bus operation, both in the London area, where he lives, and also around the country. This book looks at the railway scene in decline, trying to come to terms with the post Beeching, post steam era, before a change of political will, that has seen much rail investment in recent times. The volume not only looks at locomotives and trains, but also the overall railway scene of these years of great change since the 1960s.

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British Steam - BR Standard Locomotives

By Keith Langston

British Steam - BR Standard LocomotivesDescription:

The strains of maintaining rail services during the Second World War had taken its toll on Britain’s steam locomotive fleet. On 1 January 1948, the British Transport Commission was formed, which placed all existing railway companies under the control of one government organization. This would go on to spawn British Railways.

The railway infrastructure had suffered badly during the war years and most of the steam locomotives were ‘tired’ and badly maintained. Although the management of British Railways was already planning to replace steam power with diesel and electric engines, they still took the decision to build more steam locomotives as a stop gap. Cometh the hour, cometh the man! That man was Robert Arthur Riddles; he had more than proved his worth during the war years overseeing the rapid creation of War Department locomotives. Some 999 Standard locomotives were built in twelve classes ranging from super powerful express and freight engines to suburban tank locomotives. The locomotives were mainly in good order when the order came in 1968 to end steam, with some locomotives being only eight years old.

There still exists a fleet of forty-six preserved Standards, of which seventy-five percent are still in working order around the UK's preserved railways. A further three new build Standard locomotives are proposed.

This comprehensive publication details all the BR Standards and three Austerity type engine classes associated with Riddles. The locomotive specifications are illustrated and presented in a manner that will appeal equally to enthusiasts, model makers and railway historians.

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British Steam - Pacific Power

By Keith Langston

British Steam - Pacific PowerDescription:

'Pacific', a name collectively applied to steam locomotives with a 4-6-2 wheel arrangement are perhaps the most well known of the steam classes. Responsible for the majority of steam passenger locomotives, the class includes many household names such as Flying Scotsman and the record breaking Mallard. The newly built Pacific Tornado has raised the profile of the 4-6-2 type to even greater heights.

In this highly illustrated title, respected railway historian Keith Langston tells the full story of this hugely popular class of steam locomotive, from the original concept and designs through to the lines that ran them and the famous engines that are still visited by millions either on heritage sites or in museums.

The LNER is famously associated with their streamlined Gresley A4 Pacific locomotives and that most celebrated of locomotives, Flying Scotsman. The LMS produced powerful Pacific locomotives to a Stanier design; whilst the Southern Railway constructed Bulleid air-smoothed 4-6-2 engines. The GWR, who built Britain's first Pacific type, actually entered the BR era without a 4-6-2 type on their stock list! Whilst the Pacific class are commonly associated with express passenger engines that is not the whole story, there were also Pacific Tank Engines. These engines are covered in detail here, accompanied by many rare photographs.

British Steam Pacific Power will appeal to anyone with an interest in these classic locomotives. Written in an easy to read format and containing many previously unpublished colour and black and white photographs, the book is sure to appeal to all enthusiasts and railway modellers.

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British Steam Locomotive Builders

By James W Lowe

British Steam Locomotive BuildersDescription:

From the early 1800s and for nearly 170 years, steam locomotives were built in Great Britain and Ireland, by a variety of firms, large and small. James Lowe spent many years accumulating a considerable archive of material on the History of the locomotive building industry, from its early beginnings at the dawn of railways, until the end of steam locomotive construction in the 1960s. British Steam Locomotive Builders was first published in 1975 and has not been in print for some years. 

This useful and well researched book is a must for any serious railway historian or locomotive enthusiast, 704 pages with reference to 350 builders, 541 illustrations and 47 diagrams. The material in this book has been carefully selected to cover all the leading former steam locomotive manufacturers in the British Isles.

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British Steam Military Connections

By Keith Langston

British Steam Military ConnectionsDescription:

In Great Britain there existed a practice of naming steam railway locomotives. The names chosen covered many and varied subjects, however a large number of those represented direct links with military personnel, regiments, squadrons, naval vessels, aircraft, battles and associated historic events. Memorably the Southern Railway (SR) created a Battle of Britain class of Light Pacific locomotives, which were named in recognition of Battle of Britain squadrons, airfields, aircraft and personnel. The Great Western Railway (GWR) re-named some of its express passenger Castle Class engines after Second World War aircraft. Names were displayed in varying styles on both sides of the locomotives, additionally some nameplates were adorned with ornate crests and badges. Long after the demise of mainline steam, rescued nameplates are still much sort after collectors' items, which when offered for sale command high prices. This generously illustrated publication highlights the relevant steam locomotives at work and explains the origins of the military names.

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British Steam Military Connections - Southern Railway, Great Western Railway and British Railways - Steam Locomotives

By Keith Langston

British Steam Military Connections - Southern Railway, Great Western Railway and British Railways - Steam LocomotivesDescription:

In Great Britain there existed a practice of naming steam locomotives. The names chosen covered many and varied subjects, however a large number of those represented direct links with military personnel, regiments, squadrons, naval vessels, aircraft, battles and associated historic events. For example, all but one member of the famous ‘Royal Scot’ class were named in honour of British regiments. Also the Southern Railway created a ‘Battle of Britain’ class of locomotives, which were named in recognition of Battle of Britain squadrons, airfields, aircraft and personnel. In addition, the Great Western Railway re-named some of its engines after Second World War aircraft. The tradition has continued into modern times as the newly built ‘A1’ class locomotive is named ‘Tornado’ in recognition of the jet fighter aircraft of the same name. This generously illustrated publication highlights the relevant steam locomotives and additionally examines the origin of the military names.

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British Steam Sunset

By Jim Blake

British Steam SunsetDescription:

In this new album from Pen & Sword, transport historian and photographer Jim Blake presents a selection of pictures he took around the country in British steam's final years.

British Railways withdrew their last steam engines with almost indecent haste in the mid- to late-1960s, many having seen only a few years' service before consignment to the scrapheap. Jim's pictures graphically show how not only the locomotives themselves were neglected in their final years, but also their working environment. Their motive power depots were also badly run down, particularly when slated for closure upon steam's demise.

Most of Jim's pictures of steam locomotives, taken fifty years ago, are previously unpublished. In BR steam's last two years, they were based in two distinctly different areas on the London & South Western main line, and in the industrial north. However, their decline was just as sad and depressing in both areas once proud depots such as London's Nine Elms, with broken windows and roof open to the sky, not repaired after wartime, piles of ash and clinker everywhere, were just as derelict as those in such places as Wigan or Sunderland. Many scenes herein invoke the sad, eerie atmosphere of steam's last months.

Ironically, it was London Transport who operated the last publicly-owned standard gauge steam locomotives in 1971, some three years after BR's had gone. These are included within these pages too.

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British Steam: GWR Collett Castle Class

By Keith Langston

British Steam: GWR Collett Castle ClassDescription:

The 'Castle' class 4-6-0 locomotives designed by Charles Collett and built at Swindon Works were the principal passenger locomotives of the Great Western Railway. The 4-cylinder locomotives were built in batches between 1923 and 1950, the later examples being constructed after nationalisation by British Railways. 

In total 171 engines of the class were built and they were originally to be seen at work all over the Great Western Railway network, and later working on the Western Region of British Railways. 

The highly successful class could be described as a GWR work in progress, because further development took place over almost all of the locomotives working lives. In addition to inspiring other locomotive designers the 'Castle' class engines were proved to be capable of outstanding performances, and when introduced were rightly described as being 'Britain's most powerful passenger locomotives'. Some of the 'Castles' survived in service for over 40 years, and individually clocked up just a little short of 2 million miles in traffic. 

In this book, Keith Langston provides a definitive chronological history of the iconic class together with archive photographic records of each GWR 'Castle' locomotive. Many of the 300 plus images are published for the first time. In addition background information on the origin of the names the engines carried, including details of the many name changes which took place, are also included. The extra anecdotal information adds a fascinating glimpse of social history. 

Collett CASTLE Class is a lavishly illustrated factual reference book which will delight steam railway enthusiasts in general and in particular those with a love of all things Great Western!

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British Type 3 Diesel Locomotives

By David Cable

British Type 3 Diesel LocomotivesDescription:

The Type 3 Diesel Locomotive album comprises over 200, mainly unpublished, full sized colour photographs of four classes of British engines, developed in the earlier years of the Modernisation Plan.

The Type 3 included four classes of locomotive of medium power output, which undertook a wide range of duties from Main line and local passenger services, various freight duties and departmental work. Several are still in use on the national network, and can be seen in various parts of the country

The Book has been compiled by David Cable, who has authored a range of very successful colour albums for Pen and Sword Books Ltd. The photos illustrate the many duties and colour schemes of the classes in a variety of locations and colour schemes of the classes in a variety of locations, using largely unpublished photographs from his extensive collection.

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Cambridge Station

By Rob Shorland-Ball

Cambridge StationDescription:

Why build a Railway to Cambridge? This is the first substantive illustrated book about Cambridge Station which explores the opening of the station in 1845; the four principal railway companies which all worked to and from the station in a ‘tangle of mutual inconvenience;’ the extensive goods traffic which was handled in the several goods yard around the station; and the way the Station operated from early beginnings, to what Abellio East Anglia and Network Rail offer today. Cambridge Station is renowned for having one of the longest single platforms in the UK, served by Up and Down trains. Ingenious trackwork and extensive signalling could satisfy passengers who were told at the central booking hall entrance: 'Turn left for Kings Lynn or right for London.' The book contains several pictures never before published, showing how the Eastern Counties and then the Great Eastern Railway Companies contrived Cambridge Station and the Engine Sheds, Goods Yards, Signal Boxes and extensive sidings to serve East Anglia. And it tells people stories too, because the author worked on the station in the 1950s and 1960s and knows Cambridge and East Anglia well. He is a geographer and writes with knowledge, wisdom and humour.

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Chadbury: A Town and Industrial Scape in '0' Gauge

By Eric Bottomley

Chadbury: A Town and Industrial Scape in '0' GaugeDescription:

Most people's perception of a model railway is an arrangement of track work, decorated with some buildings and a cursory backdrop rising briefly to a sloping ceiling. Not so with Chadbury. When you walk into what was a 17ft square, double garage, you enter another world. The eyes look up before they look down at a painted backdrop, which is 8ft high and painted in oils, with watercolour landscapes of the Pennine hills. A dark satanic sky rises above the 'Cliff' cotton mill, which is 7ft wide to a tower top at 40 inches high, along with with 166 windows.

As you enter, on the left you see a canal basin surrounded by factories that continue around the layout until the town of Chadbury is reached. The doorway is bridged by a girder bridge, which completes a continuous circular track. To the left lies the shed area, to the right lies the station. At a lower level to the main layout lies a street lined with terraced houses and further industrial and wharf buildings serving another canal. Creating the various buildings has been a great interest of to the author who has demonstrated how he builds and weathers them in the book. All the buildings light up, providing both a daytime and night-time look to the layout.

It is DCC operated, and the loco stock is ex-LMS and LNER in a begrimed BR livery. Notes on materials used, tips on weathering and building dimensions are all there to help, and hopefully inspire, the would-be modeller. The book includes over 100 photographs and a detailed track plan.

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