Civil Aviation - Vintage Airfix


Civil Aviation books

All these titles are available to purchase from Pen and Sword.

Contents:
- Big Wings - By Philip Kaplan..
- Fire over Heathrow - By Susan Ottaway..
- Flying From My Mind - By David G Cook..
- London's Airports - By Martin Bowman, Graham Simons..
- Olympic Airways - By Graham Simons..
- Steam in the Air - By Maurice Kelly..
- The Berlin Airlift - By John Grehan..
- The British Overseas Airways Corporation - By Graham Simons..
- The Power to Fly - By Brian H Rowe..
- The Trans-Atlantic Pioneers - By Bruce Hales-Dutton..

 


 

Result Pages:  1  Displaying 1 to 10 (of 10 Books)

Big Wings

By Philip Kaplan

Big WingsDescription:

In the history of aviation there have been many attempts to produce aircraft of extraordinary proportions to expand the limits of technology and create new performance standards. With few exceptions, the early attempts did not become the successes envisaged until post-World War II when such aircraft as the Boeing B-52 long-range heavy bomber and the Boeing 747 'Jumbo Jet' airliner changed the face of aviation in both the military and civil roles. Big Wings is a well-researched, highly informative and sometimes nostalgic look at the sixteen most significant giants of the air. Each chosen aircraft is introduced and its raison d'?tre explained, then follows an in-depth review of the successful and failed technical aspects of the design, its operational history, first-hand accounts from those that had flown the aircraft and finally some startling facts and statistics. The aircraft selected are as follows: Military - Douglas B-19, Boeing B-29, Consolidated B-36, Northrop B-49 and Boeing B-52, Airliners - Bristol Brabazon, Boeing 747 and Airbus A380, Heavy Lifters - Messerschmitt Me323, Consolidated XC-99, Lockheed C5 and Antonov AN-225, Flying Boats - Dornier Do-X, Martin JRM Mars, Hughes HK-1 and Saunders Roe Princess.

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Fire over Heathrow

By Susan Ottaway

Fire over HeathrowDescription:

One and a half minutes after take-off on the clear and sunny afternoon of 8 April 1968, the Number 2 engine of BOAC Boeing 707 G-ARWE broke away from its mounting pylon and fell, tumbling in flames. Captain Cliff Taylor managed an extremely smooth touchdown about 400 yards beyond the Heathrow runway threshold and the aircraft came to a stop 1,400 yards further along the runway. The cabin crew had the doors open and passengers began escaping from the starboard over-wing exit and then via chutes at the forward and rear galley doors. Several explosions occurred and the port wing fell off, the resulting blast hurling flaming debris over the side of the aircraft. The rear escape chute was damaged by the fire and burst but, of the 126 people aboard, most of the 121 survivors had escaped before the arrival of the main fire and rescue services. Thirty-eight people received treatment for injuries and five, including stewardess Barbara Jane Harrison, were overcome by heat and fumes and died aboard G-ARWE. For her bravery in trying to rescue the remaining passengers on that day Jane Harrison was awarded the George Cross.

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Flying From My Mind

By David G Cook

Flying From My MindDescription:

This fascinating story begins in 1973 when David Cook built a glider in an attempt to win the Selsey Birdman Rally ' an annual event where all types of creations are launched from the end of Bognor Pier. Between 1975 and 1977 he won every National and International hang gliding competition entered and then in 1977 he designed and built a power unit for his glider. In 1978 he became the first and lowest-powered microlight to cross the English Channel. His successes in this venture led to sponsorship from Duckhams Oil and there followed a period of demonstration flights at major air shows. In 1982 he designed a microlight called Shadow and in 1983 it took the FIA world speed and distance records for the class. In 1992 he took the aircraft to 23,600ft to claim the world altitude record for the class, beaten later by himself in a newly designed Streak to 27,150 ft. David started a company to build the Shadow in 1984 and has demonstrated its remarkable flying abilities around the world, during which time he had many amusing and some exciting experiences. In 1987 the Shadow won the British Design Award.

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London's Airports

By Martin Bowman, Graham Simons

London's AirportsDescription:

This book is for the passengers and aviation buffs who use London’s main airports. It includes a brief history, plans and photographs for each of the five airports, together with directions and information about gates, security, passport control, shopping, restaurants, car parks and other transport connections. Details of Air Traffic Control in London airspace is explained with the inclusion of aerial photographs taken during approach to landing so passengers may locate places of interest whilst flying.

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Olympic Airways

By Graham Simons

Olympic AirwaysDescription:

The Olympic Airways story has fascinated Graham M. Simons for many years. This new book represents the culmination of decades spent researching the history of this fascinating Greek airline. It is a story of evolution, conflict, personality and politics, all set against a backdrop of world and civil wars, coups and counter-coups.

During the course of his research, it became apparent to the author that many of the fine details pertaining to the company weren't widely known, although almost everyone had heard of the towering, controversial, leading figurehead who oversaw much of the central part of the story: Aristotle Socrates Onassis. His colourful life is threaded through this history, lending it drama and multiple levels of intrigue.

The airline's story cannot be told in isolation. Olympic did not spring fully formed into being in 1957. Its roots were set much further back in history, through a number of predecessor airlines - both national and international - who had been using the Hellenic Republic and Athina as the crossroads of the air for the Eastern Mediterranean since the dawn of aviation.

This is the story of the birth and dramatic life of an airline with a chequered, controversial and complicated history. Graham M. Simons has skilfully woven all the various threads to create a powerful and important historic record.

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Steam in the Air

By Maurice Kelly

Steam in the AirDescription:

Scientific investigation into manned flight began early in the 19th Century at a time when steam power was the only transportable propulsion generator available to the many pioneer flying-machine designers of the day. This unique history of the attempts, failures and successes to master the art of flight gathers many intriguing, fanciful and extraordinary designs from around the world. The author describes in detail how many types of steam engine were adapted for use in flight and the flying-machines into which they were fitted. This is an amazing and untold story of the men who dreamed of flying in an age when horse-power was mainly generated by the animal of the same name.

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The Berlin Airlift

By John Grehan

The Berlin AirliftDescription:

The fate of the free world hung in the balance. Stalin’s Soviet Union sought to drive the Western democracies from Germany to continue the communist advance across Europe. The first step in Stalin’s scheme was to bring Berlin under Soviet control. Berlin was situated deep inside the Soviet-occupied region of the country, but the German capital had been divided into two halves, one of which was occupied by the Soviet Union, the other, in separate sectors, by Britain, France and the USA. Stalin decided to make the Allied hold on West Berlin untenable by shutting down all the overland routes used to keep the city supplied.

The choice faced by the Allies was a stark one – let Berlin fall, or risk war with the Soviets by breaking the Soviet stranglehold. In a remarkably visionary move, the Allies decided that they could keep Berlin supplied by flying over the Soviet blockade, thus avoiding armed conflict with the USSR.

On 26 June 1948, the Berlin Airlift began. Throughout the following thirteen months, more than 266,600 flights were undertaken by the men and aircraft from the US, France, Britain and across the Commonwealth, which delivered in excess of 2,223,000 tons of food, fuel and supplies in the greatest airlift in history.

The air-bridge eventually became so effective that more supplies were delivered to Berlin than had previously been shipped overland and Stalin saw that his bid to seize control of the German capital could never succeed. At one minute after midnight on 12 May 1949, the Soviet blockade was lifted, and the Soviet advance into Western Europe was brought to a shuddering halt.

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The British Overseas Airways Corporation

By Graham Simons

The British Overseas Airways CorporationDescription:

Graham Simons presents us here with a colourful, thoroughly engrossing, well-researched and highly illustrated history of The British Overseas Airways Company, from its origin in 1940 to its closure in 1974.

The scope of the book takes in the history of the Second World War, examining the ways in which this conflict shaped the development of the airline. BOAC kept wartime Britain connected with its colonies and the allied world, often under enemy fire, and initially with desperate shortages of long-range aircraft. It played an important role in the transportation of passengers during an incredibly fraught and dangerous era. Post-war, jets were brought into the mix and aircraft types such as the de Havilland Comet saw employment.

In the 1970s, an Act of Parliament saw BOAC merged with BEA, with effect from 31 March 1974, forming today's British Airways. But the era of The British Overseas Airways Company marked an important bridge between wartime services and the contemporary operations that we recognise today as being part of British Airways' day-to-day working practices.

The era 1940-1974 saw a great deal of development change the face of flight in a variety of contexts. By choosing to record the history of BOAC, Graham M. Simons is confronting an era of ongoing interest to students of aviation and historians of mid-Twentieth century history.

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The Power to Fly

By Brian H Rowe

The Power to FlyDescription:

This is the fascinating autobiography that tells how a young English boy who endured the horrors of World War II in London went on to become the Chairman of one of the World's greatest aircraft engine manufacturers - General Electric. From his early beginnings as an apprentice at de Havilland in Elstree working on the very basic Gypsy piston engine through to the acquisition of an outstanding qualification in engineering at Durham University, this story reveals much about the conditions of work and technology of those early post-war years. What was then known as 'The Brain Drain' enticed the author into a career in the USA. He rose steadily through the ranks of GE and worked on major new advances in jet-engine technology for both military and civil applications. His career lead him to meet many of the most influential politicians, aviation icons and world leaders. As fascinating as the technology, is the politicking that went on in the 70s, 80s and 90s to secure billion dollar orders on a global scale.

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The Trans-Atlantic Pioneers

By Bruce Hales-Dutton

The Trans-Atlantic PioneersDescription:

Every day up to 3,000 aircraft fly across the Atlantic Ocean. If each one carries 250 passengers, that could mean as many as 750,000 people on the move between Europe and North America.

The main concern for most is the choice of in-flight movie or whether to have beef or chicken for dinner. A century ago it was very different. Before John Alcock and Arthur Whitten Brown’s epic flight of June 1919 no such journey had been attempted and they could not know what to expect.

Of course, it took all the guts and determination the two men could muster but there was something else. Alcock and Brown were true professionals. Both had thought very deeply about the challenges facing them and both were determined to leave nothing to chance. In the background was the £10,000 prize offered by Lord Northcliffe, whose generosity represented a potent incentive for pioneer aviators.

Inevitably, the names of Alcock and Brown have become synonymous with that first trans-Atlantic flight. They were the first but by no means the last of the trans-Atlantic pioneers. There were many others, some of whom are just as celebrated, while others have sunk into obscurity.

His Majesty’s airship R-34, for example, made the first flight from east to west and followed that up with the first return crossing. Charles Lindbergh made the first flight from the North American mainland to that of Europe. Amelia Earhart was the first woman to make a solo crossing.

In the 1930s the German Zeppelins, which only a few years earlier had been terrifying London with their bombs, were offering the first regular commercial flights. They proved popular despite their high cost and the ever-present threat of immolation – eventually realised – caused by the inflammable hydrogen used as a lifting agent.

It took the demands of war to prove that the Atlantic could be crossed regularly by heavier-than-air craft and pave the way for the post-war commercial operations that followed. In the 1950s came the first jets, followed by the first supersonic airliners.

Still the pioneering went on: the first cut-price operations and the first by the twin-engine jets that brought undreamed-of flexibility to long-distance travel and now dominate the trans-Atlantic airways.

And the pioneering on what is still the world’s busiest and most prestigious intercontinental air route will continue. Who, the book concludes by asking, will operate the first airliner featuring hybrid power, the first fully autonomous machine, the first to use other than fossil fuel?

Will the next hundred years be exciting as those truly pioneering days of the past?

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