Trains And Railways - Vintage Airfix


Trains and Railways books

All these titles are available to purchase from Pen and Sword.

Contents:
- The Royal Arsenal Railways - By Mark Smithers..
- The Severn Valley Railway - By Michael Vanns..
- The Southern After Steam - By Don Benn..
- The Southwold Railway 1879 - 1929 - By David Lee, Rob Shorland-Ball, Alan Taylor..
- The Turbomotive Staniers Advanced Pacific - By Tim Hillier-Graves..
- The Twilight of Southern Steam - By Don Benn..
- The Urie and Maunsell Cylinder 4-6-0s - By David Maidment..
- The Victorian Steam Locomotive - By Kinnear Clark CE, G D Dempsey..
- The Voyager Family - By Fred Kerr..
- Today's London Underground - By Reiss O'Neill..
- Tornado - By Robin Jones..
- Tracing Your Railway Ancestors - By Di Drummond..
- Train Doctor - By Roger Senior..
- Twenty First Century Narrow Gauge - By James Waite..
- Type 5 Heavy Freight Locomotives - By David Cable..

 


 

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The Royal Arsenal Railways

By Mark Smithers

The Royal Arsenal RailwaysDescription:

Mark Smithers has written a number of definitive books and magazine features on the history of locomotive construction and the development of narrow gauge railways. This book looks at the history and development of railways at the Royal Arsenal Woolwich, which evolved from humble roots in the 1820s into three separate railway systems, serving the Gun Factory, Laboratory and Carriage Department. The three systems originally had their own fleet of locomotives and rolling stock and were constructed using three different track gauges: standard gauge, 2ft and 18in. 

The three separate factories and their railways were amalgamated to form one organization on 1 January 1891, when the Royal Arsenal Railways became an official entity. 

The Arsenal and its railways played a major role in both world wars and continued to hold an important place in gun and propellant manufacture until the late 1950s, when the complex was gradually run down. The Royal Arsenal and its railways were finally closed in 1967, when the last train of material left the site. This book covers the history of the system from its beginnings through to its demise and also details the significant remains of a once mighty network.

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The Severn Valley Railway

By Michael Vanns

The Severn Valley RailwayDescription:

Worcestershire and Shropshire are neighbours and for 101 years until 1963 it was possible to travel by train between the two county towns of Worcester and Shrewsbury. For much of the journey, passengers would have been within sight of the River Severn, and it was a company deriving its title from that river that constructed the stretch of railway between Hartlebury and Shrewsbury at the end of the 1850s. This Severn Valley Railway was taken over by the West Midland Railway before the line opened, and a little over a year and a half later it became part of the Great Western Railway (GWR). That company ran it for almost eighty-five years until all the country’s railways were nationalised in 1948. British Railways continued to run trains over the whole route for another fifteen years before abandoning the section north from Bewdley to Shrewsbury. Fortunately, a new Severn Valley Railway company was formed by railway enthusiasts and by 1984 they were running steam-hauled trains between Kidderminster and Bridgnorth, having created one of the nation’s most popular heritage attractions.

This book provides a brief history of the Severn Valley Railway from its earliest days through to the twenty-first century, providing a guide for all those who love the sight and sound of steam engines making their way through a particularly beautiful part of the Midlands landscape.

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The Southern After Steam

By Don Benn

The Southern After SteamDescription:

After the end of steam on the Southern in July 1967, the author concentrated primarily on recording the Southern scene, to start with in black and white and then from 1972 in colour. In so doing he built up a huge collection of slides for the period 1972 to 1988 concentrating on the lines close to his Kent home or in the London area but also with some images taken on the Central and Western Division main lines. The book contains more than 260 high quality colour images of second generation rolling stock set out by class of electric or diesel multiple units and locomotives, ranging from 4 SUBs and EPBs through Hastings Diesel units to Class 73 Electro-Diesels, a total of fifteen classes all told. The severe winters of 1985 and 1987 are also included and Departmental stock isn’t forgotten. Lovers of the Southern Region in the 1970s and 80s prior to the introduction of replacement stock will find much of interest in this book.

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The Southwold Railway 1879 - 1929

By David Lee, Rob Shorland-Ball, Alan Taylor

The Southwold Railway 1879 - 1929Description:

A delightful example of one of East Anglia's minor railways: A 3ft gauge railway, single track, just over 8 miles long from Halesworth (connections to London) across the heathland and marshes of East Suffolk to the seaside resort and harbour of Southwold. This book collates the research and memories of one of the last surviving passengers with maps and pictures to tell a fascinating tale of immaculate passenger service, management from a distant London office, closure at very short notice, and twenty-first century revival.

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The Turbomotive Staniers Advanced Pacific

By Tim Hillier-Graves

The Turbomotive Staniers Advanced PacificDescription:

Turbomotive was unique in Britain's railway history, and an experimental engine that proved successful but came too late to effect the direction of steam development or deflect the onset of diesel and electric locomotives. It was the brainchild of two of the most influential engineers of the twentieth century William Stanier of the LMS and Henry Guy of Metropolitan Vickers. They hoped that turbine power, which had already revolutionised ships propulsion and power stations, would do the same for the railways.

When Turbomotive appeared in 1935, she became a PR phenomenon at a time when commercial rivalry between the LMS and the LNER was reaching its height. Its launch at Euston in June was accompanied by a great fanfare and much publicity. Such was the interest in this 'revolutionary' idea that the engine would attract attention all her life.

Although producing good but not remarkable performances, she remained in service, plying her trade between London and Liverpool for longer than anyone predicted. Most expected a quick rebuild to conventional form, but the coming of war and lack of resources meant that she carried on until 1950 in turbine form.

Inevitably, change came when maintenance costs seemed likely to escalate and re-building seemed unavoidable. She re-appeared in August 1952, part Princess and part Coronation, but her new life was cut short by the disaster at Harrow in October. Although many thought her repairable, she was scrapped to make way for another 'experimental' steam engine.

This book presents the compulsive and fascinating story of this remarkable locomotive, drawn from a wide variety of sources, many previously untapped and unpublished, including memories of the designers, the crew who drove her, accountants and hard-headed business men, PR teams, the press, the passengers and many more.

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The Twilight of Southern Steam

By Don Benn

The Twilight of Southern SteamDescription:

This book is first and foremost the story of the enginemen and their steeds which brought the steam era to an end on the Southern. It is therefore primarily about locomotive performance but enlivened by stories about how that was achieved and also about the band of young men who followed the exploits of men and machines, day and night over those last two years. It includes a substantial contribution from an ex-Nine Elms fireman and many anecdotes about the enginemen. The book contains about eighty train running logs plus records of lineside observations, detailed descriptions of the work covered by the locomotives and crews from the various steam motive power depots, copies of the actual duty rosters posted at Nine Elms, together with a unique collection of about 150 black and white and colour images taken in the 1965 to 1967 period covered by this book. It is the most comprehensive story of those last few years yet produced, and it is truly ‘The Untold Story’, a fine tribute to the enginemen who performed near miracles with their doomed and run-down fleet of locomotives, in the very different world of the mid-1960's railway, unequalled anywhere else in Britain.

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The Urie and Maunsell Cylinder 4-6-0s

By David Maidment

The Urie and Maunsell Cylinder 4-6-0sDescription:

This book is one in the Pen & Sword Transport History imprint in the ‘Locomotive Portfolio’ series and covers the family of two-cylinder 4-6-0s designed and built by the Chief Mechanical Engineers of the London & South Western and Southern Railways between 1914 and 1936, which survived well into the era of British Railways.

The N15 ‘King Arthur’ class of express passenger engines were the mainstay of the Southern Railway’s passenger business between the two world wars, but both Robert Urie and Richard Maunsell built mixed traffic and freight locomotives of a similar ilk forming a ‘King Arthur’ family of locomotives for all purposes that were simple, robust and long lived. This book describes the conception, design and construction of the N15, H15 and S15 classes and the N15X rebuilds of the LB&SCR ‘Baltic Tanks’ and their operation in traffic before and after the Second World War, until the withdrawal of the last Maunsell 4-6-0 in 1965.

The book includes extensive personal recollections of the author, who both saw and travelled on hundreds of trains hauled by many of these engines in the 1950s and ‘60s, and gives a brief summary of those that have been preserved on Britain’s heritage railways. 

The book is copiously illustrated with over 200 black and white and colour illustrations.

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The Victorian Steam Locomotive

By Kinnear Clark CE, G D Dempsey

The Victorian Steam LocomotiveDescription:

First published in 1879, this book was identified as a 'lost' publication by Peter Waterman who has provided the introduction to this fascinating work.

The original manuscript was published in the year of the Tay Bridge Disaster and the Zulu War in South Africa and it looks in detail at the history and development of the steam locomotive from 1804-1879. It contains examples of famous types of machines from the past and up to the most contemporary pieces of railway locomotive technology. 

With a selection of quality drawings and engineering diagrams, as well as rare photographs from this remarkable period of industial change, The Victorian Steam Locomotive is a timely and long-overdue insight into the thinking of Victorian engineers, lovingly restored here for today's lovers of steam.

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The Voyager Family

By Fred Kerr

The Voyager FamilyDescription:

When British Railways was privatised in 1994, much interest was generated by the franchise arrangements including the new operators and the specific requirements of the franchise agreements. The West Coast Main Line (WCML) was a major operation offered as two franchises covering Inter City and Cross-Country services, and both were initially won by Virgin Trains (albeit operated by separate companies within the Virgin group).

The Inter City franchise was awarded to Virgin Trains West Coast (VTWC) and the Cross-Country franchise was awarded to Virgin Trains Cross Country (VTCC), but both franchise agreements were awarded on condition that the existing rolling stock was replaced. In the case of VTCC this meant replacing the mix of ageing locomotive-hauled train sets by a new fleet of diesel multiple unit train sets, leading to two designs being ordered in 1998 with deliveries beginning in 2001. The Class 220 ‘Voyager’ was a 4-car train set specified for VTCC’s Inter City services, whilst the Class 221 ‘Super Voyager’ was a 5-car train set with tilting mechanism for Cross Country services; the ‘Super Voyager’ order also included four 4-car train sets for operation on Euston – Holyhead services.

The new fleets quickly provided a standard fleet, but the Virgin Trains’ franchises soon became involved in political issues that affected both the running of the companies and the operation of the train sets, leading to the Cross Country franchise changing operators in 2006. At the same time, political interference in franchise agreements led to other franchisees being forced to make decisions regarding fleet renewals and train operation that led to variations to the original ‘Voyager’ designs being introduced to service.

The Voyager Family covers the earliest days of operation whilst reflecting the many changes that have taken place, both in the franchisees who have operated them and in their spheres of operation. Despite the many criticisms, the train sets continue to provide an extensive range of services, all of which are celebrated in this book.

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Today's London Underground

By Reiss O'Neill

Today's London UndergroundDescription:

The Underground network in London has always held a fascination for historians and transport enthusiasts, from the early days of the steam operated system in the 1860s. Today's London Underground covers the network as it is today, with features on the different lines across the capital and the modern day rolling stock in use, which serve London. The book covers all aspects of operation in pictures and text, with features on depots, stations, infrastructure and servicing facilities.

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Tornado

By Robin Jones

TornadoDescription:

Officially endorsed by the A1 Steam locomotive trust, Tornado is the official account of the building of Britain's first main line steam locomotive for 50 years, how it took a team of volunteers 18 years to raise more than £2-million to build it and its international headline-grabbing debut on the main line, with a royal visit thrown in for good measure.

The book looks at the history of the A1 class and the East Coast Main Line which they were built to run on, the man who designed them, Arthur H Peppercorn, the preservation movement which evolved from a handful of volunteers saving a cash-strapped steam railway in central Wales in 1949 to the point where it could build a main line express passenger locomotive, and how the dream of building Tornado came to fruition stage by stage at Darlington.

Tornado is lavishly illustrated with both archive and contemporary photographs bringing the story up to date.

Robin Jones is a widely published and highly respected journalist who specialises in heritage transportation and industrial archaeology subjects. Robin contributes news and feature material on a regular basis across a wide range of railway titles and has written many books on Britain's railway history.

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Tracing Your Railway Ancestors

By Di Drummond

Tracing Your Railway AncestorsDescription:

Di Drummond's concise and informative guide to Britain's railways will be absorbing reading for anyone who wants to learn about the history of the industry and for family history researchers who want to find out about the careers of their railway ancestors. In a clear and accessible way she guides readers through the social, technical and economic aspects of the story. She describes in vivid detail the rapid growth, maturity and long decline of the railways from the earliest days in the late-eighteenth century to privatization in the 1990s. In the process she covers the themes and issues that family historians, local historians and railway enthusiasts will need to understand in order to pursue their research.

A sequence of short, fact-filled chapters gives an all-round view of the development of the railways. In addition to tracing the birth and growth of the original railway companies, she portrays the types of work that railwaymen did and pays particular attention to the railway world in which they spent their working lives. The tasks they undertook, the special skills they had to learn, the conditions they worked in, the organization and hierarchy of the railway companies, and the make-up of railway unions - all these elements in the history of the railways are covered. She also introduces the reader to the variety of records that are available for genealogical research - staff records and registers, publications, census returns, biographies and autobiographies, and the rest of the extensive literature devoted to the railway industry.

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Train Doctor

By Roger Senior

Train DoctorDescription:

Train Doctor is the story of Roger Senior's career in the railway industry, from 1968 when the author joined British Railways, until his retirement from Great North Eastern Railway.

The book takes you from the 1970’s period, with its first generation Diesels, through to privatisation in 1994 and the electrified East Coast main line.

This will be of interest to enthusiasts and modern railway historians, with its inside look at the railway industry during a time of considerable change.

The author began his career with first generation diesel classes, on the Eastern Region, of what was then British Railways and went on to work with the High Speed Train Fleet, when they were first introduced to main line service, in the 1970s.

This is a story of troubleshooting, with many different types of modern traction over a period of twenty-five years, an insight in to the trials and tribulations of keeping the railway running, in all weathers and at all costs.

Roger Senior later worked with electric traction, both before and after privatisation, on the East Coast main line, finishing his career with Great North Eastern Railway as the Resident Engineer for the refurbishment of the MK1V fleet known as the ‘Mallard’ project.

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Twenty First Century Narrow Gauge

By James Waite

Twenty First Century Narrow GaugeDescription:

James Waite has been a skilled railway photographer for many years. In this book he has brought together photographs of many of the world’s steam-worked narrow gauge railways in the twenty-first century, concentrating mostly on views which show the scenery, both natural and man-made, through which they ran. They are accompanied by extended captions; the fruit of extensive research containing much historical information about the railways and their locos. He also offers many fascinating insights into the districts and communities which they serve, along with anecdotes about his adventures while visiting them which are often amusing and always informative.

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Type 5 Heavy Freight Locomotives

By David Cable

Type 5 Heavy Freight LocomotivesDescription:

This photographic album portrays the four classes of locomotives introduced to operate on the British Railways system, prior to Privatisation in 1994.

Increasing loads and deteriorating reliability of older classes necessitated the design of new, higher horsepower classes of diesel locomotives to operate the increasing requirement to operate trains handling loads in bulk, such as coal, minerals, fuels etc.

The four classes included one American design – the class 59 – which set new standards in haulage capacity and reliability. The other three designs – classes 56, 58 and 60 – were more suitable to their tasks than previous models, but in the case of the class 56, suffered a poor repuatation for availability for several years, although the few remaining members of the class have now attained acceptable standards.

Of the four classes, a small number of class 56s operate in private ownership, all the class 58s have been withdrawn, but all the class 59s and 60s are in daily use throughout England and Wales.

This album has been written by David Cable, author of a series of illustrated books covering railways in the UK as well as overseas. The book shows examples of all four classes working a variety of duties at a wide range of locations.

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