Aviation In Ww1 - Vintage Airfix


Aviation in WWI books

All these titles are available to purchase from Pen and Sword.

Contents:
- Great War Fighter Aces 1916 - 1918 - By Norman Franks..
- Hawker VC - The First RFC Ace - By Tyrrel M Hawker MC..
- In The Footsteps of The Red Baron - By Norman Franks, Mike O'Connor..
- In the Teeth of the Wind - By Squadron Leader C P O Bartlett DSC..
- Kings of the Air - By Ian Sumner..
- Letters from an Early Bird - By Donal MacCarron..
- Lighter Than Air - By Guy Warner..
- Lionel Morris and the Red Baron - By Jill Bush..
- Lost Wings of WWI - By Martin Bowman..
- My War in the Air 1916 - By Captain Alan Bott MC..
- Pioneers of Aerial Combat - By Michael Foley..
- Political Wings - By Alun Wyburn-Powell..
- Racing Ace - By Dr Julian Lewis..
- Recollections of the Great War in the Air - By James McConnell..
- The 'Baby Killers' - By Thomas Fegan..

 


 

Result Pages: [<< Prev]   1  2  3  4  [Next >>]  Displaying 16 to 30 (of 50 Books)

Great War Fighter Aces 1916 - 1918

By Norman Franks

Great War Fighter Aces 1916 - 1918Description:

By the close of 1916, the air war over France was progressing amazingly. The Royal Flying Corps, the French Air Force and the opposing German Air Service, were all engaged in fierce aerial conflict and the Allied air forces were following a particularly successful if aggressive policy. They were taking the war to the Germans by constantly crossing the massive trench system that stretched from the North Sea to the Swiss border. With observation and bombing aircraft requiring constant protection from the German fighter Jastas, the fighter aces on both sides soon gained publicity and fame as a result of their daily engagements. 

This book explores the many ways in which fighter pilots developed tactics in order to outdo the opposition in the fight for allied victory. In so doing, they achieved high honours on account of their prowess in the skies. It also looks at the development of militarised flight during the course of these key years, revealing how each side constantly endeavoured to improve their aircraft and their gunnery.

By early 1918 the Americans were also starting to take part in the war against Germany, and any number of US citizens were joining both the French Air Service as well as manning their own Aero Squadrons. This publication covers the development of American air combat, whilst also recording the efforts of some of their ace pilots flying both British and French aircraft with precision and skill.

Vintage Airfix Review:

No review currently available.

Return to Top

 

Hawker VC - The First RFC Ace

By Tyrrel M Hawker MC

Hawker VC - The First RFC AceDescription:

By the age of 25 Lanoe Hawker of the Royal Flying Corps had won the VC and DSO. He was the first pilot to record five 'kills' before being shot down and killed by Baron von Richthofen (The Red Baron).

Lanoe's biography was written by his brother Tyrrel as a tribute. The Hawkers came from a distinguished sporting family with strong military and naval records and Lanoe from the outset set his sights on flying for the RFC. After attending the Central Flying School, he crossed to France in October 1914 with 6 Squadron equipped with BE2s and Henri Farmans.

As the war in the air progressed, Hawker shone as both a combat pilot and commander. He was rapidly promoted and given command of 24 Squadron. He, like other pilots, flew numerous early fighter aircraft such as the Bristol Scout, BE2c, FE2b and the famous DH2. Casualty/death rates were appalling but this special band of brothers flew on regardless until their turn came.

This book contains many combat reports by pilots of their actions in the air which make the most graphic reading. Of particular interest is von Richthofen's account of their fatal encounter. The relative merits, qualities and characteristics of the aircraft, both British, French and German, are discussed with pilots' opinions.

As an insight into Great War combat air operations Hawker VC – RFC Ace is unlikely to be surpassed.

Vintage Airfix Review:

No review currently available.

Return to Top

 

In The Footsteps of The Red Baron

By Norman Franks, Mike O'Connor

In The Footsteps of The Red BaronDescription:

Manfred von Richthofen became a fighter pilot on the Western Front in August 1916. By January 1917, Richthofen had shot down fifteen aircraft had been appointed commander of his own unit. He painted the fuselage of his Albatros D-III bright red and was nicknamed the Red Baron. This book is divided into three sectors of the WWI front line in which von Richthofen operated. Airfield sites, memorials and the graves of Manfred's famous victims are described with directions for the battlefield walker.

Vintage Airfix Review:

No review currently available.

Return to Top

 

In the Teeth of the Wind

By Squadron Leader C P O Bartlett DSC

In the Teeth of the WindDescription:

So rapid have been the advances in the science of aeronautics since the end of the First World War that it requires a considerable feat of imagination to cast one's mind back over the comparatively short period of seventy years to the days when Flight Commander Bartlett of the Royal Naval Air Service was flying some of the world's first bombers over the Western Front.

An equal adjustment for those more used to accounts of the nerve-chilling existence of bomber crews in the Second World War is called for when tuning in to the extra ordinarily happy-go-lucky atmosphere which seemed to prevail among these early pilots. Not for them the nail-biting tension as they head over the trenches - rather the schoolboy exuberance of a jolly outing.

Philip Bartlett's account is a unique and fascinating record of a pilot's life in the dawn of aerial warfare and, as history, of the first use of the bomber in war, strangely, by the Navy's aircraft.

Flying by day and night alone, without navigational aids, the author moves from attacks on the U-boat bases to bombing the German Gothas as they prepared to raid London, and then to the support of Haig's drive to the coast which ended in the mud of Passchendaele. The climax in March, 1918, is reached when the author's squadron finds itself directly in the path of Ludendorff's massive thrust, which broke the British Vth Army and nearly decided the War. Attacked by Richthofen's aces, No 5 Squadron RNAS flew continuous and desperate missions against the advancing troops from aerodomes which were over-run time after time. 

At a time when the life of a pilot was reckoned in weeks, the author flew 101 missions, enduring the rigours of flying without heating or oxygen, with hesitant engines, no parachutes and the attention of German fighters. Yet there is continual evidence of the pure joy of flying and wonder at the sheer beauty of the the sky.

Vintage Airfix Review:

No review currently available.

Return to Top

 

Kings of the Air

By Ian Sumner

Kings of the AirDescription:

In comparison to their British and German counterparts, the French airmen of the Great War are not well known. Yet their aerial exploits were just as remarkable, and their contribution to the war effort on the Western Front was equally important. That is why Ian Sumner's vivid history of the men of the French air force during the war is of such value. He tells their story using the words of the pioneering pilots and observers themselves, drawn from memoirs, diaries, letters, and contemporary newspapers, magazines and official documents. The recollections of the airmen give an authentic portrait of their role and their wartime careers. They cover recruitment and training, reconnaissance and artillery spotting, aerial combat, ground strafing and bombing, and squadron life. They also highlight the technical and tactical innovations made during those hectic years, as well as revealing the airmen's attitude to the enemy - and their thoughts about the ever-present threat of injury and death.

Vintage Airfix Review:

No review currently available.

Return to Top

 

Letters from an Early Bird

By Donal MacCarron

Letters from an Early BirdDescription:

This is the story of an early pioneer aviator who took to the air just a few years after the Wright Brothers proved that man was capable of controlled powered flight. Corbett Wilson (CW) was the only son of a wealthy family and was educated at Eaton from 1896 to 1899. He was commissioned into the Dorset Regiment and served in the South African War, by the end of which he had transferred to the Royal Artillery and became a Lieutenant in 1908. CW enrolled at the Bleriot Flying School at Pau in southern France and upon gaining his wings purchased a Bleriot XI aeroplane. Later he flew from Hendon Aerodrome and from there he made the first flight across the Irish Sea. When World War I loomed CW joined the military division of the newly formed Royal Flying Corps and in August 1914 he took off from Dover for France with No. 3 Squadron. It is this point that the vividly written letters sent to his mother give an enthralling insight into the developing war and the early military use of aircraft in battle. He lasted just ten months before being shot down by enemy flack on 15 May 1915.

Vintage Airfix Review:

No review currently available.

Return to Top

 

Lighter Than Air

By Guy Warner

Lighter Than AirDescription:

Neville Florian Usborne entered the Royal Navy as a cadet in 1897. In the years between him joining up and the outbreak of the First World War, he engaged in a huge number of enterprises and endeavours. Praise and respect garnered in accordance with his achievements all helped to establish his reputation in later years as an 'irreplaceable' pioneer and a leading light of early British airship design. His fertile imagination and enterprising spirit fused to form a dynamic personality, able in wartime to draw up countless schemes in an effort to outwit the enemy. 

His chief task during the Great War was to dream up new tactics and designs to combat the Zeppelin menace, perceived as one of the most damaging threats of the entire conflict. He was also deeply involved in the design of the very successful SS and Coastal Class airships; indeed, during 1915 he was actually appointed Inspector Commander of Airships at the Admiralty. Unfortunately, his illustrious career was destined to be cut short in 1916 when he was killed testing a prototype of one of his own designs. This new biography seeks to shine a light on an overlooked pioneer of early aviation and it does so in entertaining and reverential style. The importance of Usborne the pioneer is made plain; as one of his contemporaries commented upon his death “No one can talk of the early days of British airship design without mention of his name and work. A personality was lost on that February day which was irreplaceable.”

Vintage Airfix Review:

No review currently available.

Return to Top

 

Lionel Morris and the Red Baron

By Jill Bush

Lionel Morris and the Red BaronDescription:

Nineteen-year-old Lionel Morris left the infantry for the wood and wires of the Royal Flying Corps on the Western Front in 1916, joining one of the world’s first fighter units alongside the great ace Albert Ball. Learning on the job, in dangerously unpredictable machines, Morris came of age as a combat pilot on the first day of the Battle of the Somme, as the R.F.C. was winning a bloody struggle for admiralty of the air.

As summer faded to autumn, and the skies over Bapaume filled with increasing numbers of enemy aircraft, the tide turned. On 17 September 1916, Morris’s squadron was attacked by a lethally efficient German unit, including an unknown pilot called Manfred von Richthofen. As the shock waves spread from the empty hangars of No.11 Squadron all the way to the very top of the British Army, the circumstances surrounding Morris’s death marked a pivotal shift in the aerial war, and the birth of its greatest legend.

Told through previously unpublished archive material, the words of contemporaries and official records, Lionel Morris and the Red Baron traces a short but extraordinary life; and reveals how Morris’s role in history was rediscovered one hundred years after his death.

Vintage Airfix Review:

No review currently available.

Return to Top

 

Lost Wings of WWI

By Martin Bowman

Lost Wings of WWIDescription:

This new publication from eminent military historian Martin Bowman chronicles the stories of airmen downed on the Western Front between 1914 and 1918, representing a contribution on the author's part to the 100th anniversary of the Great War. It's speciality focus makes for a truly unique compendium of visceral First World War accounts of the incredible, bloody, aerial battles flown by the RFC, German, American, British and Commonwealth pilots shot down over the Western Front, also including stories of their escapes and lives in PoW camps. Whilst the predominant focus is on the airmen who saw action during the Great War, the author also provides startling tales of female heroism. There is a full chapter dedicated to the life and death of Norfolk heroine, Edith Cavell, a Norwich-born nurse who saved the lives of hundreds of soldiers from both sides during the conflict, and perished in the endeavour. 

Amongst the famous pilots covered are; VCs Billy Bishop and Freddie West; Dice-with-Death Dallas; Mannock – The King of the Fighter Aces and Frank Luke the Balloon Buster. This book contains vivid accounts of some of the most heroic actions in the history of aerial warfare, all taking place within the brutal four year stretch of the Great War.

Vintage Airfix Review:

No review currently available.

Return to Top

 

My War in the Air 1916

By Captain Alan Bott MC

My War in the Air 1916Description:

Originally published under the title An Airman's Outing, this magnificent title chronicles the daily life of the Flying Officer during the Great War. Touchingly dedicated to 'The Fallen of Umpty Squadron R.F.C.', Bott chronicles the lives and losses of his squadron as they carried out their duties over France in 1916. A modest and unflinching account of Great War aviation, Bott neither aggrandises nor dismisses any achievement of his crack squadron. A squadron that suffered so heavily, holding the record for casualties sustained by any flying squadron during three months, from the beginning of the war to the end of 1916 - a testament to the bravery and determination of the men who continued to serve within it.

Tinged by this sadness, My War in the Air 1916 still conveys the aspirations of the British Royal Flying Corps in their early days, and the hope its many flying aces placed in the establishment, as a powerful tool to defend and protect. As W. S. Brancker states inside, 'War has been the making of aviation; let us hope that aviation will be the destruction of war.'

Vintage Airfix Review:

No review currently available.

Return to Top

 

Pioneers of Aerial Combat

By Michael Foley

Pioneers of Aerial CombatDescription:

When the Wright Brothers made their first flight in the early years of the twentieth century it sparked the imagination of those who wanted to fly, both in their country and around the world. In Britain, however, the spark wasn't strong enough to light a fire and it was in other parts of Europe, notably France, where flight began to develop seriously.

Early pioneers of flight faced a high level of danger and many died in pursuit of fulfilling their dream. Although aircraft design had made incredible progress by the time of the outbreak of war, accidents still occurred on a regular basis. For some time, as many pilots died in accidents as they did in combat. 

This publication consolidates a range of stories, insights, and facts that, when combined, offer a vivid impression of events as they unfolded. The chaos stirred up during the First World War and the scramble to develop aircraft in response to the threat to homeland security is eloquently relayed, as are the battles that characterized this conflicted era. The reality of conflict gave aviation engineers and designers the opportunity to test their craft in the harshest of environments, pushing the benchmark ever higher in terms of what could be achieved. Sure to appeal to aviation enthusiasts and historians alike, this work offers the reader a full account of the developmental early days of flight.

Vintage Airfix Review:

No review currently available.

Return to Top

 

Political Wings

By Alun Wyburn-Powell

Political WingsDescription:

This is the first biography of Rt. Hon. William Wedgwood Benn DSO, DFC, first Viscount Stansgate, cabinet minister under MacDonald and Attlee, Air Commodore with active service in both World Wars, defector from the Liberals to Labour over his dispute with Lloyd George, and father of Tony Benn. Benn served in the army and RAF during the First World War (when he took part in the first parachute drop behind enemy lines at night) and in the Second World War he reached the rank of acting Air Commodore). His eldest son Michael, heir to the viscountcy, died on active service with the RAF, leaving his second son Tony to inherit the title and a seat in the House of Lords. 

Before his death, Tony Benn gave extensive interviews for this book. His brother, David has also provided interviews and material, as have other members of the family including Stephen Benn (now the third Viscount Stansgate). Extensive paperwork left by William Wedgwood Benn (now in the Parliamentary Archives) including his diary and unfinished, unpublished autobiography were all utilised in the construction of this biography. Alun Wyburn-Powell has managed to construct a biographical study of real force, weaving together snippets from Benn's own private papers with insights from his family and colleagues in order to create an authentic impression of Benn and the times in which he lived.

Vintage Airfix Review:

No review currently available.

Return to Top

 

Racing Ace

By Dr Julian Lewis

Racing AceDescription:

Samuel 'Kink' Kinkead won two DSCs with the Royal Naval Air Service, two DFC with the fledgling RAF and the DSO in Russia.

A brilliant pilot, post-war he was a long range aviation pioneer and leading racing ace selected for the international Schneider Trophy in Venice in 1927. Tragically he was killed aged just 31 in 1928 attempting to shatter the World Air Speed record. He is honoured by several memorials, at Cranwell, the RAF Club in Piccadilly, at Fawley and a permanent exhibition in the Kinkead Room at Calshot from where he set out on his final flight.

Julian Lewis has pieced together Kink's extraordinary story of achievement during his short but eventful and glamorous life. A fascinating account of flying derring-do in war and peace.

Vintage Airfix Review:

No review currently available.

Return to Top

 

Recollections of the Great War in the Air

By James McConnell

Recollections of the Great War in the AirDescription:

In 1915 James Roger McConnell enlisted as a US volunteer in the French Flying Corps. He was part of a remarkable band of American volunteers which were formed into the famous American 'Lafayette' Escadrille. 'Flying for France' was his personal account of the war in the air as seen through the eyes a front-line pilot of the American Escadrille, which was then based at Verdun. His memoirs produce an amazing insight into the early aerial battles and trace the evolution of aerial warfare as the rickety aircraft of 1915 rapidly evolved into the purpose built fighters of 1917.

Casualties among the American Escadrille were very high and McConnell's own luck finally ran out when he was ambushed by two German fighters and was killed in action in March 1917. His gripping and detailed memoir of the war is his lasting memorial; his honest account of the everyday life of a pilot in the Great War is matched only by 'Sagittarius Rising'. However his dramatic description of the battlefield of Verdun viewed from above is one of the classic descriptions of any wartime memoir and is unmatched by any other Great War writer.

McConnell's memoir is made all the more moving by the fact that the reader is aware that the writer's life will soon be cut tragically short. Essential reading for anyone interested in military history or aviation.

Vintage Airfix Review:

No review currently available.

Return to Top

 

The 'Baby Killers'

By Thomas Fegan

The 'Baby Killers'Description:

Just over a decade after the Wright Brothers' triumph of powered flight, the conduct of war was changed for ever. Until the Kaiser's Zeppelins raided British cities and towns, it had been unthinkable that civilian populations and property hundreds of miles from the battlefield could be at risk from sudden death and destruction.

In the first section of The 'Baby Killers' Thomas Fegan charts the precise chronology of the air raids on Britain in this most thorough and fascinating work. From the start-point of the doom-laden prophecies of HG Wells and others, he describes the development of the German threat and the desperate search for answers to it. He analyses public reaction and assesses the effectiveness of the campaign as it progressed from airships to Gotha heavy bombers and, later, 'Giants'.

The second part of this superbly researched book features a gazetteer to the places bombed. The extent of the list, which includes Edinburgh, Hull and Greater Manchester, will almost certainly surprise most readers. Helpfully there are also comprehensive lists of memorials and relevant museums. The 'Baby Killers' provides a chilling insight into an aspect of The Great War which is all too often overlooked. Yet, at the time, these raids, while modest compared with those of the Second World War Blitz, shook national
morale and instilled great fear and outrage. This is an important and highly readable work.

As featured in the Burton Mail.

Vintage Airfix Review:

No review currently available.

Return to Top

 

Result Pages: [<< Prev]   1  2  3  4  [Next >>]  Displaying 16 to 30 (of 50 Books)
0 items
Articles
Quick Product Search
 
Category:


Use keywords to find the product you are looking for.
Advanced Search
Information

Airfix Vintage Classics

Become a fan of The Official Vintage Airfix Page on Facebook   Follow Vintage Airfix on Twitter