Crimean War - Vintage Airfix


Crimean War books

All these titles are available to purchase from Pen and Sword.

Contents:
- A Bearskin's Crimea - By Algernon Percy..
- A Cavalryman in the Crimea - By Philip Warner..
- British Battles of the Crimean Wars 1854-1856 - By John Grehan, Martin Mace..
- Conflict in the Crimea - By Donald Richards, Don Richards..
- Despatches from the Crimea - By William Russell, Introduction by Martin Bell..
- Eyewitness In the Crimea - By Michael Hargreave Mawson..

 


 

Result Pages:  1  Displaying 1 to 6 (of 6 Books)

A Bearskin's Crimea

By Algernon Percy

A Bearskin's CrimeaDescription:

Using much previously untapped source material A Bearskin's Crimea is a blow-by-blow account of the Grenadier Guards' experiences in the Crimean War. The principal character, The Honourable Henry Percy, a member of the distiguished and powerful Northumberland family (known as 'The Kings of the North'), was present at all the major battles of that appalling conflict: The Alma, Balaklava, Inkerman and the Seige of Sebastopol. Percy was no ordinary soldier: not only was he a shrewd observer with a skilled pen but a thoroughly capable and courageous officer. This is borne out by his winning the Victoria Cross and his rapid promotion.

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A Cavalryman in the Crimea

By Philip Warner

A Cavalryman in the CrimeaDescription:

Among the British troops bound for the Black Sea in May 1854 was a young officer in the 5th Dragoon Guards, Richard Temple Godman, who sent home throughout the entire Crimea campaign many detailed letters to his family at Park Hatch in Surrey. Temple Godman went out at the start of the war, took part in the successful Charge of the Heavy Brigade at Balaklava and in other engagements, and did not return to England until June 1856, after peace had been declared. He took three very individual horses and despite all his adventures brought them back unscathed.

Godman’s dispatches from the fields of war reveal his wide interests and varied experiences; they range from the pleasures of riding in a foreign landscape, smoking Turkish tobacco, and overcoming boredom by donning comic dress and hunting wild dogs, to the pain of seeing friends and horses die from battle, disease, deprivation and lack of medicines.

He writes scathingly about the skein of rivalries between the Generals (‘a good many muffs among the chiefs’), inaccurate and ‘highly coloured’ newspaper reports and, while critical of medical inefficiency, regards women in hospitals as ‘a sort of fanaticism’. Yet at other times he will employ the pen of an artist in describing a scene, or wax eloquent on the idiosyncrasies of horses. He is altogether a most gallant and sensitive young cavalryman, and deservedly went on to achieve high rank after the war. Always fresh and easy to read, his letters provide an unrivalled picture of what it was really like to be in the Crimea.

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British Battles of the Crimean Wars 1854-1856

By John Grehan, Martin Mace

British Battles of the Crimean Wars 1854-1856Description:

The Crimean War was the most destructive armed conflict of the Victorian era. It is remembered for the unreasoning courage of the Charge of the Light Brigade, for the precise volleys of the Thin Red Line and the impossible assaults upon Sevastopol's Redan. It also demonstrated the inefficiency and ineffectiveness of the British military system based on privilege and purchase.

Poor organisation at staff level and weak leadership from the Commander-in-Chief with a lack of appreciation of the conditions the troops would experience in the Crimea resulted in the needless death of thousands of soldiers. The Royal Navy, by comparison, was highly effective and successfully undertook its operations in the Baltic, the Black Sea and the Sea of Azov.

The relative performance of the two branches of Britain's armed forces is reflected in the despatches sent back to the UK by the respective commanders. The comparative wealth of detail provided by Admirals Napier, Dundas and Lyons contrast sharply with the limited, though frequent, communications from Generals Raglan, Codrington and Simpson.

The despatches of all these commanding officers are presented in this compilation just as they were when first published in the 1850s. They tell of the great battles of the Alma, Balaklava and Inkerman, of the continuing struggle against Sevastopol and the naval operations which cut the Russian communications and ensured an eventual, if costly, victory. They can be read, just as they were when revealed to the general public more than 150 years ago.

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Conflict in the Crimea

By Donald Richards, Don Richards

Conflict in the CrimeaDescription:

The author relies to a great extent on contemporary accounts of a large number of British men - and women - who were unwittingly caught up in this appalling war. As well as surviving the efforts of their determined enemy, the Russians, they had to overcome the harshest weather, rampant disease and woefully inadequate administrative support. As revealed to a shocked nation by the first war reporters, medical care was largely non-existent and wounded faced the trauma of being left for days without medical attention. This was where Florence Nightingale came in. Battles were prolonged, desperate and hugely costly. The Crimean War was the catalyst for the modernisation of the Army, due to the disgraceful injustice of conditions and lack of leadership and care by many in authority.

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Despatches from the Crimea

By William Russell, Introduction by Martin Bell

Despatches from the CrimeaDescription:

William Russell's despatches to The Times revolutionised war reporting, and hence the public's perception of war. Each piece was written with a bludgeoning honesty, a refusal to compromise and with the meticulous detail of someone who cared deeply for what they were doing. From the first sailing of the expedition, to the final surrender of Sebastopol, Russell witnessed the battles of the Alma, Inkerman, Balaklava and the Tchernaya. He saw the tragic charge of the Light Brigade and the carnage at the Malakoff and the Redan. His descriptions are graphic, and still come across as extraordinarily modern. The despatches allowed the public to read about the reality of warfare, diminishing the distance between the home front and remote battlefields. Within the space of just a few months, Russell became a national figure in Britain. Shocked and outraged, the public's backlash from his reports led the Government to vastly improve soldiers' living standards and inspired Florence Nightingale to lead 38 volunteer nurses to Balaklava to improve sanitation for the wounded soldiers.

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Eyewitness In the Crimea

By Michael Hargreave Mawson

Eyewitness In the CrimeaDescription:

George Frederick 'Fred' Dallas wrote 137 letters to his family and friends while on active service in the Crimea. A company commander in the 46th Foot, his first letters reflect a soldier's enthusiasm for the 'brilliant affair' that awaits the British Army overseas. Within weeks of arriving, excitement turns to disbelief at the continual misjudgement of his leaders. Poor preparation and divided command exposed the troops to surprise attacks from 'The Russe', and to the appalling conditions of the Crimean winter. By contrast, Dallas' reports on the casual bravery of his comrades recognise the true heroes of a mismanaged campaign.

Through these letters we relive the terrible perils of combat and siege warfare: the author's almost miraculous escape from serious injury, whilst continually witnessing his comrades' slaughter; the monotony of being entrenched in Sebastopol; the 'utter confusion' surrounding instructions to attack; the mistakes at Inkermann and the Redan; the wearying cold. We also get an insight into the quieter moments in camp and the friendships forged between the men. 

Supplemented by the editor's excellent footnotes and detailed biographical index, this is a revealing and intimate history of all those involved in the Crimean War.

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